Academic Programs Catalog

General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations


General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations


Costs

Michigan State University reserves the right to make changes to the types, structures, and rates for fees, deposits, tuition, and housing. Every effort will be made to give as much advance notice as possible.


Advanced Payments and Deposits

Application Processing Fee

Domestic Undergraduate and Graduate Applicants $65.00
International Undergraduate and Graduate Applicants $75.00

An application fee, not applicable to any other charge and not refundable, is required of each person applying for admission as an undergraduate, graduate-professional or graduate student. Payment must accompany the application that is submitted to the Office of Admissions. A domestic applicant who is financially unable to submit the application processing fee may request an application fee waiver (international students are not eligible for these waivers and they are rarely granted for graduate school applicants).

Advanced Enrollment Deposit $250.00

All entering undergraduate students are required to pay a $250 Advanced Enrollment Deposit (AED). Payment by the student confirms acceptance of admission, reserves the student a place in both the entering class and a residence hall, and allows the student to register for a required New Student Orientation (NSO) Program which fills on a first-come, first-served basis. An admitted student who is financially unable to submit the AED may request a deferral by contacting the Office of Admissions. If you qualified for an application fee waiver, a portion of your deposit will be deferred automatically. The $250 AED is fully refundable to fall freshman students who cancel their admission prior to May 1. There is no refund for spring or summer semesters, or for transfer students any semester.


Course Fees and Tuition (2022-23)

Students are assessed tuition and fees each semester on the basis of their level, class, residency status, and number of credits carried. Undergraduate students taking 12 – 18 credit hours will be charged a flat tuition rate. Tuition is charged on a per credit hour basis for undergraduate students taking fewer than 12 credit hours. If a student has more than 18 credits, the flat tuition rate plus the regular per credit hour rate for each credit hour over 18 applies. Units are listed below in footnote.

Certain courses may be assessed additional section fees, such as certain kinesiology courses, that are not reflected in the Tuition, Fees, and Student Voted Taxes tables below. Further information regarding additional section fees can be found in the Schedule of Courses in the course description content.

If there is any question of the student's right to an in-state classification, it is the student's responsibility to contact the Office of the Registrar at least one month before enrolling.

As amended by the Board of Trustees in the 2021-22 Budget Guidelines. Amounts subject to change for 2022-23 and future years.

For current tuition rates, visit the Student Accounts Web site at http://www.ctlr.msu.edu/COStudentAccounts/Tuition_Fees_MainMenu_Year.aspx.


Doctoral Students

All doctoral students must register and pay for a minimum of 24 credits of doctoral dissertation research (course number 999).

 


Minimum Registration

All students using university services (faculty consultation included) must be registered each semester. Minimum registration consists of one course, one credit. 


Other Costs


Mandatory, Refundable Fees (per semester) (2022-23)

Student Taxes
Undergraduate Students (ASMSU) $21.00
FM Radio Tax (all degree students) $3.00
Graduate Students (COGS)2 $11.00
Graduate-Professional Medical Students (COGS and COMS)3 $12.50
James Madison College Student Senate Tax $2.00
State News
All students enrolling for 6 credits or more $7.50

1The major specific program fees and International Student Fee are refunded in the same percentage as course fees when withdrawing from the University or dropping from above 4 credits to 4 credits or less.
2 The COGS tax for summer session is $5.00.
3 The COGS and COMS tax for summer session is $6.50.


Mandatory, Non-Refundable Fees (per semester)

Late Enrollment

All Semesters:

Students who initially enroll after the start of classes $100.00

Returned Check Fee Service (Includes rejected electronic checks, i.e. ACH)
These fees are assessed as the result of a check/ACH that fails to clear the customers bank $25.00
Late Payment Charges
Student Receivable or short term loan account payments being made after the due date $25.00
Short term loan payments made after the due date $25.00


Rates for University Housing

The rates listed below are for first-year students for Fall 2022 and Spring 2023 year. In addition, students living in undergraduate housing will be charged a Residence Halls Association tax of $25 per semester.  Students living in Owen Graduate Hall will be assessed a $8 ($2.50 in summer) Owen Graduate Association tax per semester.

Dining Service for 2022-2023 includes expanded serving hours of 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., seven days a week, in at least one location per residential zone (East, South, Brody, North, and River Trail). Choices include cooked-to-order stations, retail coffee shops, grab-n-go options, pizza and subs, as well as new selections reflecting emerging dining trends. Note: All plans include free daily access to a Combo-X-Change meal at any of the Sparty's, and retail dining locations on campus.

    Silver Plan - Anytime access. This is the base plan.
    Gold Plan - Anytime access, four guest meal passes and $150 per semester in Spartan Cash.
    Platinum Plan - Anytime access, eight guest meal passes and $300 per semester in Spartan Cash.

Residence Halls — Room and Board (per semester)1, 2, 3

Double Room (per person)

Silver 

Gold 

Platinum

Room rates

$2,269

$2,269

$2,269

Board rates

$3,226

$3,376

$3,526

Total

$5,495

$5,645

$5,795

*  Designated Single Room (add $1,545 per semester)
    Permanent Single Room (add $895 per semester)

Owen Graduate Hall (per semester)1, 2, 5

Permanent Single Room Only $3,291.00
Designated Single Room Only $3,879.00

1855 Place Single Student Apartments (monthly rates)6

One Bedroom Studio (Per Resident) $1,015
Two Bedroom Standard (Per Resident) $922
Two Bedroom Efficiency (Per Resident) $902
Four Bedroom Townhome (Per Resident) $876
Four Bedroom Flat (Per Resident) $834
Four Bedroom Efficiency (Per Resident) $809

University Apartments,2, 4
1855 Place Family Apartments (monthly rates)

One Bedroom $824
Two Bedroom $953

University Village Apartments (monthly rates)

Four Bedroom (per resident) $755

1   Although these rates are for each semester, the Housing Contract is signed for fall and spring. To determine costs for fall and spring, multiply the rate by two.

2    The Housing Contract details the contract termination procedure. Further appeals shall be subject to judicial review as provided in Student Rights and Responsibilities at Michigan State University.

3    Rates do not include resident student government taxes of $25 per semester for undergraduate students who live in residence halls. 
4    Quoted rates are student rates.
5    Dining plans for Owen Hall residents, however, an on-campus housing contract. Room rates do not include student government taxes of $8 ($2.50 in summer) per semester for students who live in the graduate hall.

For more information on living at MSU visit www.liveon.msu.edu


Miscellaneous Fees and Deposits

Course and Class Fees

Certain courses require course and class fees. The costs must be paid by the participating students in addition to tuition and fees.

Health Insurance Program

International students, and students in the Colleges of Human, Osteopathic, and Veterinary Medicine are required to purchase the Michigan State University health insurance plan unless they are eligible for a waiver and can demonstrate other health insurance coverage. Health insurance coverage is provided from August 16 through August 15. Insurance premiums for student annual coverage are collected in two installments.

Fall 2022 Registration Billing Statement: International Student $1,142
Medical Student $1,142
Spring 2023 Registration Billing Statement: International Student $1,142
Medical Student $1,142

These amounts are included in the Minimum Amount Due on the Registration Bill and must be paid to complete registration. Insurance premiums for coverage of spouse/dependents are to be paid directly to the insurance company.  Medical students and some eligible international students may waive the MSU plan (within certain deadlines) by providing proof of comparable health insurance coverage through another plan. For information on waivers and spouse/dependent coverage, visit www.hr.msu.edu/benefits/students.index.html or contact the MSU Human Resources, 1407 South Harrison, 1-517-353-4434 or e-mail Student Insurance at Human Resources at SolutionsCenter@hr.msu.edu.

2022-2023 Annual Premium Rates Domestic Student International Student
Student $2,284.00 $2,284.00
Student/Spouse $4,567.00 $4,567.00
Student/Spouse, One Child $6,851.00 $6,851.00
Student/Spouse, Two or More Children $9,134.00 $9,134.00
Student, One Child $4,567.00 $4,567.00
Student, Two or More Children $6,581.00 $6,581.00
Note: Premiums are subject to change each fall.

Student Motor Vehicle Registration2, 3

Vehicles, motorcycle, electric mobility devices, and Mopeds operated or parked on MSU property by MSU students must be registered with the MSU Parking Office. Failure to do so may result in parking violations and/or visit www.police.msu.edu  to register your vehicle and to view the Student Parking and Driving Regulations. Refer to the Web site for dates to register vehicles.

2022-2023 STUDENT VEHICLE REGISTRATION FEES

Moped Permit $50.00
Resident Student (by lot location) (Fall, Spring, and Summer)            $133.00-320.00
Graduate Assistant (Semester) $133.00
Commuter Student (Fall, Spring, and Summer) $98.00
University Apartment Residents (Fall, Spring, and Summer) $133.00-214.00

Bicycle Registration

Any bicycle possessed, operated, or left unattended on campus must be registered, parked and locked at a bike rack and in operable condition; otherwise, it may be impounded and fees assessed to retrieve it. MSU, City of Lansing, City of East Lansing, Lansing Township and Meridian Township registrations (permits) are acceptable. Permits must be current, valid and adhered to the bike's stationary frame-post below the seat, facing the handlebars. Failure to properly display and/or affix the permit may result in bicycle impoundment. Visit www.police.msu.edu to register a bike (make, color and serial number must be included). There is no charge for the permit.

Campus Bus Service4

All campus bus service is provided by the Capital Area Transportation Authority (CATA). Service operates 24/7 during fall and spring semesters with buses traveling to all University apartments, residence halls, commuter lots and the main campus. All campus fixed routes (Routes 30-39) are fare-free. A 60-cent fare or bus pass is required when riding any off-campus routes or a campus demand-response service such as Lot Link or Night Owl. Bus passes are available at the MSU ID Office in the International Center and online at cata.org. Paratransit service is a curb-to-curb service designed for persons with disabilities. Free fare cards are available for certified students through MSU's Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities. For more information, email CATA at info@cata.org or call 1-517-394-1000.
 

Spartan Marching Band Fees

Gloves (per pair) $5.00
Locker Rental (required) $10.00
Shoes $43.25
Uniform Cleaning $95.00

Specific charges are listed in the Marching Band Handbook sent to qualifying students. Early arrival housing fees vary depending on student's housing accommodations. See the Marching Band Handbook for more information.

Certified Copy of Diploma $25.00
Duplicate or Replacement Diploma $50.00
Microfilming Fee for Master's Thesis $20.00
Microfilming Fee for Doctoral Dissertation $20.00
Copyright Fee for Master's Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation $75.00
    This optional fee covers the cost of supplying a microfilm copy of the thesis or dissertation
     to the Library of Congress and copyright processing.

Student Activity Admission

Student discounts on tickets at the Wharton Center for Performing Arts:

MSU students are able, WHEN APPLICABLE, to purchase up to two $19.00 Performing Art Series and up to two $29.00 MSU Federal Credit Union Broadway tickets per valid ID.

Athletic Event Admission

Current Michigan State students can purchase exclusive student admission packages for Spartan football, men’s basketball and hockey by visiting MSUSpartans.com/STX or by calling the Spartan Ticket Office at 1-517-355-1610. For the football season, the student package ($185 for 2022) includes entry to all seven home games and the official student section t-shirt. Memberships to the Izzone ($55), the official student section of Spartan men’s basketball, are available which provides you access to purchase individual game tickets for only $10 and the official Izzone tshirt. Season admission to the Munnsters, the official hockey student section, are also for sale, which includes admission to all home games and the official Munnsters jersey. All packages are on sale until capacity is reach or the season begins. Also, Michigan State students receive free admission to all other home Spartan athletic events: women’s basketball, volleyball, men’s and women’s soccer, baseball, softball, field hockey, wrestling, gymnastics, men’s and women’s tennis, men’s and women’s golf, track and field and cross country. For more information regarding MSU student sections, visit MSUSpartans.com/studentsections.


1    For additional information refer to Student Health Service at Olin Health Center in this section and in the Other Departments and Offices for Research and Services section of this catalog.
2    Permits purchased subsequent to fall semester are reduced in price proportionately.
3    First-year students residing in Residence Halls are not eligible to operate a motor vehicle on campus.
4    For additional information refer to the Transportation Services on Campus section of this catalog.


Refund Policy


Refund of Course Fees and Tuition

If a student withdraws from the university or drops a course, the refund policy will be:

  1. For changes made through the first ¼ of the term of instruction (measured in weekdays, not class days), 100 percent of the semester course fees and tuition for the net credits dropped will be refunded, if applicable.
  2. For changes made after the first ¼ of the term of instruction and through the end of the session, no refund will be made for any credits dropped.  Any courses approved for late add will be billed in the next monthly bill.

When dropping a course, the date the notification from the department is received in the Office of the Registrar will determine the amount of refund applicable.

Appeals concerning the refund policy should be referred to the Office of the Registrar.

Medical Withdrawal Policy for Class Tuition and Fees Refund

If a medical withdrawal is approved with a committee-required last date of attendance starting with the first day of semester through the last day of the end of the semester refund period, students receive “no record class drops and 100% tuition and fees refund.  If a medical withdrawal is approved with a committee-required last date of attendance starting with the first day of no tuition refund through the last day of the semester, students receive W grades and a lump-sum tuition refund of $500 which is the approximate cost of 1 tuition credit hour for an in-state Freshman. 

Students are responsible for any tuition and fee charges not covered by the lump-sum tuition refund.  If the lump-sum tuition refund creates a tuition and fees credit on the students’ account, the refund will be applied to the students’ accounts.

This policy is non-appealable.

Net refunds due to a drop of credits or withdrawal from the university are processed daily and posted to students' accounts. Amounts due students will be applied against outstanding balances owed the University or returned to students. Questions regarding account balances should be referred to the Student Accounts Office, Hannah Administration Building, 426 Auditorium Road, Room 140.


Financial Aid Refund Policy

Dropping Credits

  1. Students may be billed for a portion or all of their financial aid awards if they drop credits or do not carry the minimum number of credits required for aid eligibility.
  2. View the enrollment chart at www.finaid.msu.edu/enrlchrt.asp to determine if particular grants or scholarships will be reduced when dropping credits. Students will be billed for aid adjustments caused by changes in enrollment status.

Withdrawal from the University

  1. In addition to billing for the dropping of credits associated with withdrawal, there may be additional billing, particularly if a student has received federal financial aid funds (including Federal Direct Student Loans), which were to have covered the entire semester educational costs. Refer to the next section for more detailed information on the return of aid rules for federal financial aid.

    Withdrawal up until the end of the first quarter of the term of instruction will result in 100 percent billing of federal grant aid (Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Pell Grant) and Michigan Competitive Scholarship and may also result in a partial or complete billing of loan aid (Federal Stafford Loan, and other financial aid).
  2. The bill calculated as a result of withdrawal will depend on the official date of withdrawal and/or the last date of attendance and the percentage and amount of institutional refund to be received.

Return of Funds Policy for Federal Financial  Aid Recipients Who Withdraw

When a student who received federal financial aid, referred to as Title IV aid, withdraws from a term, the Office of Financial Aid is required to perform a calculation to see what portion of the disbursed aid must be returned by the school and/or the student, and to determine if any undisbursed aid can still be released.

There are three types of withdrawals that fall under the return to Title IV (R2T4) regulations:

  1. Official Withdrawals – student contacts the Registrar’s Office or their advisor to initiate an official withdrawal for a semester, or the student drops all of their courses using the online enrollment system.
  2. Unofficial Withdrawals -  student begins to attend class, but stops attending prior to the end of the term without providing official notification to the University is . For Title IV purposes, the withdrawal date for students who unofficially withdraw is the midpoint of the semester unless a documented last date of attendance can be determined. If the University determines that a student did not provide official notice of the intent to withdraw due to illness, accident, grievous personal loss or other circumstances beyond the student’s control, the University may use a date that is related to that circumstance Requests for retroactive withdrawals after the term is over will not supersede the determination of an unofficial withdrawal for aid purposes.
  3. Modular withdrawals – If a student is enrolled in a course that does not run the full length of a term they are considered to be enrolled in a module and may be subject to the modular withdrawal rules. If they cease attendance at any point prior to completing the period of enrollment they may be considered a withdrawal unless they have met one of three exceptions, or unless the school obtains written confirmation from the student at the time of the withdrawal that he or she will attend a module that begins later in the same period of enrollment.  The exceptions are 1) if the student has met degree requirements to graduate, 2) the student has already passed a half-time credit load for their program in the term or 3) the student has passed a class or classes that are at least 49% of the length of the period of enrollment. If written confirmation of future attendance is received from the student but the student does not return as scheduled, the student is considered to have withdrawn and the students withdrawal date. will be the date that would have been used had the student not provided notification.

When a student is considered to have withdrawn, as described above, during an enrollment period in which they have begun attendance and received federal Title IV financial aid, Michigan State University is required to determine the amount of earned and unearned Title IV aid. A student is only eligible to retain the percentage of Title IV aid disbursed that is equal to the percentage of the enrollment period that was completed by the student (calculated daily). The unearned Title IV aid must then be returned to the appropriate federal aid programs. If more than 60% of the enrollment period has been completed by the student, no Title IV aid needs to be returned.

According to university policy, when a student withdraws prior to the quarter of the semester and/or receives a 100% tuition refund from the university, all of that semesters federal Title IV grant aid (FSEOG, Pell Grant, TEACH Grant, Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant) will be billed back to the students account. Most non-federal aid will also be billed back to the student’s account. All Title IV aid will be included in the calculations outlined below. Depending on the results of the calculations, some or all of the federal grant aid may be re-disbursed to the student account.

The following steps will be followed when determining the amount of Title IV aid to be returned upon withdrawal:

  1. Determine percentage of enrollment period completed by student. Divide the number of days attended by the number of days in the enrollment period. If the calculated percentage exceeds 60%, or meets other exemptions as described above, then the student has earned all Title IV aid for the enrollment period.
  2. Calculate the amount of earned Title IV aid. Multiply the percentage of the enrollment period completed by the total Title IV aid disbursed (or could have been disbursed as defined by late disbursement rules).
  3. Determine amount of unearned aid to be returned to Title IV aid program accounts. Subtract the amount of earned federal aid from the total amount of federal aid disbursed. The difference must be returned to the appropriate Title IV aid program(s).
  4. Return of Title IV funds by institution and student:
    1. MSU will return unearned Title IV aid up to an amount that is equal to the total institutional charges for the payment period multiplied by the percentage of the Title IV aid that was unearned. Generally, a student’s tuition and fee refund and/or University Housing refund will satisfy this liability. On occasion, however, particularly when the student remains in University Housing beyond the withdrawal date, a bill will result.
    2. The student will be responsible for the balance of unearned Title IV aid. In most cases, this will be the amount of federal aid funds a student received in the form of a refund for non-institutional expenses multiplied by the percentage of Title IV aid that was unearned.
      1. If the student’s portion of aid to be returned is a loan, then the student is not immediately required to repay the loan. The terms of the original loan repayment agreement will apply.
      2. If the student’s portion of aid to be returned is an overpayment of a grant, the student is required to only repay the amount exceeding 50% of the total grants. MSU will restore the grant funds to the appropriate federal account, with a resulting charge to the student’s account. The student will be responsible for repaying MSU for the grant overpayment.
  5. Unearned Title IV Funds will be returned to federal programs in the following order:
    1. Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
    2. Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans
    3. Federal Direct Grad Plus
    4. Federal Direct Parent Loan (PLUS)
    5. Federal Pell Grants
    6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity (FSEOG)
    7. TEACH Grants
    8. Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant
    9. Other Grants

A student may be eligible for a post-withdrawal disbursement if, prior to withdrawing, the student earned more federal financial aid than was disbursed. If a student is eligible for a post-withdrawal disbursement of federal grants, it will be processed for the student and a refund will be issued within 14 days of the credit balance.

If the post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, Michigan State University must get the student’s permission before it can disburse the loan. Students may choose to decline some or all of the loan funds so that s/he does not incur additional debt. A notice will be sent out to the student, and the signed, original document must be returned to the Office of Financial Aid within 14 days. Michigan State University may automatically use all or a portion of the post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds for tuition and fees. However, the school needs the student’s permission to use the post-withdrawal grant disbursement for all other school charges. If the student does not give his/her permission, the student will be offered the funds. However, it may be in the student’s best interest to allow the school to keep the funds to reduce the student’s debt at the school.

It is also important to understand that accepting a post-withdrawal disbursement of student loan funds will increase a student’s overall student loan debt that must be repaid under the terms of the Master Promissory Note. Additionally, accepting the disbursement of grant funds will reduce the remaining amount of grant funds available to the student should the student continue his/her education at a later time.

Example of a Title IV return of funds calculation:
Institutional Charges       $5,000
Title IV Loans                  $2,000
Title IV Grants                 $1,000
Total Title IV Aid              $3,000

Student withdrew on 35th day of a 110-day enrollment period.
Percent Earned   35/110 = 32%
Percent Unearned   100% - 32% = 68%
Amount of Title IV aid unearned $3,000 x 68% = $2,040

MSU is responsible for returning the lesser of unearned Title IV aid ($2,040 from above) or unearned institutional charges ($5,000 x 68% = $3,400). MSU will return aid as follows:

Title IV Loans $2,000 (students remaining loan debt = 0)
Title IV Grants $40

The student’s responsibility is amount of aid unearned ($2,040) less school responsibility ($2,040), which is zero.

The example shown above does not reflect every student refund situation that may exist. Questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Office of Financial Aid.

The University reserves the right to amend this policy at any time in order to comply with Federal regulations.

Refund Rules for Other Fees, Taxes, Assessments

The Engineering Program Fee, Science and Technology Fee, Health Science Program Fee, Broad College of Business Program Fee, and the Computational Mathematics Science and Engineering Fee or the differential is refunded in the same percentage as course fees when withdrawing from the University or dropping from above 4 credits to 4 credits or less.

Student government taxes, FM Radio tax, and The State News assessments are refundable upon presentation of the appropriate receipt at the respective organization's office.

Late registration fees will not be refunded.

Residence Hall housing fees are refunded on a pro-rata basis, based on certain variables. In some instances, the cost of room and board may be prorated as of the day following departure, if proper check-out procedures have been followed. Details and procedures are found in the On-Campus Housing Handbook: Terms and Conditions.

University Apartment rent refunds - Tenants will be held to their lease end date, so no proration will occur if they move out early. Refunds for tenants who have been officially released from their lease will be prorated as of the day following the official check out time.

In general, all fees collected by Michigan State University and their respective refund policies shall be subject to judicial review as provided in Student Rights and Responsibilities at Michigan State University.

Military Tuition Assistance (TA) is awarded to a student under the assumption that the student will attend school for the entire period for which the assistance is awarded. When a student withdraws, the student may no longer be eligible for the full amount of TA funds originally awarded.


Military Tuition Assistance (TA) Funds Return Policy

Military Tuition Assistance (TA) is awarded to a student under the assumption that the student will attend school for the entire period for which the assistance is awarded. When a student withdraws, the student may no longer be eligible for the full amount of TA funds originally awarded.

To comply with the new Department of Defense policy, Michigan State University will return any unearned TA funds on a prorated basis through at least the 60% portion of the period for which the funds were provided. TA funds are earned proportionally during an enrollment period, with unearned funds returned based upon when a student stops attending. These funds are returned to the military Service branch.

Instances when a Service member stops attending due to a military service obligation, Michigan State University will work with the affected Service member to identify solutions that will not result in student debt for the returned portion.

Calculation

When a student “officially” withdraws from a course, the date of withdrawal will be used as the last date of attendance. If a student receives a zero grade for a course, that is considered an “unofficial” withdrawal.

For unofficial withdrawals, Michigan State University (MSU) will determine the last date of attendance (LDA) by reviewing the last date of activity within a course. For online courses, MSU will determine LDA based on the last date a student made a contribution to the class or submitted an assignment. For face to face courses, the LDA is reported by the instructor on the grade report.

Once the LDA has been determined, MSU will recalculate the TA eligibility based on the following formula:

For 16-week Course Withdraw, if submitted:
Before or during weeks 1 – 4 = 100% return
During weeks 5-8 = 10% return
During week 9 = 10% return (60% of course is completed)
During weeks 10-16 = 0% return

For courses that have durations differing from the 16-week calculation above, if submitted:
Before classes begin through the quarter of the course = 100% return
From quarter of the course through 60% completion = 10% return
After 60% completion = 0% return
 


Other Information


Fee Payment

All fees, tuition, and housing charges noted above except those in the sections labeled Advanced Payments and Deposits and Miscellaneous Fees and Deposits are due and payable upon issuance of a Billing Statement for the semester. The bill is only available online in .the student portal. Paper bills are not mailed. Students will be notified by e-mail when the Registration Billing Statement is available in the student portal. Please refer to the Student Accounts Web site at: ctlr.msu.edu/costudentaccounts for more detailed information. Payment may be made by check or money order payable to Michigan State University or by electronic check/ACH or credit card through STUINFO. Payments made with Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express credit cards are only accepted via the web and carry a convenience fee. Checks are accepted subject to collection. Wire payments are facilitated through our partnership with Flywire. More information can be found in the payment portal for Flywire payments. Most 529 payments can be made electronically in the payment portal.


Payment Plan

Students may choose to enroll in a payment plan to assist with making their payments. A $40 nonrefundable enrollment fee is required with the first payment. For fall and spring semesters, a 25% down payment is required at the time of enrollment, plus the $40 payment plan enrollment fee. The remaining balance will be paid in three equal amounts over the course of the semester (if enrolled by a certain date). For summer semester, a 33% down payment is required at the time of enrollment, plus the $40 payment plan fee. The remaining balance will be paid in two equal amounts. (if enrolled by certain date). 

Fall Semester

Initial Payment due date August 29
2nd installment due date October 1
3rd installment due date November 1
4th installment due date December 1

Spring Semester

Initial Payment due date January 4
2nd installment due date February 1
3rd installment due date March 1
4th installment due date April 1

Summer Semester

Initial Payment due date May 10
2nd installment due date June 6
3rd installment due date July 5

A $30 late payment charge will be made whenever any payment is made after the due date. Students will be held from enrolling for future semesters whenever current semester payment plan payments are past due. Failure to make deferred payments on a timely basis may also result in the loss of the opportunity to defer payments.

Students receiving  VA chapter 31 or 33 funding will not be subject to certain penalties, including the assessment of late fees, the denial of access to classes, libraries, or other institutional facilities, or the requirement that a covered individual borrow additional funds, due to the individual’s inability to meet his or her financial obligations to the institution due to the delayed disbursement funding from the VA under chapter 31 or 33.


Financial Aid

All financial aid (except College Work Study) which has been authorized at the time the MSU Billing Statement is produced will appear on the bill as Anticipated Aid. 
Actual financial aid payments are not made until ten days before the first class day of the semester.  Until that time, aid which students are eligible to receive will be listed on the bill and will reduce the amount owed.

Aid that does not appear as Anticipated on the account may require additional actions in the Student Financial Planning (SFP) financial aid system. Students or authorized guests may visit the portal at https://student.msu.edu/splash.html to view requested documents or actions.

Eligibility for each award is monitored during the semester and may change due to changes in enrollment as of the time it is credited to the account through the end of the semester.  Refer to the Office of Financial Aid web page at https://finaid.msu.edu/ for further information on types of aid and the requirements for each.

If the total financial aid credited to the account exceeds the amount owed, the student may be entitled to a refund.  Refunds are sent via Direct Deposit by the Student Accounts Office according to their calendar and students can contact that office for more information.

NOTE: Financial Aid for the current academic year may be used to pay past due debts on the account up to a maximum of $200.  The student must contact the Student Accounts Office to request this service.  Some exceptions may be made for non-federal funds.  Students should review their financial aid resources to determine that they have excess funds before contacting Student Accounts.

Additional aid that is awarded after a semester's bill has been produced is automatically applied to the account and will pay on that semester's costs.  A prior debt of up to $200 will automatically be paid with financial aid unless the student informs the Student Accounts Office to the contrary in writing 10 days before the start of the semester.
 


Books

Costs for books vary widely for various academic programs.  The average costs for undergraduates is estimated to be $627 per semester.  For graduates, the cost estimate is $881 per semester.  Graduate/professional costs vary from law ($1536 per semester) to $964 per term for first year medical and veterinary students.

Financial Aid and Repeats
Federal financial aid regulations limit the number of times a student may repeat a course and receive financial aid for that course.  The following guidelines apply to students eligible for federal aid.

  1. A student may receive aid when repeating a course that was previously failed (received a 0.0 or No Pass) multiple times.
  2. Once a student passes a class, they can only receive aid for retaking that course one additional time, regardless of the grade earned for that additional attempt. Any subsequent attempts will not be eligible for aid.
  3. If a student retakes a course that is not aid eligible, a recalculation of aid is done to exclude the credits for the repeated course.  Students are notified by the Office of Financial Aid if their aid needs to be reduced.
  4. A course that is dropped is not considered an attempt for purposes of this policy.

Returned Items

[Includes rejected electronic check/Automated Clearing House (ACH) payments]

A $25.00 returned item service fee will be assessed to a student whose ACH/Check payment is returned from their financial institution to MSU unpaid.
In addition to the returned item service charge, the university reserves the right to take one or more of the following actions:

  1. Place an immediate enrollment and financial hold.
  2. Place the individual on the University Bad Check/ACH List which precludes the individual from presenting checks to the University for any reason and may be a cause for denying future short term loans.
  3. Block the student and other authorized guest users from making ACH tuition payments.
  4. Transfer the debt to a collection agency.
  5. File a complaint with the police for possible prosecution.
  6. Refer the student to the Judicial Affairs Office for disciplinary action.
  7. Bring civil action against the individual for the amount of a returned check/ACH not redeemed within 30 days of the date of the notification letter and $250 in costs. In addition, the court could rule that you must also pay the greater of $100 or two times the amount of the returned check/ACH. If you pay the total amount due within 30 days, no civil action will be taken against you.


Principles and Instructions Governing MSU Student Identification


Principles

  1. Each student of Michigan State University is issued an identification (ID) card following initial enrollment.
  2. The ID card is the property of Michigan State University.
  3. Library privileges, access to university buildings, facilities and classrooms, and purchase of tickets and entry into athletic and entertainment events may require the possession and presentation of the ID card upon request.
  4. Alteration, falsification, or misuse of the ID card is a violation of General Student Regulation 5.00 and other regulations as applicable.

 


Instructions

  1. Each student is responsible for all use of the ID card whether authorized or unauthorized. The ID card should not be loaned, or left where it might be used by an unauthorized person.
  2. In case the ID card is lost, go online at www.spartancash.com  to deactivate meals and Spartan Cash and call the main Library 1-517-355-2333 immediately. Each student is responsible for all materials checked out of the libraries with the ID card.
  3. Replacement Costs -   $20.00

Replacement ID cards are made in the MSU ID office, 170 International Center. Pictured ID is required. The charge will be applied to a student receivables account.

 


Student Spouses

Spouses of registered students may obtain IDs entitling them to certain privileges. The student and spouse must appear in person in  170 International Center and present the student’s Michigan State University ID and proof of marriage. There is no charge for the initial spouse card.

 


Administrative Ruling on Holds on Enrollment, Registration, Readmission, and University Services

A.    AUTHORITY FOR HOLD USE

  1. Financial Holds
    The Vice President for Finance and Treasurer is responsible for the collection, custody, and accounting for all monies due the University. Holds may be employed to collect any financial obligations due to the University's operating funds or to student loan funds.
  2. Conduct Holds
    The procedures for student discipline are specified in Michigan State University Student Rights and Responsibilities (SRR), Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities (GSRR), Law Student Rights and Responsibilities (LSRR), and Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities (MSRR). Administrators and hearing bodies are specifically authorized under this administrative ruling to request of the Office of the Provost or the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services the use of the conduct hold related to a specific aspect of the student conduct process (outlined in “Criteria for Hold Use”).
  3. Academic Holds
    Academic holds are used to assure that students abide by reasonable rules and regulations as a condition of admission to and retention in the University. Agencies of the University and academic administrators are authorized under this administrative ruling to initiate use of the academic hold for this purpose.
  4. Administrative Holds
    Administrative holds are also used to assure that students abide by reasonable rules and regulations as a condition of admission to and retention in the University. Agencies of the University and academic administrators are authorized under this administrative ruling to initiate use of the administrative hold for this purpose.

B.    CRITERIA FOR HOLD USE

  1. Financial Holds
    Criteria for use of the financial hold shall be as follows:
    1. Holds may be employed to collect any financial obligations due to the University's operating funds or to student loan funds.
      Examples of these obligations are: student tuition, residence hall room and board, deferred payments, traffic violations, charges for damages to University property, University housing apartment rent, past due loans (including ASMSU Student Loan Fund), library fines, bad checks cashed by students or presented in payment of student indebtedness, charges originating in various operating units (such as the Health Center, MSU Union, Veterinary Clinic, etc.), overdrafts in student organizations accounts, etc.
    2. Holds may not be used for collection of debts owed to any non-University agency. For purposes of this administrative ruling, registered student organizations, and student media groups (newspapers and radio) are defined as non-University agencies.
    3. Except in the case of bad checks or debts turned over to Delinquent Receivables within the Controller’s Office, holds may be used only in those cases in which the student has been given or sent adequate notice of his or her indebtedness and warning of hold use prior to issuance of the hold.
    4. A current list of all University agencies authorized by the Vice President for Finance and Treasurer to issue financial holds shall be maintained by the Student Receivables Division, Controller's Office.
    5. Students are entitled to appeal the legitimacy of charges placed against them through established due process procedures. Students are expected to exercise these rights at the time of original notification of indebtedness.
    6. A student will not be permitted to enroll for courses, be readmitted to the University, have an application for admission to a new program of study processed, or receive services such as transcripts and diplomas, if a financial hold has been placed on the student. Additionally, in some circumstances, financial aid processing may be withheld if a financial hold has been placed.
    7. If a student has enrolled for courses and has not paid the financial obligation which created the financial hold by a specified due date, the student will be dropped from the courses in which he/she is enrolled. 
  2. Conduct Holds
    The following three types of conduct holds are available to administrators and hearing bodies pursuant to this document:
    1.  Suspension/Dismissal Hold: A suspension/dismissal hold may be imposed for a student who has been suspended or dismissed under the procedures outlined in the SRR, GSRR, LSRR, or MSRR to prevent the student’s reenrollment and/or registration.
    2. SCCR Hold: A Student Conflict and Conflict Resolution (SCCR) hold may be imposed in order to (1) require a student to respond to an allegation that the student violated University regulations, in accordance with the due process guidelines outlined in the SRR, GSRR, LSRR, or MSRR or (2) ensure that a student complies with all sanctions imposed per the procedures outlined in the SRR, GSRR, LSRR, or MSRR.
    3. Investigation Hold: An investigation hold may be imposed until the conclusion of the investigation and appeal process involving an alleged violation of the University’s Anti-Discrimination Policy (ADP) or Relationship Violence and Sexual Misconduct Policy (RVSMP).
    4. For all conduct holds except the Investigation Hold, a student will not be permitted to enroll for courses, be registered, be readmitted to the University, have an application for admission to a new program of study processed, or receive an official transcript, or receive a diploma if a conduct hold has been imposed.  For the Investigation Hold, the student will not be permitted to receive an official transcript or receive a diploma until the hold is lifted.
    5. The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services or the Office of the Provost shall authorize the issuance of holds under the terms of the criteria in the above sections.
  3. Academic Holds
    1. The Provost and College deans and their designees are authorized to issue an academic hold which prevents a student from enrolling in courses and registering (paying of fees) because the student (1) has not met or needs to complete an academic requirement, e.g., has not declared a major, has failed to meet conditions of reinstatement or readmission, has failed to take the international student English proficiency test, has failed to supply required transcripts; (2) has been recessed or dismissed; (3) needs to see an academic advisor due to academic-related issues; or (4) has not met or needs to complete a recognized obligation incurred in the regular course of an academic program or in using an academic service.
    2. The student shall have had reasonable opportunity to be informed of and to comply with the academic requirement and shall have been given or sent warning prior to issuance of a hold.
    3. To ensure that the above conditions and criteria are being met, the persons and agencies authorized to issue academic holds shall provide a copy of their hold use procedures to the Office of the Provost for review and approval.
  4. Administrative Holds
    1. The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services will authorize agencies that may place an administrative hold which prevents students from enrolling in courses and registering (payment of fees) and/or financial aid processing. Administrative holds are placed on students who have failed to meet a requirement which has been established by University policy or regulation such as, but not limited to, financial aid requirements, student housing policy, and international student health insurance. Within this category are those regulations with which a student must comply prior to enrollment. A current list of all University agencies authorized by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services to issue administrative holds shall be maintained by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services.
    2. The student shall have been given reasonable opportunity to be informed of and to comply with the administrative requirement and shall have been given or sent notice prior to issuance of a hold.
    3. To ensure the above conditions and criteria are being met, the persons and agencies authorized to issue administrative holds shall provide a copy of their hold use procedures for review and approval to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services.

C.    FURTHER GENERAL STIPULATIONS

  1. Agencies and authorized personnel of the University shall make every effort to minimize the use of holds and shall employ alternative methods to accomplish their purposes whenever feasible.
  2. Procedures for financial hold use shall be developed by the Office of the Vice President for Finance and Treasurer. Procedures for judicial hold use shall be developed by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services and the Office of the Provost. Procedures for academic hold use shall be developed by the Office of the Provost. Procedures for administrative hold use shall be developed by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services. All procedures shall include provision for the following:
    1. Adequate prior notice to the student (including all pertinent details) of pending placement of a hold, prior to issuance except in the case of bad checks.
    2. Procedures for the student to challenge the placement of a hold, prior to the issuance of a hold.
    3. While a student is in the process of appealing the case in question, the hold will not be issued.
    4. Review by the offices responsible for developing hold use procedures to ensure that the administrative ruling on holds is being accurately and consistently followed.
  3. When a student has satisfied the conditions which precipitated a hold, the responsible agency or administrator placing the hold will ensure that the hold is removed.

D.    JUDICIAL REVIEW
        This administrative ruling and all procedures and administrative decisions stemming therefrom shall be subject to judicial review as provided in
        Student Rights and Responsibilities at Michigan State University.


Regulations for Qualifying for In-State Tuition

Michigan State University (MSU) has autonomous, constitutional authority from the State of Michigan to establish the University’s “Regulations for Qualifying for In-State Tuition” and the definition of student residency status as it related to in-state fee status. In other words, Michigan State University’s residency guidelines are independent of other State of Michigan rules or regulations governing residency for other purposes (such as income and property tax liability or eligibility to vote or drive).

Michigan State University is supported by legislative funds derived from State of Michigan tax revenue. As a state tax-supported institution, the University gives preference in admission and tuition to long-term residents of the State of Michigan—that is, to students whose circumstances meet the University’s definition of “domicile.”

Michigan State University will review the application of students who believe they should be classified as in-state under the Regulations. If a student is seeking in-state tuition based on Michigan domicile, but the student’s presence in the state is based on activities or circumstances that are determined to be temporary or indeterminate, the student will be classified as out-of-state.

These regulations establish the criteria for eligibility to receive in-state tuition rates at Michigan State University. Based on information supplied in the application for admission, a student will be classified as an in-state or out-of-state student. Any student who believes they have been incorrectly classified may complete an Application for Classification to In-State Fee Status (see Section VII., below). The application and documentation described in Section VII should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar, Hannah Administration Building, 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150, East Lansing, MI 48824-2603 or emailed to feeclass@msu.edu in .pdf format at least thirty (30) days before the start of the semester for which reclassification is sought.

Frequently Asked Questions
Answers to frequently asked questions about the fee classification process are available in the In-State Tuition Status section of the Office of the Registrar FAQ page. For questions or assistance with the application, please contact the Office of the Registrar at 1-517-432-3488 or feeclass@msu.edu.

STUDENTS MAY QUALIFY FOR IN-STATE TUITION STATUS IN THE FOLLOWING WAYS:

  1. Establishing eligibility through Michigan domicile for U.S. citizens.
  2. Establishing eligibility through Michigan domicile for legal permanent resident aliens and immigrants.
  3. Establishing eligibility through Michigan high school attendance and graduation (must meet all three (3) of the following requirements: (a) attended an accredited Michigan high school for at least three (3) years; (b) graduated from an accredited Michigan high school or obtained a Michigan General Educational Development High School Equivalency Certificate (GED); and (c) will start their education at Michigan State University within forty (40) months of high school graduation or receipt of a GED.
  4. Establishing they meet the criteria outlined in Absences from Michigan in Section IV; or
  5. Establishing they meet one of the criteria listed in Section V.
ON THEIR OWN, THE FOLLOWING CIRCUMSTANCES DO NOT NECESSARILY LEND SUPPORT TO A CLAIM OF MICHIGAN DOMICILE:
  • Enrollment in a Michigan high school, community college, or university
  • Employment in Michigan that is temporary or short-term
  • Employment in Michigan in a position that is normally held by a student
  • Ownership of land, vacation, second home, or investment property in Michigan
  • Presence of relatives, other than the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s) who live in Michigan
  • Possession of a Michigan driver's license, Michigan identification card, or voter's registration
  • Payment of Michigan income or property taxes
  • A statement of intent to be domiciled in Michigan
  • The payment of university fees on behalf of a student
For the purpose of these Regulations:

Dependent Student
A student is presumed to be a dependent student if:
  • They are 24 years of age or younger; unmarried.
  • Are primarily involved in educational pursuits or have not been entirely financially self-supporting through employment.
Non-Dependent Student
A student is presumed to be a non-dependent if:
  • They are 25 years of age or older.
  • Student is married.
DEFINITIONS

Domicile

“Domicile” is defined as the place where an individual intends their true, fixed, primary permanent residence and long-term home to be, and to which the individual intends to return whenever they are absent from the University. In other words, an applicant must document that the state of Michigan is their primary permanent home and they intend to remain in Michigan long-term.

The domicile of a dependent student will be presumed to have the same effect as that of a dependent student's parent(s), stepparent(s), or legal guardian(s). Generally, an individual whose activities and circumstances, as documented to Michigan State University, demonstrate they are domiciled in Michigan will be eligible for in-state tuition status. An individual whose presence in the state is based on activities or circumstances that are indeterminate or temporary will not be eligible for in-state tuition status.

A student or parent(s), or legal guardian(s) of a dependent student cannot be domiciled or maintain a primary permanent residence in more than one state at a time. Establishing Michigan domicile will depend on, among other things, where a student lives/has lived, works/has worked, and attends/has attended school; where the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s) live/have lived, and other clear and convincing evidence that demonstrates Michigan is the student’s primary permanent long-term home.

“Michigan Domicile” - Parent(s), legal guardian(s) or non-dependent student have established a primary permanent residence and household in the state of Michigan for a period of at least twelve (12) consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes of the semester for which they are seeking in-state tuition status (please see 1.A. and 1.B. below).

Residing in Michigan solely for educational reasons does not qualify as being “domiciled” in Michigan. The reason for moving to Michigan must be for other than educational purposes. The student, their parent(s), guardian(s), or spouse must have moved to Michigan for a reason other than qualifying for in-state tuition and intend to make Michigan their primary permanent long-term home.

Legal Guardianship

References to parents shall include legal guardians when (a) the student is the dependent of the legal guardian(s), and (b) such legal guardianship has been established due to the complete incapacity or death of the student's parent(s). A parent's inability to provide funds necessary to support a college education does not constitute complete incapacity.

A temporary care agreement executed by a dependent student’s parent(s) or guardian(s) to other individual(s) who may live in the state of Michigan does not represent full legal guardianship.

Severance of Out-of-State Ties

Severance of out-of-state ties referred to in Section I.A. below means the student, their parent(s), guardian(s), or spouse have severed out-of-state ties by:
  1. The final sale of any primary principal residence located outside the State of Michigan; and/or
  2. Relinquishment or dissolution of ownership or interest in a business, corporation, partnership, and the like, located outside the state of Michigan, if applicable.
I.  ESTABLISHING ELIGIBILITY THROUGH MICHIGAN DOMICILE FOR U.S CITIZENS
A. Dependent Student
The domicile of a dependent student is presumed to be the same as that of the student's parent(s) or legal guardian(s). The following requirements demonstrate, in general terms, that Michigan is the domicile of the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian(s).

Both parents or legal guardians (if married) or one parent (in the case of being single, widowed, legally separated, or divorced) must meet all three (3) of the following requirements to qualify for in-state fee status.
  1. Michigan Domicile. Parent(s) or legal guardian(s) have established a primary permanent residence and household in the state of Michigan for a period of at least twelve (12) consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes of the semester for which they are seeking in-state tuition status.
  2. Michigan Employment. Are employed in the state of Michigan on a permanent basis.
  3. Severance of Out-of-State Ties. Have severed out-of-state ties related to 1) any primary principal residence located outside the state of Michigan; and/or 2) have relinquished or dissolved ownership or interest in a business, corporation, partnership, and the like, located outside the state of Michigan, if applicable.
If parents are legally separated/divorced, please provide documentation. If parents have remarried, additional documentation may be required.

If a dependent student’s parent(s) or legal guardian(s) both reside outside the state of Michigan, the student will be classified as out-of-state.
B. Non-Dependent Student
A non-dependent student will be considered domiciled in Michigan if they have established a primary permanent residence and household in the state of Michigan for a period of at least twelve (12) consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes of the semester for which they are seeking in-state tuition status and also meets either of the following criteria:
  1. The student, or the student’s spouse, is employed in Michigan in a permanent job, and the employment is the primary purpose for the student's presence in Michigan; or
  2. The student has not enrolled in any academic courses at any two-year or four-year degree granting institution during this twelve-month period.
Note that failure to have continuously resided in Michigan for at least the twelve (12) month period will not automatically prevent a student from obtaining in-state tuition status. An exception may be made if the student presents clear and convincing evidence that demonstrates the establishment of a Michigan domicile and circumstances, as determined by the Office of the Registrar Internal Review Committee, that warrant the justification of why the student should be eligible for in-state tuition status even if the student has not resided in Michigan continuously for twelve (12) months prior to the first day of classes in the applicable semester.

II. ESTABLISHING ELIGIBILITY THROUGH MICHIGAN DOMICILE FOR LEGAL PERMANENT RESIDENT ALIENS AND IMMIGRANTS.
Non-U.S. citizens who are entitled to reside permanently in the United States are eligible for in-state tuition by showing they have established a Michigan domicile as defined in Section 1.A. or 1.B. above of these Regulations. Non-U.S. citizens who are considered to have established permanent domicile in the United States include permanent resident aliens, asylees or refugees, or A, E (primary), G, or I nonimmigrant visa holders.

Non-U.S. citizens must provide official documentation establishing their valid immigration status. Non-U.S. citizens must also maintain their immigration status for the duration of their enrollment in order to remain eligible for paying in-state tuition.

III. ESTABLISHING ELIGIBILITY THROUGH MICHIGAN HIGH SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AND GRADUATION
Students must meet all three (3) of the following requirements to be eligible for in-state tuition status:
  1.  Attended an accredited Michigan high school for three (3) years.
  2. Graduated from an accredited Michigan high school or obtain a Michigan General Educational Development High School Equivalency Certificate (GED); and
  3. Start their education at the Michigan State University within forty (40) months of high school graduation or receipt of a GED.
Students are eligible to receive in-state tuition under this section regardless of whether they are domiciled in Michigan, residents of Michigan, or citizens of the United States.

IV. ABSENCES FROM MICHIGAN
Moved for a Job, but Domiciled in Michigan
If a student, or the parent(s) or guardian(s) of a dependent student is domiciled in Michigan but has been temporarily transferred outside Michigan by their employer (but has not become domiciled outside Michigan), the student will receive in-state tuition.

Moved Out of Michigan after Completion of Student’s Sophomore Year
If the student, or the parent(s) or guardian(s) of a dependent student moves out of Michigan after the completion of the student’s sophomore year in an accredited Michigan high school, the student will receive in-state tuition if:
  1. The dependent student's parent(s) or guardian(s) moved out of Michigan after the student completes their sophomore year in a Michigan high school; and
  2. The dependent student and their parent(s) or legal guardian(s) resided in Michigan for a minimum of ten (10) years prior to their departure
If a student, or the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of a dependent student, moves out of Michigan during the time the student is enrolled as a full-time student at MSU, the student's in-state tuition status will be maintained as long as they continue to be enrolled. If a student moves out of Michigan for more than twelve (12) months while enrolled as a less than full-time student, the student will not be eligible for in-state tuition, unless the student presents clear and convincing evidence that they have maintained their domicile in Michigan despite the move.

A prospective student who qualifies for in-state tuition under Sections I.A. Dependent Students., II. Legal Permanent Resident Aliens, or III Michigan High School Attendance and Graduation above will be eligible for in-state tuition even if they attended a college or university outside of Michigan prior to enrolling at Michigan State University.

V. OTHER WAYS TO ESTABLISH ELIGIBILITY
Students who meet any of the following standards will receive in-state tuition:
Migrant Worker - If the parent of a dependent student, or an independent student (as defined by the Higher Education Act of 1965, Section 480(d)), has been employed as a migrant worker in Michigan for a minimum of two (2) months each year for three (3) of the five (5) years prior to the date of the proposed in-state tuition status, or for a minimum of three (3) months each year for two (2) of the five (5) years prior to the date of the proposed in-state tuition status, the student shall be classified as in-state. Proof and verification of employment is required. A migrant worker in Michigan is defined under these Regulations as an individual who travels from location to location pursuing seasonal agricultural or related industry employment. The term migrant worker does not include any family member of a person who owns or operates a farm, ranch, or other agricultural (or related industry) business.
Missionary - If a student, or the parent of a dependent student, is a missionary funded by a Michigan church, and the student or parent was domiciled in Michigan at the time they or their parent went on the mission.
MSU Employment - A student who is employed 100% full-time by the University, or whose spouse, or parent in the case of dependent student, is employed 100% full-time by the University.
MSU Graduate Student receives in-state tuition status during the period of their appointment as Graduate Assistants.
Peace Corps - A student who has served as a volunteer of the Peace Corps and who has satisfactorily completed their Peace Corps contract.
Uniformed Services - A student who, or whose spouse, or parent in the case of a dependent student:
(1) is serving on active duty in the United States Uniformed Services.
(2) is serving in the guard or reserves in one of those reserve components in a paid capacity; or
(3) has received an honorable discharge from one of those Services or reserve components.
VA Educational Assistance Programs - A person using educational assistance under either Chapter 30 (Montgomery GI Bill® - Active-Duty Program), Chapter 33 (Post-9/11 GI Bill®) of Title 38 of the United States Code, and/or the Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry Scholarship (38 U.S.C. § 3311(b)(9)), Chapter 31 (Veteran Readiness and Employment), Chapter 35  (The Survivors and Dependents Educational Assistance (DEA) program (Public Law 117-68 amending Title 38), (while attending Michigan State University, regardless of their formal state of residence).

VI. APPLICATION AND REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION
A student or the parent(s) or guardian(s) of a dependent student who is requesting reclassification based on Michigan domicile for tuition purposes must demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence their domicile is in the state of Michigan. Each request is reviewed individually, and a determination is made based on the supporting documentation and facts submitted by the applicant.

The review and determination of a student’s application will not be made until all required documentation has been submitted (as outlined below).

DEPENDENT STUDENT – 24 years of age and under; unmarried
  1. Application: An Application for Classification to In-State Fee Status.
  2. Statement of Explanation: A written statement explaining how the student meets the criteria for in-state tuition status as set forth in these Regulations.
  3. Student Photo Identification: A copy of student’s driver’s license, state identification card, or other official photo identification.
  4. Parent(s)/Guardian(s) Photo Identification: A copy of the parent’s driver’s license, state identification card, or other official photo identification.
  5. U.S. Permanent Residents:
    1. A copy of student’s U.S. Permanent Resident card.
    2. A copy of parent(s) U.S. Permanent Resident card.
  6. Guardianship – A copy of the complete, fully executed official court guardianship agreement, if applicable.
  7. Employment Verification: A letter from parent(s)’ or guardian(s)’ employer on company letterhead verifying current full-time employment, work location of employee, and includes employer’s physical address.
  8. Pay Stub: A copy of parent(s)’ or guardian(s)’ most recent pay stub(s) showing Michigan taxes being withheld.
  9. Federal and State Income Tax Returns: A copy of the first, second, and signature pages of parent(s) or guardian(s)’ most recent year’s federal and all state income tax returns (forms US 1040 and State 1040s) with:
    1. All accompanying W2s and Form 1099s; and
    2. Schedules C and E, (if self-employed).
  10. Michigan Domicile - A copy of a complete, fully executed lease agreement(s), mortgage, property deed, or property title for Michigan domicile.
  11. Severance of Out-of-State Ties:
    1. A complete, fully executed copy of proof of home sale (fully executed warranty deed, final closing statement or distribution statement) or proof of termination of lease agreement.
    2. Proof of relinquishment and/or dissolution of ownership or interest in any business, partnership, and the like, located outside the state of Michigan, if applicable.
NON-DEPENDENT STUDENT – 25 years of age and older; student is married
  1. Application: An Application for Classification to In-State Fee Status.
  2. Statement of Explanation: A written statement explaining how the student meets the criteria for in-state tuition status as set forth in these Regulations.
  3. Student Photo Identification: A copy of student’s driver’s license, state identification card, or other official photo identification.
  4. Spouse’s Photo Identification: A copy of the spouse’s driver’s license, state identification card, or other official photo identification, if based on spouse’s employment.
  5. U.S. Permanent Residents:
    1. A copy of student’s U.S. Permanent Resident card.
    2. A copy of spouse’s U.S. Permanent Resident card.
  6. Marriage Certificate: A copy of marriage certificate, if based on spouse’s employment.
  7. Employment Verification: A letter from student’s and/or spouse’s employer on company letterhead verifying current full-time employment, work location of employee, and includes employer’s physical address, if based on current full-time employment.
  8. Pay Stub: A copy of student’s and/or spouse’s most recent pay showing Michigan taxes being withheld, if based on current full-time employment.
  9. Federal and State Income Tax Returns: A copy of the first, second, and signature pages of most student’s and spouse’s (if based on spouse) most recent year’s federal and all state income tax returns (forms US 1040 and State 1040s) with:
    1. All accompanying W2s and Form 1099s; and
    2. Schedules C and E, (if self-employed).
  10. Michigan Domicile: A copy of a complete, fully executed lease agreement(s), mortgage, property deed, or property title providing evidence of Michigan domicile for at least the twelve (12) months immediately preceding the first day of classes of the semester for which student is seeking in-state tuition status.
  11. Severance of Out-of-State Ties:
    1. A complete, fully executed copy of proof of home sale (fully executed warranty deed, final closing statement or distribution statement) or proof of termination of lease agreement.
    2. Proof of relinquishment and/or dissolution of ownership or interest in any business, partnership, and the like, located outside the state of Michigan, if applicable.
ACTIVE-DUTY MILITARY OR HONORABLY DISCHARGED VETERAN STATUS
  1. Application: An Application for Classification to In-State Fee Status.
  2. Statement of Explanation: A written statement explaining how they meet the criteria for in-state tuition status as set forth in these Regulations.
  3. Student Photo Identification: A copy of student’s driver’s license, state identification card, or other official photo identification.
  4. Birth or Marriage Certificate: A copy of birth certificate (if dependent student) or marriage certificate (if spouse).
  5. Active-Duty Military: A copy of the most recent Leave and Earnings Statement (LES).
  6. Honorably Discharged Veteran: A copy of Release of Discharge from Active-Duty form indicating honorable discharge (DD-214).
MICHIGAN HIGH SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AND GRADUATION
  1. Application: An Application for Classification to In-State Fee Status.
  2. Statement of Explanation: A written statement explaining how they meet the criteria for in-state tuition status as set forth in these Regulations.
  3. Student Photo Identification: A copy of student’s driver’s license, state identification card, or other official photo identification.
  4. High School Transcript(s): A copy of student’s high school transcript(s), if not already on file.
ABSENCES FROM MICHIGAN
Moved For a Job, But Domiciled in Michigan
  1. Application: An Application for Classification to In-State Fee Status.
  2. Statement of Explanation: Provide a written statement explaining how the student meets the criteria for in-state tuition in accordance with these Regulations. 
  3. Student Photo Identification: A copy of student’s driver’s license or other official photo identification.
  4. Parent(s) Photo Identification: A copy of parents’ driver’s licenses (if dependent student).
  5. Passports: A copy of student and both parents’ passports.
  6. Employment Verification: A signed and dated letter from parent’s Employer on company letterhead indicating:
    1. Date full-time permanent employment began in Michigan.
    2. Location(S) outside of Michigan where employee has or is working.
    3. Duration of temporary out-of-state assignment.
    4. Will employee be returning to Michigan at the end of out-of-state assignment.
    5. Company contact name, address, phone number, and email address.
  7. Federal and State Income Tax Returns: A copy of the first, second, and signature pages of student’s most recent year’s federal and state income tax returns (Form 1040 and State-1040) with:
    1. All accompanying W2s and/or Schedule 1 included with Form 1040.
    2. Schedules C and E, if self-employed.
    3. Schedule K-1 (Form 1065) Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc.
  8. Michigan Domicile: A copy of a complete, fully executed property deed, quit claim deed, land contract, mortgage agreement, property title or lease agreement(s) for parents’ permanent Michigan residence.
  9. Michigan Property Tax Statements: A copy of the latest paid property tax statement for parents’ permanent Michigan residence.
  10. Out-of-State/Foreign Domicile: A complete, fully executed copy of proof of home sale (final closing/distribution statement, warranty deed or termination of lease agreement where parents are currently residing.
Moved Out of Michigan After Completion of Student’s Sophomore Year
  1. Application: An Application for Classification to In-State Fee Status. https://reg.msu.edu/Read/Fee Class App.pdf
  2. Statement of Explanation: Provide a written statement explaining how the student meets the criteria for in-state tuition in accordance with these Regulations. 
  3. Student Photo Identification: A copy of student’s driver’s license or other official photo identification.
  4. Parent(s) Driver’s License: A copy of both parents’ driver’s licenses or other official photo identification.
  5. Michigan Income Tax Returns: A copy of ten (10) years of parent’s Michigan income tax returns prior to departure from Michigan (sophomore year and prior). 
  6. Michigan Domicile: A copy of a complete, fully executed property deed, quit claim deed, land contract, mortgage agreement, property title or lease agreement(s) covering same ten (10) year period (sophomore year and prior) for parents’ Michigan domicile.
  7. Michigan High School Transcript(s): A copy of Michigan high school transcripts.
MIGRANT WORKER, MISSIONARY, PEACE CORPS, OR MSU FACULTY/STAFF EMPLOYMENT
  1. Application: An Application for Classification to In-State Fee Status.
  2. Statement of Explanation: A written statement explaining how they meet the criteria for in-state tuition status as set forth in these Regulations.
  3. Student Photo Identification: A copy of student’s driver’s license, state identification card, or other official photo identification.
Upon receipt of items 1-3, the student will be notified by the application reviewer specifying what additional supporting documentation and information is required.

The review and determination of a student’s application will not be made until all required documentation has been submitted (as outlined above).

The application and documentation should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar, Hannah Administration Building, 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150, East Lansing, MI 48824 or email to feeclass@msu.edu in .pdf format at least thirty (30) days before the start of the semester for which in-state tuition status is sought.
  • In-state fee status applies to only entire semesters. Students will not be granted in-state fee status for part of a semester.
  • The application and documentation will not be returned. The student is advised to keep a copy for their records.
  • The student will be notified by the Review Committee if additional documentation or information is required.
  • The average processing time is approximately four (4) weeks after all documents have been received.
  • The student will be notified by email when a determination has been made.
Applications are reviewed by the Review Committee comprised of at least three (3) members, including an associate registrar. In cases where the documentation appears to be unclear or incomplete, a member of the Review Committee will attempt to contact the student and explain the need for further clarification and/or supportive documentation.

VIII. MISCELLANEOUS
The University will correct any errors that have occurred in determining eligibility for in-state tuition. When a student provides evidence that they were eligible for in-state tuition in a prior semester, the student may seek retroactive in-state tuition status and a refund of the out-of-state tuition differential. The student should send a written request with supporting documentation to the Office of the Registrar, Hannah Administration Building, 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-2603, or email to feeclass@msu.edu.

Falsification of records is prohibited. According to Article 5.01 of the University's General Student Regulations, "No student shall provide false information for the purpose of gaining benefit for oneself or others to any office, agency, or individual acting on behalf of the University." The University reserves the right to audit enrolled or prospective students at any time regarding eligibility for in-state tuition.

IX. APPEAL OF A DECISION OF INELIGIBILITY FOR IN-STATE TUITION
A student desiring to challenge the decision of the Review Committee shall have the right to appeal the determination. The appeal should consist of a written statement and any supporting documentation explaining why the decision of the Review Committee is wrong.

The appeal will be reviewed by the Out-of-State Fees Committee. The Out-of-State Fees Committee consists of the Executive Vice President, Administrative Services, Chairperson; the Vice President for Student Affairs and Services; the Associate Controller; the Dean of the Graduate School; the Dean of Undergraduate Studies; one (1) undergraduate student representing ASMSU; one (1) graduate student representing COGS; the Director of Admissions, ex officio; and the University Registrar or their designee, ex officio. Ex officio members are non-voting.

If a student's appeal is denied by the Out-of-State Fees Committee, the student may ask to appear in person before the Out-of-State Fees Committee to further clarify their position. A student wishing to appear in person should file a written request with the Office of the Registrar. The request should specify the documentation about which the student intends to speak. Representatives or other individuals will not be allowed to appear with the student unless approved prior to the meeting.

Housing and Dining

Living on campus at Michigan State University is an integral part of the Spartan experience. The shared experience of living on-campus is not only a rich tradition at MSU; it also comes with countless options and benefits.

Michigan State University offers a variety of on-campus housing options for undergraduate and graduate students. There are 27 residence halls and two apartment communities, including the 1855 Place student housing complex with apartments and townhouses for students and students with families. Students who live on campus are at the center of all that MSU has to offer.

The MSU Neighborhood Model fosters an environment that promotes both student development and academic success. The model combines the residential experience with critical student support services that help our students persist toward graduation. The MSU Neighborhood Model has revolutionized the manner in which these services are delivered on a large campus, breaking campus down into smaller neighborhoods where students can feel more at home and get the support they need. Services are delivered in our Engagement Centers and residence halls, right where students live. 

On-campus living at MSU is all about providing students with a safe, secure and hassle-free living environment that will allow them to focus on being academically successful and making the most of their Spartan experience. On campus, everything from utilities and laundry to cable and internet is included. On-campus living also provides Spartans access to our award winning Culinary Services venues. More information about on-campus housing options and rates is available at liveon.msu.edu.

Safety on campus is our top priority and MSU takes the safety and security of our residents very seriously. Many of our residence halls are unique in that they house residential space, dining halls, offices and academic spaces such as labs and classrooms.  An electronic door access system is in place in our residence halls 24 hours a day, seven days a week, requiring students to scan their MSU ID cards to enter through exterior doors (other than main entrances) and interior doors that lead to living wings. The elevators are restricted with electronic access to residents only. Exterior entrances that lead to living wings remain locked 24 hours a day. More information about on-campus housing options and rates is available at liveon.msu.edu

 


Residence Education Staff

Each residence hall has a team comprised of a community director, neighborhood administrative coordinators, community support staff, residence directors or assistant community directors, resident assistants, facilities building workers, and service center representatives. These staff members are responsible for community building, linking students to support services across campus, and responding to emergencies that may arise in the building. 

 


Residence Halls Association

The MSU Residence Halls Association (RHA) is the on-campus student government at Michigan State University. Representing more than 14,000 students, MSU RHA is one of the largest Residence Halls Associations in the country. MSU RHA is dedicated to improving the on-campus living experience, and providing many services to students. Campus Center Cinemas, RHA TV, and a number of on-campus events are all services that are provided to the students by RHA.


Living-Learning and Residential College Program

Michigan State University’s living-learning, academic and special interest programs allow students who share similar academic interests to live together in a designated residence hall or on a particular residence hall floor. Many of the living-learning options allow students to attend class with the same group of peers in their residence hall, which enhances friendships, networking and facilitated ease of gatherings and study time. For more information on living-learning communities at MSU, visit liveon.msu.edu

 


Residence Halls and Apartment Application Procedure

New students, including transfers and graduate students, receive housing application information after being admitted to the university. Applications for housing at MSU are completed online through the My Housing portal, which is accessible via liveon.msu.edu. Any questions regarding the housing application process should be directed to the Housing Assignments Office at 1-517-884-5483, 1-877-954-8366 or liveon@msu.edu.

 


Summer Housing - Residence Halls

Housing is available for summer session, although reservations are handled separately from those for the regular academic year. Students can apply for summer session in the middle of the spring semester. At the end of summer session, students must move out of their summer residence hall and move to their fall placement.


Off-Campus Housing

Staff members in the office provide general advice and information to persons with problems arising from off-campus housing situations. Students are also encouraged to visit offcampushousing.msu.edu for local listings and general information. Off-campus dining plans are available for purchase.


Fraternity and Sorority Community

Many of Michigan State University's 61 nationally and internationally affiliated fraternities and sororities offer chapter houses in which their members may live in accordance with the Group Housing program. Chapter members are responsible for the business aspects of managing a chapter house, as well as providing activities addressing leadership development, community service, sports and recreation, social life, alumni relations, accountability and responsibility for their members. For more information on this collegiate living experience, contact Fraternity and Sorority Life at 1-517-355-8286.


Cooperative Living Units

A unique type of living experience for Michigan State University students is provided in student housing cooperatives. Students own and operate their own houses and are responsible for governance, maintenance, budgeting and meal planning. Cooperative principles affirm democratic control and open membership to any interested student. The housing cooperatives are all located near the campus and vary in size from 12 to 50 members. Additional information about cooperative housing may be obtained from at www.spartan.coop.


Religious Living Units

In general, living in religious living units is similar to living in other residences with the addition of a denominational religious experience. These units include Living ROCK (men), East Lansing Student Living Center (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints), and the Hillel Jewish Student Center.

 


Eat At State

MSU provides dining options that support students’ active lifestyle. Silver, Gold and Platinum dining plans offer unlimited access to all-you-care-to-eat dining halls, plus 12 Combo-X-Change meals per week. Gold and Platinum also have varying levels of guest passes and Spartan Cash included.

Combo-X-Change (CX) is an additional meal swipe which provides access to various dining and retail locations including Grab and Go and mobile ordering so you can use them for a meal on the go at participating locations. 

CX locations include Sparty’s mini-markets, Sparty’s Market, The Workshop at STEM, Starbucks, Panera Bread at Minskoff Pavilion, FujiSan sushi, Woody’s Oasis, Panda Express and Subway at the International Center, State Room restaurant in the Kellogg Center for lunch, as well as mobile ordering and grab and go locations.

Wherever you dine on campus, your health and safety are our top priority. Each campus neighborhood has an executive chef overseeing the creation of daily menus, including selections to support ovo-lacto vegetarianism, vegan, dairy-free and gluten-free diets as well as kosher and halal dining options.

If you have a food allergy or intolerance, we encourage you to reach out to our registered dietitian at dietitians@rhs.msu.edu prior to coming to campus. The dietitian is available to provide expertise and collaborate with the chefs and dining hall managers to identify safe menu options that fit your needs. You’ll also want to check out our newest dining hall, Thrive at Riverwalk Market at Owen Hall. This unique location is Certified Free From™ the Big 8 allergens (eggs, fish, milk, peanuts, shellfish, soy, tree nuts and wheat) plus gluten. Our nationally recognized food allergy program creates a personalized experience for diners.

 


For Further Housing Information

University Housing Assignments Office

Housing Assignments Office
1855 Place
550 S. Harrison Road
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48823
Telephone:  1-517-884-LIVE (5483) or
877-9 LIVE ON (954-8366)
E-mail: liveon@msu.edu
Web: liveon.msu.edu

Culinary Services

Culinary Services Office
1855 Place
550 S. Harrison Road
East Lansing, MI 48823
Telephone:  1-517-884-0660
E-mail: info@eatatstate.com
Web: eatatstate.com

Off-Campus Housing

Student and Community Relations
555 E. Circle Drive, Room 169
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824-1113
Telephone:  1-517-432-7527


University Housing Policy

Michigan State University's housing system seeks to provide an educational environment which is maximally conducive to the learning process of students. Consistent with this philosophy, a variety of living options supported by student fees, is made available in university housing. The university has requirements for on-campus residence to promote an optimal learning environment for students. Any undergraduate student enrolled for seven or more credits at Michigan State University for a semester, summer session excluded, is subject to the university's housing regulations. Compliance with the university housing policy is a condition of enrollment.

 


Administrative Ruling-University Housing Requirements and Procedures

In accordance with the University Housing Policy, the following stipulations apply:

On-Campus Housing Requirement. Subject to the exceptions below, as a condition of enrollment, first year and second year students (including transfer students, regardless of the number of transfer credits granted) must live in on-campus housing for the first four semesters they are enrolled, summer term excluded. Failure to adhere to the on-campus housing requirement may result in termination of enrollment.

Exceptions to On-Campus Housing Requirement. The on-campus housing requirement above is subject to the following exceptions:

  1. Married students.
  2. Students who will be at least twenty years of age by the first day of classes of fall semester. 
  3. Veterans with one or more years of active service. 
  4. Students living with family, parent(s) or legal guardian. 
  5. Students taking 6 or less credits during the semester in question. 

Any student seeking an exception to the on-campus housing requirement, must apply for the exception prior to moving into university housing. The procedures for an exception can be obtained by contacting the Office of Student and Community Relations, Student Services Building, 555 E. Circle Drive, Room 169,
East Lansing, MI, 48824, at 1-517-355-8286 or visiting studentlife.msu.edu.


Enforcement

Those students for whom the housing requirement is a condition of enrollment will be asked to verify their adherence to it. Failure to maintain the required residency could result in termination of enrollment. Enforcement of the housing regulations is the responsibility of the Division of Student Life and Engagement. The housing requirement does not apply to students during a semester in which they are enrolled for 6 or fewer credits or during the summer. In any subsequent semester during which the student carries 7 or more credits, the requirement will again become applicable.


Address

Every student is required to report his or her correct current address at the time of registration and to report any change of address thereafter. Failure to register the actual address at which he or she is living, or failure to notify the university of a change of address within five class days after the change becomes effective, will be considered as falsification of university records. Change of off-campus address is made in the Office of the Registrar or via Stulnfo. Change of on-campus address is made in the student's My Housing account. Holds can be placed on accounts not in compliance.


Housing Contract

The Residence Education and Housing Services Housing Contracts is in effect for the period stated in the terms of the Contract. Any student, regardless of class standing, is obligated to fulfill the duration of the Housing Contract unless an authorized release is obtained. (Note: Application for release may be made through Residence Education and Housing Services.) This regulation applies to all students (freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, special and graduate) who enter into a contract for on-campus housing.


Assignment

Only those persons who have received official housing assignments may live in university housing.

 


Special Permission

Prior to moving into university housing, any new student may apply for an exception to the housing requirements. Information on the special permission procedure and criteria for exceptions can be obtained by contacting the Office of Student and Community Relations, 555 E. Circle Drive, Room 169. Applications will be considered by a committee appointed by the Senior Vice President for Student Life and Engagement. A student may appeal the decision of the committee to the Senior Vice President for Student Life and Engagement. Off-campus living units that were recognized by the university as 'supervised' housing units in the spring of 1983 will continue to be eligible to house students consistent with past practice. Specific conditions that will ensure this eligibility will be developed by the Senior Vice President for Student Life and Engagement and in consultation with appropriate off-campus living units. The residents of these units must be advised that the unit is neither supervised by nor under the jurisdiction of the university and that the university assumes no responsibility for the program, the facility, or persons associated with the unit.


General Procedures and Regulations


Institutional Evaluation and Assessment

As members of a learning community, students may be asked to participate in periodic and ongoing institutional self-studies designed to promote program improvement.  Michigan State University continually assesses itself in order to evaluate the effectiveness of its programs.  Students are expected to participate in these assessment efforts should they be selected to do so.

 


Michigan State University Faculty

A full-time faculty member of Michigan State University may not carry course work in residence, or in absentia, amounting to more than an average of four course credits a semester with a maximum of eight credits during fall and spring. There is no maximum number of master's thesis or doctoral dissertation research credits that may be carried each semester. See Admission of Faculty Members of Michigan State University to Graduate Study in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.


Student

A student is a person enrolled or participating in a collegiate-level, University-sponsored program, or course, regardless of program level; full-time or part-time status; credit, degree, or certificate awarded; location; or mode of instruction. A person remains a student until graduation or completion of the program, permanent dismissal, or non-attendance for three full, consecutive semesters (including summer semester). This definition includes a person who is on a leave of absence, withdraws, recess, or graduates after an alleged violation of student conduct policies.
 


Student Name

LEGAL NAME. This is also referred to as Primary Name. Students are required to provide their legal name at the time of application and to process official name changes while enrolled, as appropriate. Name change requests must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar with appropriate documentation. Documentation consists of a current driver’s license, official state ID card, Social Security card, court order of legal name change, current passport, or official proof of identity certified by U.S. embassy abroad or by the appropriate foreign embassy in the United States.

DIPLOMA NAME. Students indicate their diploma name on the Michigan State University Application for Graduation. The student name listed on a diploma or certificate must match the legal name as it is recorded on the student’s official university record, with the following exceptions: option of first name or initial; option of middle name or initial; inclusion of former or maiden name(s); and inclusion of proper capitalization and accentuation of name.

PREFERRED NAME. The university recognizes that many of its students use names other than their legal names to identify themselves. Students may indicate their preferred first name on the Michigan State University Application for Admission or by accessing My Profile at student.msu.edu.

Once established, preferred name will be used across university systems where possible. The university reserves the right to remove a preferred name if it is used inappropriately, including but not limited to, avoiding a legal obligation or misrepresentation. The legal name will continue to be used for certain university records, documents, and business processes such as reporting, financial aid, official transcripts, and other records where use of legal name is required by law or university policy.

Students may update or remove their preferred name via student.msu.edu or in person at the Office of the Registrar, Hannah Administration Building, 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824-2603.


Attendance

No person is allowed to attend a class unless officially enrolled on a credit or non-credit basis with the appropriate fees paid. Students who attend, participate, and strive to complete course requirements without formal enrollment will not receive credit for their work.

There is no university-wide regulation requiring class attendance. However, attendance is an essential and intrinsic element of the educational process. In any course in which attendance is necessary to the achievement of a clearly defined set of course objectives, it may be a valid consideration in determining the student's grade. It is the responsibility of the instructor to define the policy for attendance at the beginning of the course.

REPORTING NON-ATTENDANCE. In compliance with federal regulations governing financial aid and veterans education benefits, instructors are required to report students who stop attending or who have never attended class. After the first week of classes, through the middle of the term of instruction, instructors who identify a non-attending student should notify their departmental office. Upon receiving a report of non-attendance, departmental representatives are encouraged to initiate an administrative drop.

Attendance is defined as physical attendance or participation in an academically-related activity, including but not limited to the submission of an assignment, an examination, participation in a study group or an online discussion. Instructors who do not take attendance may utilize key assessment points (e.g., projects, papers, mid-term exams, and discussions) as benchmarks for participation.

DROP FOR NON-ATTENDANCE. Students may be dropped from a course for non-attendance by a departmental administrative drop after the fourth class period, or the fifth class day of the term of instruction, whichever occurs first.

CLASS NOTES AND UNIVERSITY SUPPLIED MATERIALS. As a condition of continued course enrollment and allowed class attendance, a student will refrain from commercializing notes of class lectures and university-supplied materials, by direct sale or by contract with a third party or otherwise, without the express written permission of the instructor. Students may be removed from a class only after a hearing in the department or school, as described in the Student Rights and Responsibilities at Michigan State University.

FIELD TRIPS. Field trips involving absence from classes must be authorized in advance by the dean of the college in which the course is given. The cost of field trips that are part of organized courses of instruction must be borne by the participating students and are additional to the usual course fees.


Change of Section within a Course

Students who must change from one section to another in the same course may do so using the enrollment system through the first 1/14th of the term of instruction (the 5th day of classes in the fall and spring semesters).  After the period ends, changes of section must be made in the department responsible for teaching the course.

 

 


Change of Enrollment

Students are expected to complete the courses in which they register. If a change is necessary, it may be made only with the appropriate approvals as explained below.
ADD AND DROP PERIOD. Students may add courses using the enrollment system through the first 1/14th of the term of instruction (the 5th day of classes in the fall and spring semesters). Students may drop courses using the enrollment system through the middle of the term of instruction.
CHANGE OF OPTION FOR CR-NC (CREDIT-NO CREDIT) GRADING. Choice of the CR-NC grading system must be communicated by the student to the Office of the Registrar by the middle of the semester date in the fall and spring semesters and may not be changed after that date.
CHANGE OF OPTION FOR VISITOR. Choice of enrollment in a credit course as a visitor on a non-credit basis must be made no later than the first 1/14th of the term of instruction (the 5th day of classes in the fall and spring semesters) in the Office of the Registrar.
TO ADD A COURSE AFTER THE ADD AND DROP PERIOD. Normally, no course may be added after the designated period for adding courses. Any add after this period must be processed beginning with the department offering the course. Final approval rests with the associate dean of the student’s college  or if not yet admitted to a college, the associate dean of the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative.
TO DROP A COURSE OR WITHDRAW FROM THE UNIVERSITY AFTER THE MIDDLE OF THE TERM OF INSTRUCTION. A student may drop a course or withdraw after the middle of the term of instruction only to correct errors in the enrollment or because of events of catastrophic impact, such as serious personal illness. If the student is passing the course, or there is no basis for assignment of a grade at the time of the drop, a W grade will be assigned. If failing, a 0.0 (or N in a P-N graded course) will be assigned. The course will remain on the student’s academic record.

Undergraduate Students: To initiate a late drop or withdrawal, the student must obtain approval from the office of the associate dean of their college or if not yet admitted to college, the associate dean of the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative. Exceptions are James Madison College, Lyman Briggs College, and the Residential College in Arts and Humanities.

Graduate Students: To initiate a late drop or withdrawal, students must obtain approval from their advisor or major professor and their graduate program director. This is especially important if appointed as a graduate assistant.

DROPPING ALL COURSES. See the statement on Withdrawal from the University.


Cancellation of Enrollment

Cancellation of enrollment includes the administrative cancellation of a student's registration due to nonpayment of fees, or because of academic recess or dismissal. Courses in which the student is enrolled will be deleted from the official record. The cancellation of a student's registration may be processed by the Office of the Controller or the Office of the Registrar.

 

 


Withdrawal from the University

WITHDRAWAL PRIOR TO THE MIDDLE OF THE TERM OF INSTRUCTION. A withdrawal from the university occurs when students drop all their courses within a semester. Students may drop all their courses through the middle of the term of instruction using the online enrollment system or in person at the Office of the Registrar, 150 Administration Building. For withdrawals that occur before the middle of the term of instruction, courses in which the student is enrolled will be deleted from the official record.

Undergraduate students are strongly advised to seek guidance regarding the impact of withdrawal from the university by contacting either the associate dean of their major college or academic advisor. For most students who have fewer than 56 credit hours, the Associate Dean’s function is served by the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative (NSSC). Exceptions are James Madison College, Lyman Briggs College, and the Residential College in Arts and Humanities. Graduate students should consult with their advisor, major professor, or graduate program director; this is especially important if appointed as a graduate assistant.

Additionally:

  • Fees are subject to refund according to the refund policy.
  • A student living in a residence hall should consult the manager regarding the policy on the refund of room and board fees.
  • A student living in an off-campus organized living unit should consult the individual unit for policies regarding room and board refunds.
  • A graduate student appointed as graduate assistant forfeits their assistantship upon withdrawal from the university.
  • Any student whose enrollment at this university is interrupted for any reason so that they have not been enrolled for three consecutive semesters, including the summer sessions should submit a readmission to the Office of the Registrar at www.reg.msu.edu.

WITHDRAWAL AFTER THE MIDDLE OF THE TERM OF INSTRUCTION. A student may drop a course or withdraw after the middle of the term of instruction only to correct errors in the enrollment or because of events of catastrophic impact, such as serious personal illness. If the student is passing the course, or there is no basis for assignment of a grade at the time of the drop, a W grade will be assigned. If failing, a 0.0 (or N in a P-N graded course) will be assigned. The course will remain on the student’s academic record.

Undergraduate Students: To initiate a late withdrawal, the student must obtain approval from the office of the associate dean of their college or the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative. Exceptions are James Madison College, Lyman Briggs College, and the Residential College in Arts and Humanities.

Graduate students should consult with their advisor, major professor, or graduate program director; this is especially important if appointed as a graduate assistant.

There is no formal procedure for withdrawal at the end of a semester; however, a student living in university housing should notify the manager of the appropriate unit.

UNAUTHORIZED. Students who leave the university during a semester or summer session without officially dropping their courses will be reported as having failed those courses and will forfeit any fees or deposits paid to the university. The withdrawal procedure will not take place automatically for the student who leaves campus because of illness, of either one's self or family member, or for interim or final suspension for disciplinary reasons, but must be initiated by the student. Fees are subject to refund according to the refund policy.

INVOLUNTARY. Students who are called into the armed forces during the semester should submit a copy of their orders to the Office of the Registrar for appropriate action.

ACADEMIC RECESS OR DISMISSAL. If a student is academically recessed or dismissed, courses in subsequent semesters are dropped without grades and fees are subject to refund according to the refund policy.


Examinations

In keeping with university practice, entry into, and participation in, course examinations are controlled through electronic and visual means and by proctored examination site procedures.

In certain courses, such as those offered online, an individual student may be required to arrange to take examinations in a proctored environment on-campus or off-campus. Any costs associated with taking such proctored examinations are the responsibility of the student. The Michigan State University Testing Office is a proctored-testing site for distance learning, www.testingoffice.msu.edu/. It is a member of the Consortium of College Testing Centers which is a free referral service provided by the National College Testing Association to facilitate distance learning, www.ncta-testing.org.


Final Examination Policy

During the final week of each fall and spring semester all courses shall meet for one 2-hour period. The  Final Examination Policy is available at https://reg.msu.edu/ROInfo/Calendar/FinalExam.aspx. During summer sessions, final examinations are scheduled in the last class sessions.  This period should be used for examination, discussion, summarizing the course, obtaining student evaluation of the course instruction, or any other appropriate activity designed to advance the student's education. If an instructor requires a written report or take-home examination in place of a final examination, it shall not be due before the final examination period scheduled for that course. Exceptions to this paragraph may be approved by the department or school chairperson, or in a college without departments, by the dean.

In the event that a final examination is deemed appropriate by the instructor for in-person hybrid and online synchronous classes, it may not be scheduled at any time other than the date and hour listed in Schedule of Courses. Online asynchronous classes must administer final exams remotely/online, if a final is given.

Any deviations from the final examination schedule must be approved by the Office of the Registrar based on the recommendation of the assistant/associate dean of the college responsible for the course offering.

No student should be required to take more than two examinations during any one day of the final examination period. Students who have more than two examinations scheduled during one calendar day during the final examination period may contact the Academic Student Affairs Office in their colleges for assistance in arranging for an alternate time for one of the three examinations.

Faculty members shall schedule office hours during the final examination period (or in some other way attempt to make themselves accessible to their students) as they do in the other weeks of the semester.

Common final examinations are scheduled in certain courses with several class sections. In case of a conflict in time between such an examination and a regularly scheduled course examination, the latter has priority. The department or school giving the common  examination must arrange for a make-up examination.

A student absent from a final examination without a satisfactory explanation will receive a grade of 0.0 on the numerical system, NC on the CR-NC system, or N in the case of a course authorized for grading on the P-N system. Students unable to take a final examination because of illness or other reason over which they have no control should notify the associate deans of their colleges immediately.

For information on other examinations, see the Undergraduate Education and Graduate Education sections of this catalog.


Courses

All currently approved courses can be found in online Course Descriptions at: https://reg.msu.edu/Courses/Search.aspx.

For current scheduling information for all courses, visit the Schedule of Courses at www.schedule.msu.edu.


Course Numbers

001-099 Non-Credit Courses

Courses with these numbers are offered by the university to permit students to remediate deficiencies in previous training or to improve their facility in certain basic skills without earning credit.

For information about remedial-developmental-preparatory courses, consult the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog.

100-299 Undergraduate Courses

Courses with these numbers are for undergraduate students. They carry no graduate credit, although graduate students may be admitted to such courses in order to make up prerequisites or to gain a foundation for advanced courses.

For information about remedial-developmental-preparatory courses, consult the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog.

300-499 Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Courses with these numbers are for advanced undergraduate students. They constitute the advanced portion of an undergraduate program leading to the bachelor's degree. A graduate student may carry 400-level courses for credit upon approval of the student's major department or school. In exceptional cases, a graduate student may petition the dean of his or her college, in writing, for approval of a 300-level course for graduate credit.

500-699 Graduate-Professional Courses

Courses with these numbers are courses in the graduate-professional programs. A graduate student may carry these courses for credit with approval of the major department or school.

800-899 Graduate Courses

Courses with these numbers are for graduate students. Advanced undergraduates with Honors College status or a grade-point average in their total programs equal to or greater than the minimum requirement for graduation with honors may be admitted to 800-899 courses. The student must obtain approval of the relevant department. More than half of the credits of the total required for a master's degree shall be taken at the 800-and 900-level except as specifically exempted by the dean of the college.

900-999 Advanced Graduate Courses

Courses with these numbers are exclusively for graduate students and primarily for advanced graduate students. A master's degree student may take these courses with the approval of the major department or school, with the exception of courses numbered 999 (doctoral dissertation research). Admission to a doctoral degree program is a prerequisite of all courses numbered 999.


Credits

Courses at Michigan State University are given on a  "semester" basis, and credits earned are semester credits. To convert semester credits to the “term” or “quarter” basis employed in certain other institutions, multiply by 3/2. To convert term credits to semester credits, multiply by 2/3.

Each course usually carries a specific number of credits based upon the number of instructional contact hours and study hours required each week per semester. The earning of a credit requires, as a minimum, one instructor-student contact hour per week per semester plus two hours of study per contact hour; OR two hours of laboratory contact hours per week per semester, plus one additional hour spent in report writing and study; OR other combinations of contact and study hours which constitute an equivalent of these experiences. In all courses taught in the time frame of the regular semester, regardless of format, provision will be made for contact hours and/or study hours which reflect optimal use of the class and study time provided for in the official university calendar. In courses in other time frames, provision will be made for contact hours and study time in a combination, which is equivalent to the semester experience.

The number of credits normally carried in a semester is defined in the Undergraduate Education and Graduate Education sections of this catalog.

Persons who are assessed fees for 7 or more credits (6 or more credits for doctoral students) in a semester:

  1. Are subject to the housing regulations as stated in University Housing Policy.
  2. May utilize the facilities of the Olin Health Center. Information on services available and the charges made may be obtained at the Olin Health Center.
  3. May purchase football, basketball, and/or hockey season tickets for themselves and their spouses at 50 percent of the public rate.
  4. Are eligible for free admission to other regularly scheduled athletic events.
  5. Are eligible for student discounts on series tickets to professional performing arts events at the Wharton Center for Performing Arts.
  6. Are eligible to purchase one guest ticket to professional performing arts events at the Wharton Center for Performing Arts and Institute for Arts and Culture. One validated student ID card must be presented with every two student-rate tickets when attending a performance.


Variable Credit Courses

For each variable credit course, the range of credits for which a student may enroll in a given semester and the maximum number of credits that a student may earn in a course with a reenrollment provision shall be specified.

 


Transfer Courses and Credits

Acceptance of courses and credits deemed suitable for transfer to Michigan State University is determined by faculty in the department, school, or college responsible for instruction in the subject area. Among factors influencing the determination of acceptability are accreditation status, comparable academic quality, and the relationship of the course to other course offerings in the primary administrative unit and other academic units at Michigan State University, and the basis for student performance evaluation in the course. For current course equivalencies, visit www.transfer.msu.edu.

Credit for summer and other non-degree programs offered on campuses of officially recognized international institutions may be subject to an additional review. A transcript demonstrating a completed course of study may be required to determine the transferability of credit.

For Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021 or Summer 2021 semesters ONLY: - Transfer equivalency policy - Students wanting to transfer a course from another institution into MSU that did not offer S/NS grading or its equivalence during the spring 2020, fall 2020, spring 2021 or summer 2021 terms may be allowed to transfer that course if they received a 1.0 or higher as a satisfactory (S) grade.

For information on transfer credit beyond sophomore standing, visit www.reg.msu.edu/AcademicPrograms/Text.aspx?Section=110#s228.

Course Formats and Credits

The formats described in this document apply to courses in which credits are earned. (For the definition of a credit, refer to Credits.)

In all courses for credit, regardless of format, there will be instructor evaluation of individual learning. In this document, instructor is defined as a person authorized to teach the course by the administrator of the academic unit that administers the course.

The formats acceptable for courses offered for credit are those listed below. Two or more of the formats listed may be combined; for example, lecture and laboratory, discussion and online and/or lecture and hybrid.

Lecture
Definition:  A regularly scheduled class in which the instructor takes the dominant role and the primary emphasis is on transmitting a body of knowledge or information and explaining ideas or principles. Student comments or questions will be accommodated as circumstances permit. In some courses, students may be expected to participate in classroom activities by means appropriate to the subject matter, such as discussion, performance, etc. Information regarding required text and reading list is provided.

Recitation
Definition: A regularly scheduled interactive class in which the instructor supplements lectures by clarifying concepts and responding to student questions. Students may be expected to participate in classroom activities by means appropriate to the subject matter through discussion, solving problems, or group learning. Papers, projects, etc., may be assigned.

Discussion
Definition:  A regularly scheduled class in which a group of students, under the direction of the instructor, considers predetermined topics, issues, or problems and exchanges evidence, analyses, reactions, and conclusions about them with one another. Papers, projects, etc., may be assigned.  A list of topics for discussion; basic texts, reading list, or other materials are specified. Enrollment normally limited.

Seminar
Definition:  A regularly scheduled class in which a small group of students is engaged, under the leadership of the instructor, in research or advanced study. Topics may be interdisciplinary or highly specialized. Maximal opportunity for peer exchange is provided. Instructor provides broad outline of possible topics and procedures. Enrollment normally limited to 15 students.

Laboratory
Definition:  A regularly scheduled class with primary emphasis on learning by doing or observing, with the burden of course activity placed on the student, under the direction and supervision of the instructor, for the purpose of giving first-hand experience, developing and practicing skills, translating theory into practice, and developing, testing, and applying principles.  Manuals, needed materials, instruments, equipment, and/or tools are provided, or recommendations are made for their acquisition.

Studio
Definition:  A regularly scheduled class with primary emphasis on student activity leading to skill development and the enhancement and encouragement of the student's artistic growth. Needed materials, instruments, equipment, and/or tools are provided, or recommendations are made for their acquisition. Evaluation of individual learning may include public display of proficiency and/or evaluation by faculty other than the student's instructor. Each student receives from the instructor an end-of-semester assessment of accomplishment.

Online
Definition:   A class in which all instruction is delivered in an online environment. Online courses are classified as on-campus courses. Course content may be delivered in one of the following formats: Asynchronous instruction provides learning materials and requirements for online interaction with faculty and other students. The course will not have required attendance at regularly scheduled meeting times. Includes deadlines for completion of learning objectives and testing (may be proctored) to meet course requirements. Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled meeting times as posted on the schedule of courses page.  A synchronous class has required attendance and includes deadlines for completion of learning objectives and testing (may be proctored) to meet course requirements.

Hybrid (Blended)
Definition:  A class that blends online instruction with required or scheduled in-person contact, including examinations, laboratories, etc. At least 50% of the class is delivered through online instruction. Proctored examinations, texts, reading lists, and/or other materials are stipulated. Hybrid courses with on-campus meetings are classified as on-campus courses.

In the following course formats (except master's thesis research and doctoral dissertation research), a minimum combined total of 30 instructor-student contact hours and student class/study/work hours per credit per semester is expected. The division among these hours will be determined by the instructor, in consultation, as needed, with other qualified supervisors.

Workshop
Definition:  An organized learning experience with the same purposes and methods as the laboratory or studio, usually offered in a concentrated period shorter than a semester. Broad outline of possible activities and procedures is provided.

Institute
Definition:  An organized learning experience which brings together specialists in a given area for instruction for a concentrated period shorter than a semester. Broad outline of possible topics and procedures is provided.

Field Study
Definition:  A learning experience arranged by an instructor for a student or group of students to carry out a project outside the classroom by observation, participation in a work experience, or field research.  Advance planning, involving instructor and students, for activity are required.

Professional Practicum
Definition:  Professional practice under supervision of an instructor, assisted, where necessary, by additional experienced professionals. Broad outline of possible topics and procedures is provided.

Clinical Clerkship
Definition:  An organized learning experience which employs professional practice as a means to acquire clinical skills and apply knowledge. Broadens knowledge acquired in prior course work by providing additional instruction and experiences. Activities include supervised clinical practice, small-group instruction, lecture, independent study, etc. Instruction is delivered by multiple faculty and/or other qualified professionals in a campus or community-based clinical facility (hospital, ambulatory care center, health professional's office, practice environment, etc.) Objectives, instructional materials, and evaluation procedures are determined by faculty assigned to the clerkship.

Internship
Definition: Professional activity, under general supervision of an experienced professional, in a job situation which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Specific job description must be approved by instructor or instructional unit. Evaluation by instructor with assistance of supervisor.

Teaching Internship
Definition: Sustained observation and practice in a classroom under supervision of an experienced teacher and a university field supervisor.  Careful advance planning involving a university field supervisor, the school system and supervising teacher, as well as procedures for evaluation by the field supervisor, with the assistance of the supervising teacher are required.

Independent Study
Definition: Planned study, highly individualized, which is not addressable through any other format. Advance planning between instructor and student, with goals, scope of the project, and evaluation method are specified in writing. At least two contact hours are required for the first credit of Independent Study. Contact hours thereafter are to be determined by agreement between instructor and student.

Competency-Based Instruction (CBI)
Definition: Objectives, materials, procedures, and methods of evaluation are specified at the beginning of the course. The requirements are satisfied at the student's own pace, subject to arrangements with the course supervisor and to the university's time-period requirements. This format, as distinguished from Independent Study, will ordinarily be used in established courses. Courses by correspondence and some online courses are generally included in this format. Instructional materials and procedures developed by instructor. Frequency and nature of student-faculty contact determined at the beginning of the course.

Master's Thesis Research
Definition: Highly individualized, investigative study, usually continuing over more than one semester. Subject of research agreed to by student and research supervisor (instructor), in consultation, when required, with guidance committee. Grade deferred until completion of master's program. Exclusively 899 course number. Advance planning occurs between research supervisor (instructor) and student, with goals and scope of project prearranged; minimum contact hours per semester determined by agreement between supervisor and student.

Doctoral Dissertation Research
Definition: Highly individualized, investigative study, usually continuing over several semesters. Subject of research agreed to by student and research supervisor (instructor), in consultation with student's guidance committee. Grade deferred until completion of doctoral program. Exclusively 999 course number. Advance planning occurs between research supervisor (instructor) and student, in consultation with guidance committee.


Online Learning

The university offers selected degree programs, certificate programs, minors, and individual courses online. All university regulations, policies, and procedures described in this catalog that apply to on-campus programs also apply to online programs, unless specified otherwise. For more information about online learning, visit https://reg.msu.edu/ucc/onlineprograms.aspx.

Michigan State University courses offered online are considered on-campus courses. Applicability of specific online Michigan State University courses is determined by the requirements of specific programs. For more information about course formats and credits, visit the Course Formats and Credits section of this catalog.


Distance Education - In-Person, Online and Hybrid Programs

Distance education includes in-person, online, and hybrid instructional delivery.

For in-person programs, participants meet for instruction at an off-campus site.

For an online program, instruction is offered totally online. Texts, reading lists, proctored examinations and/or other non-instructional experiences may be required as stipulated.

For a hybrid program, online instruction is blended with required or scheduled in-person contact, including examinations, laboratories, etc. At least 50% or more of the courses required for the degree or certificate are delivered through online instruction. Texts, reading lists, in-person orientations, proctored examinations and/or other non-instructional experiences may be required as stipulated.

Online and hybrid programs are classified as on-campus programs.


State Authorization

The U.S. Department of Education requires an institution offering distance education programs to acquire authorization from the states in which it operates. In Fall 2015, Michigan State University began participating in the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA), which is an agreement among states that establishes national standards for the interstate offering of postsecondary distance education courses and programs. Through SARA, Michigan State University may provide distance education to residents of any other SARA member state without seeking authorization from each SARA member state individually. For a comprehensive list of SARA states and institutions, see http://nc-sara.org/sara-states-institutions.

For program exceptions and a state-by-state summary showing the most recent state authorization information, please visit:  https://esp.msu.edu/StateSummary.pdf

For additional information, please visit www.reg.msu.edu/AcademicPrograms/Print.aspx?Section=11192 and https://reg.msu.edu/ROInfo/StateAuthInfo.aspx.

Academic Program Terminology

The terminology below is used to describe majors, specializations, teaching minors, and sub-categories within them as noted.

For detailed information on academic program terminology, visit www.reg.msu.edu/Read/UCC/terminology.pdf

Area of Emphasis

A set of disciplinary or interdisciplinary courses exclusively for teacher certification programs. Final approval is integral to the degree certification process.

Cognate

A set of related disciplinary or interdisciplinary courses. Final approval is integral to the degree certification process.

Concentration

A set of disciplinary or interdisciplinary courses within a major. Final approval is integral to the degree certification process.

Graduate Certificate
 

Constructed in selected fields as complements to degree programs or as distinct offerings. Issuance of a graduate certificate signifies completion of course work, specified professional training, skills, or competency levels.
Type 1 - Directly related to a degree program as part of the degree program's requirements. Final approval is integral to the degree certification process.
Type 2 - Distinct entity not related to a degree program. Final approval may be separate from or concurrent with the degree certification process.
Type 3 - Distinct entity not related to a degree program. Final approval is granted by the academic unit.
Type 4 - Distinct entity at the University level not related to a degree program. Final approval is recommended by the administering unit and The Graduate School and is separate from the degree certification process.

Major

A primary field of study named as a specific degree program. Final approval is integral to the degree certification process.

Minor

A secondary field of study at the undergraduate level. Final approval is concurrent with the degree certification process.

Graduate Specialization

An interdisciplinary program of thematically related courses. Final approval is concurrent with the degree certification process.

Teaching Minor

A group of single subject or group subject courses required by the State of Michigan exclusively for teacher certification programs.  Final approval is separate from the degree certification process.


U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Certification

Michigan State University provides information about students receiving educational assistance benefits to the Department of Veterans Affairs, in accordance with federal regulations and university policy. Only credits in courses that are in accordance with Department of Veterans Affairs regulations will be certified. Students receiving Department of Veterans Affairs educational assistance benefits are held to the same standards of academic progress and social conduct as all other students.  

Veterans’ education benefits are based upon the actual start and end date for each course and may vary throughout the semester. In order to receive benefits as a full-time student under programs administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs, students must carry the following minimum credits in standard (15 to 19 credits) full semester fall or spring courses: undergraduate and graduate-professional students, 12 credits; master’s level students, 9 credits; and doctoral level students, 6 credits. Students must carry the following minimum credits in the summer session (14 weeks): undergraduate and graduate-professional students, 9 credits; master's level students, 7 credits; and doctoral level students, 4 credits.


Class Visitor

A person may be permitted to enroll in credit courses as a visitor on a non-credit basis with appropriate approval. Credit may not be earned in courses taken as a visitor except by re-enrollment for credit in the course, and completion of the course with a satisfactory grade. See the Grading Systems section for additional information.

Students enrolled as visitors are expected to attend classes regularly. Those enrolled who do not attend regularly may be dropped from the class at the request of the instructor.

To be enrolled as a visitor, a student must enroll in the same manner as for credit courses at the university. Students enroll for the course through the enrollment system and then contact the Office of the Registrar to have the visitor code added to the record. Enrollment in a course may not be changed to or from a visitor basis except during the first 1/14th of the term of instruction (the 5th day of classes in the fall and spring semesters). Such credits as the course normally carries are included as part of the total credit load for which fees are assessed.


Continuing Education Unit

The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) was created by a national task force. CEUs are granted by a large number of colleges and universities. The International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) provides compliance guidelines and certification of CEU programs. Michigan State University follows the CEU guidelines developed by IACET in awarding CEUs.

Definition:  One CEU equals 10 contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction. CEUs and academic credits are separate and distinct measures of participation in instructional experiences.

The CEU exists to: 1) establish permanent records for noncredit education experiences, 2) provide a basis for uniform data for institutional program planning, and 3)  provide data for  national analysis and policy development related to continuing professional development.

For information about the criteria for both Michigan State University CEUs and Michigan State Board of Education SCECHs (State Continuing Education Clock Hours), visit the Office of the Registrar at www.reg.msu.edu. You may also contact the Coordinator of Continuing Education Programs at 1-517-432-3987 in room 150 of the Administration Building.


Guest Status at Michigan State University

For information regarding guest status at Michigan State University, see the Lifelong Education Status section in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section.


Lifelong Education Enrollment Status

Lifelong Education enrollment status is designed to provide all non-Michigan State University degree students, with the exception of High School students, access to Michigan State University courses. (High School students should refer to the Opportunities for High Achieving High School Students section of this catalog). It is important to note that Lifelong Education is not a college, a major, or an office on campus. It is an enrollment status and the term Lifelong Education is applied to students who are not pursuing a university degree or an Agricultural or Veterinary Technology certificate.

Students enrolling under the Lifelong Education enrollment status should complete the application available on the web at https://admissions.msu.edu/application/app.asp?AL=L. Select either "First-time Users" or "Returning Users."

The Lifelong Education enrollment status permits and facilitates access to Michigan State University courses and workshops (on-campus, off-campus, online, and Study Abroad) for those not wishing to pursue an undergraduate or graduate Michigan State University degree. This status is limited to those who have attained a high school diploma or its equivalent.

Students who have obtained a baccalaureate degree will enroll under the Graduate Lifelong Education enrollment status. All others will be enrolled under the Undergraduate Lifelong Education enrollment status.

A person who has been denied admission to an undergraduate degree program at Michigan State University may not enroll under the Lifelong Education enrollment status until at least two years have elapsed from the date of the denial.

Students pursuing Michigan State University degree programs, students pursuing programs in the Institute of Agricultural Technology or English Language Center, students pursuing the Veterinary Technology certificate program, and students who have been recessed or dismissed from Michigan State University or any other college or university are not eligible for enrollment under the Lifelong Education enrollment status.

Rules of Application, Enrollment, and Fees:
(These rules do not apply to High School students. All High School students should refer to the Opportunity for High Achieving High School Students section of this catalog.)

  1. Students wishing to enroll under the Undergraduate Lifelong Education enrollment status must have a high school diploma or its equivalent.  This information is collected as part of the application procedure.  The high school transcript is not normally required as proof.
    Students with a baccalaureate degree will enroll under the Graduate Lifelong Education enrollment status. This information is collected as part of the application procedure. The degree granting transcript is not required as proof.
    Students enrolled under the Lifelong Education enrollment status who wish to be admitted as undergraduate or graduate degree candidates must make regular application for their desired degree programs with the Office of Admissions. They must do so in accordance with established application deadlines for the given semester.
  2. All students enrolled under the Lifelong Education enrollment status are assessed fees at the Lifelong Education rates. These rates are set at a per credit amount. There are no additional fees associated with this status (i.e., no late enrollment fees, student taxes, etc.). There are surcharges on some online courses.
  3. Prerequisites, grading standards, class assignments, and attendance requirements of a course apply to all students in that course including those enrolled under the Lifelong Education enrollment status.
  4. Colleges, departments, and schools determine rules of access to courses for which they are responsible, and may limit enrollment of students enrolling under the Lifelong Education enrollment status.
  5. The Office of the Registrar will monitor students’ academic progress each semester to ensure that once nine or more credits have been attempted, acceptable progress has been maintained.
    1. An undergraduate student enrolled under the Lifelong Education enrollment status and who has attempted nine or more credits and has not maintained a 2.0 GPA, will be issued a letter stating they are no longer eligible to take courses at Michigan State University. An Academic Advising hold is placed on the student's record.
    2. A graduate student who has attempted nine or more credits and has not maintained a 3.0 GPA, will be issued a letter stating they are no longer eligible to take courses at Michigan State University. An Academic hold is placed on the student's record.
  6. Students enrolled under the Lifelong Education enrollment status are not eligible for most sources of financial assistance including federal financial assistance programs, graduate assistantships, and most fellowships.
  7. Students who have completed course work while enrolled under the Lifelong Education enrollment status and who contemplate subsequent admission to degree programs must seek advice from the admitting department or school and college as to the applicability of courses/credits taken while under the Lifelong Education enrollment status. There is no guarantee that these credits will be acceptable. Applicability is subject to the following general limits.
    1. No more than 16 credits taken while enrolled under the Lifelong Education enrollment status may be applied to the undergraduate degree program.
    2. No more than 9 credits taken while enrolled under the Lifelong Education enrollment status may be applied to the graduate degree program. Refer to the Graduate Education section of the catalog for the aggregate limit.
    3. Courses taken under the Lifelong Education enrollment status may not be transferred to Human, Osteopathic, or Veterinary Medical Programs but may be used to waive program requirements at the discretion of the college.


Education Abroad

For information regarding education abroad, see Education Abroad in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog.


Code of Teaching Responsibility

Satisfaction of teaching responsibilities by instructional staff members (herein referred to as instructors) is essential to the successful functioning of a university. This University conceives these responsibilities to be so important that performance by instructors in meeting the provisions of this Code shall be taken into consideration in determining salary increases, tenure, and promotion.

  1. Course content:  Instructors shall be responsible for ensuring that the content of the courses they teach is consistent with the course descriptions approved by the University Committee on Curriculum and the University Council. Instructors shall direct class activities toward the fulfillment of course objectives and shall evaluate student performance in a manner consistent with these objectives.
  2. Course syllabi:  Instructors shall be responsible for distributing a course syllabus (either in print or electronic form) at the beginning of the semester. The syllabus shall minimally include:
    (a)    instructional objectives;
    (b)    instructor contact information and office hours;
    (c)    grading criteria and methods used to determine final course grades;
    (d)    date of the final examination and tentative dates of required assignments, quizzes, and tests, if applicable;
    (e)    attendance policy, if different from the University attendance policy and especially when that attendance policy affects student grades;
    (f)     required and recommended course materials to be purchased, including textbooks and supplies; and
    (g)   any required proctoring arrangements to which students must adhere. 
  3. Student Assessment and Final Grades:  Instructors shall be responsible for informing students, in a timely manner so as to enhance learning, of the grading criteria and methods used to determine grades on individual assignments.  Instructors shall be responsible for assessing a student’s performance based on announced criteria and on standards of academic achievement. Instructors shall submit final course grades in accordance with University deadlines. Assessment methods should be appropriate to the learning objectives of the course. In that context, instructors are expected to take reasonable steps to create an assessment environment that promotes academic integrity. When proctoring or other security measures are necessary to ensure integrity of assessments, then such measures should be administered in a manner consistent with the design and delivery of the course.
  4. Testing Documents:  Instructors shall be responsible for returning to student's answers to quizzes, tests, and examinations with such promptness to enhance the learning experience.  Instructors shall retain final examination answers for at least one semester to allow students to review or to retrieve them.  All testing questions (whether on quizzes, tests, or mid-semester or final examinations) are an integral part of course materials, and the decision whether to allow students to retain them is left to the discretion of the instructor.
  5. Term Papers and Comparable Projects:  Instructors shall be responsible for returning to student's term papers and other comparable projects with sufficient promptness to enhance the learning experience.  Term papers and other comparable projects are the property of students who prepare them.  Instructors shall retain such unclaimed course work for at least one semester to allow students to retrieve such work.  Instructors have a right to retain a copy of student course work for their own files.
  6. Class Meetings:  Instructors shall be responsible for meeting their classes regularly and at scheduled times.  To allow units to take appropriate action, instructors shall notify their units if they are to be absent and have not made suitable arrangements regarding their classes.
  7. Applicability of  the Code of Teaching Responsibility to Student Assistants:  Instructors of courses in which assistants are authorized to perform teaching, grading, or other instructional functions shall be responsible for acquainting such individuals with the provisions of this Code and for monitoring their compliance.
  8. Instructor Accessibility to Students:  Instructors shall be responsible for being accessible to students outside of class time and therefore shall schedule and keep office hours for student conferences.  Office hours should be scheduled at times convenient to both students and instructors with the additional option of mutually convenient prearranged appointments for students whose schedules conflict with announced office hours.  Each teaching unit shall determine the minimum number of office hours for instructors in that unit.  Instructors who serve as academic advisors also shall be responsible for maintaining appropriate office hours before and during enrollment periods.  In addition to office hours, instructor accessibility through e-mail and other means is encouraged.
  9. Commercialization of Course Notes and Materials:  The University prohibits students from commercializing their notes of lectures and University-provided class materials without the written consent of the instructor.  Instructors may allow commercialization by including permission in the course syllabus or other written statement distributed to all students in the class.

Hearing Procedures

  1. Students may register complaints regarding an instructor's failure to comply with the provisions of the Code of Teaching Responsibility directly with that instructor.
  2. Students may also take complaints directly to teaching units' chief administrators or their designates. If those persons are unable to resolve matters to the student's satisfaction, undergraduate students may request a formal grievance hearing before the University Academic Grievance Hearing Board (see SRR Article 7. III). Unsatisfied graduate students may request a formal grievance hearing before their department hearing board (see GSRR Article 5). Before doing this, all students are encouraged to meet with the University Ombudsperson.
  3. Such complaints must normally be initiated no later than the middle of the semester following the one wherein alleged violations occurred. Exceptions shall be made in cases where the involved instructor or student is absent from the University during the semester following the one wherein alleged violations occurred.

Student Instructional Rating System (SIRS)

Preamble

The principal objective of the student instructional rating policy is to secure information which is indispensable to implementation of the University's policy of providing its students with instruction of the highest quality. This information is put to two principal uses:  (1) providing instructors and teaching units with an accurate account of student response to their instructional practices, to the end that classroom effectiveness be maintained at the highest level of excellence; and (2) providing teaching units with one kind of information to be considered in deciding on retention, promotion, salary, and tenure, to the end that effectiveness in instruction constitutes an important criterion in evaluating the service to the University of members of the teaching faculty. In order to accomplish these objectives more fully, the following procedures were established.

  1. Every teaching unit shall approve one or more common student rating instruments through its own channels of participation, in accordance with unit bylaws and customs of collegial decision making. Regardless of the type of instrument adopted, it must prominently display the following notation:
    The Michigan State University CODE OF TEACHING RESPONSIBILITY holds all instructors to certain obligations with respect to, e.g., course content consistent with approved descriptions, timely statement of course objectives and grading criteria, regular class attendance, published office hours, and timely return of examinations and semester papers. This Code is printed in full in the Academic Programs catalog or is available online at https://www.reg.msu.edu/AcademicPrograms/Text.aspx?Section=112#s514. It includes specifics about complaint procedures available to students who believe that their instructors have violated the Code.
  2. Each teaching unit shall make regular and systematic use of student instructional ratings as part of the unit's evaluation of instructional performance. Each teaching unit shall formulate and promulgate a comprehensive policy covering all aspects of student instructional rating procedures, and shall be responsible for implementing that policy within the framework of the provisions contained in this document. Students shall not be required or requested by faculty members to identify themselves on the rating forms.
  3. All instructors, regardless of rank, including graduate assistants, shall use unit-approved student instructional rating forms in all classes (every course, every section, every semester). For team-teaching situations, units shall develop procedures consistent with the intent of these provisions.
  4. Individual instructors may use other instruments to gather additional information.
  5. Results of student instructional ratings shall be used in accordance with the following provisions:
    1. Results shall be returned promptly to the instructor for information and assistance in improving course design and instruction.
    2. Instructors shall have the opportunity to comment, orally and/or in writing, upon the ratings received. These comments shall be taken into account by persons or groups charged with making or advising on personnel decisions.
    3. Results of student instructional ratings shall be systematically consulted, with due regard for strict confidentiality, in conjunction with other means for assessing individual effectiveness, according to the review criteria promulgated within each unit. Other means might include, e.g., classroom visits or consideration of course syllabi, assignments, and examinations.
  6. Procedures for implementing the rating process and for utilizing the results shall be promulgated by each teaching unit, subject to the following provisions:
    1. Duly promulgated unit procedures shall be filed in the offices of the appropriate Dean and the Provost, where they will be matters of public record.
    2. Unit administrators are responsible for implementing in their units SIRS procedures which follow fully the requirements of this document.
    3. Teaching units may have the required SIRS instruments administered by a person other than the instructor. If the unit does not administer the instruments, instructors are obligated to do so, and to return all results to unit offices within the time period specified in the unit procedures.
    4. At the time instruments are administered, students shall be informed who will have access to the results and how the results will be used.


Student Opinion of Courses and Teaching (SOCT)

Preamble

The following policy operates as a complement to the Student Instructional Rating System (SIRS) policy to provide selected public information for students as an aid to choosing courses.

Policy on the Student Public Evaluation System

Students at Michigan State University have an interest in being able to make informed judgments in selecting courses and faculty members as students pursue their academic programs. To this end, the University Committee on Undergraduate Education has framed a set of questions that should provide the type of information that students seek. In order to facilitate the transmission of this information to the students, the following procedures are established:

  1. In addition to using standard university or unit-based SIRS forms in every class each semester in compliance with the Student Instructional Rating System policy, faculty members at the rank of instructor or above, and specialists who are assigned to teach, shall administer a standard form (Student Opinion of Courses and Teaching) in all of their regular undergraduate classes.
  2. The SOCT forms shall be administered within the last two weeks of classes. Instructors should leave the room until the forms have been completed and collected. The forms should be collected by a neutral party, turned in to a predetermined location, and should not be accessible to the instructor until grades are submitted. 
  3. Results will be disseminated in summary form, displayed by instructor and department, once per year through a Web site, https://soct.msu.edu, accessible to students and other members of the University community with the appropriate identification. A maximum of two recent semesters taught by that instructor over a maximum of two years with a minimum of five student responses will be displayed.

Credit by Examination

The credit-by-examination option is available to qualified students. Examination may take the form of course or laboratory projects, written or oral reports, evidence of satisfactory skill performance, etc. Enrollment is subject to the provisions detailed below.

Some courses are especially designated for credit by examination in the Schedule of Courses (sections numbered 999). Students who wish to avail themselves of this option must do so through the regular enrollment procedure.

The credit-by-examination option may also be made available in courses not so designated in the Schedule of Courses. Instructors will consider requests from interested students, and may recommend to the unit administrator the offering of an ad hoc credit-by-examination section to accommodate the needs of particular students. Following approval by the unit administrator, regular enrollment procedures apply.

Provisions

  1. The credit-by-examination system is designed to serve students who have the capability and discipline for independent learning. Students who are in academic difficulty should not use it.
  2. Enrollment must be by approval of the department or school. Before approval is given, department and school offices and/or designated instructors will provide the student with a written statement of the materials and skills to be mastered, and the manner in which proficiency is to be demonstrated.
  3. The credit-by-examination procedure is not intended, and should not be construed, as a tutorial system, or as a system comparable to regular class enrollment: students must not expect tutorial assistance from professors, and professors must not expect students to attend class.
  4. Units should exclude from this option those courses in which class attendance and participation are an integral part of the instruction.
  5. Academic standards shall be comparable to those applying to regular courses.
    5.1    A failing grade should be reported to the Registrar in cases of failure to appear for the examination, or failure to demonstrate stipulated minimum proficiency. The I-incomplete or DF-deferred or ET-extension symbol for the postponement of a grade may be used in extraordinary circumstances, providing appropriate documentation is placed in the record by the instructor and approved by the assistant or associate dean.
    5.2    Credit-by-examination may not be employed as a means of repeating a course in which a low or failing grade was received, either through regular enrollment or by examination.
  6. Implementation of the policy is the responsibility of unit administrators, Deans, and the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education and Dean of Undergraduate Studies.


Definitions of Terms Related to Calculations of Credits and Grade-Point Averages

Credits Passed

Total Michigan State University credits passed on the numerical system, the Credit-No Credit (CR-NC) system, the Pass-No Grade (P-N) system, and by examination plus all credits accepted in transfer from other institutions. For a course that was repeated, only the credits associated with the last enrollment are counted in the total number of credits passed.

Credits Repeated

Total credits repeated at Michigan State University and all Michigan State University credits repeated at and accepted in transfer from other institutions.

Credits Attempted

Total Michigan State University credits for which a grade was recorded or for which the W (no grade) symbol was recorded. Credits accepted in transfer from other institutions are included in the total number of Michigan State University credits attempted. Credits in courses taken on the CR-NC system count as credits attempted irrespective of whether the outcome is CR or NC. Similarly included are all credits in courses taken on the P-N system. Credits in courses for which a V symbol was recorded are not included in credits attempted.

Grade-Point Credits

Total number of credits in all Michigan State University courses for which a numerical grade was recorded.  Credits for courses repeated on the numerical system count only for the last grade recorded.

Grade-Point System

The grade-point system and the  numerical grading scale are identical. Grade points for each course are determined by multiplying the numerical grade by the number of credits for the course.

Grade-Point Average

A measure of the student's  academic performance in Michigan State University courses for which the student received a numerical grade.

Semester

To compute the grade-point average for a semester, divide the total grade points for the semester by the total grade-point credits for the semester.

Cumulative

To compute the cumulative grade-point average, divide the total grade points for all semesters by the total grade-point credits for all semesters.

A cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 is required for graduation from the university for bachelor's degrees.  A cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 is required for graduate degrees.

For information on Grading Systems and Repeating a Course, refer to those statements.


Independent Study

Definition

At Michigan State University, Independent Study is planned study, highly individualized, not addressable through any other course format, proposed in writing by the student on a standard form, accepted for supervision by a faculty member, and approved by the student's academic advisor and the teaching unit at the beginning of the semester.

Guidelines

Independent Study should:

  1. Consist of work not described in the university catalog in any other format;
  2. Be taken under a course number commensurate with the student's class level, major field, and experience;
  3. Relate to a subject for which the student has adequate preparation;
  4. Be directed by a faculty member with whom there is periodic contact and consultation throughout the study;
  5. Not exceed 8 semester hours of credit in a single semester or summer session;
  6. Not exceed 10 percent of the credits earned in a bachelor's program;
  7. Be applied for on the form provided by the department or school or college;
  8. Be approved on this form before the student enrolls for the course; registration should be completed by the end of the period for adding courses.



Grading Systems

Michigan State University employs three systems of grading: a numerical system, a supplemental credit-no credit system, and a limited pass-no grade system.

All grades are final and may not be changed by re-examination or by the submission of additional work. See Repeating a Course.


The Numerical System

The numerical system consists of the following scale. 4.0 - 3.5 - 3.0 - 2.5 - 2.0 - 1.5 - 1.0 - 0.0.

Grading Procedure of the Numerical System:

  1. Credit is awarded at the following minimum levels:
    1.0 for undergraduate students.
    2.0 for graduate students.
    However, all grades are counted in the calculation of the grade-point average (GPA).
  2. The minimum cumulative grade-point average required for graduation is a 2.0 for undergraduates and 3.0 for graduate students.
  3. In particular graduate programs the number of 2.0 grades acceptable for credit may be expressly restricted and/or levels higher than the 2.0 minimum may be established for the fulfillment of degree requirements.
  4. Grades given in courses completed under enrollment on the numerical system cannot be converted to credit or no-credit under the credit-no credit system.

Since the novel coronavirus pandemic required significant changes to instruction, S-Satisfactory and NS-Not Satisfactory grades were made available to undergraduate and graduate students for Spring 2020, Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 classes. Summer 2021 S/NS grades were available for undergraduate students only.

S-Satisfactory – Credit granted represents a level of performance equivalent to 1.0 and higher for undergraduate students and 2.0 and higher for graduate students. NS-Not Satisfactory – No credit granted represents a level of performance below 1.0 for undergraduate students and below 2.0 for graduate students except for the College of Veterinary Medicine Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) students where NS represents performance below 1.0.
 


The Credit-No Credit System

The credit-no credit system is intended to allow students to study in areas outside the major field of study without jeopardizing their grade-point averages. In the credit-no credit system the following symbols are used.

CR-Credit—means that credit is granted and represents a level of performance equivalent to or above the grade-point average required for graduation. Thus, undergraduate students must perform at or above the 2.0 level before credit is granted; graduate students must perform at or above the 3.0 level.

NC-No Credit—means that no credit is granted and represents a level of performance below the grade-point average required for graduation, i.e., below 2.0 for undergraduate students, below 3.0 for graduate students.

Grading Procedure of the CR-NC System

  1. Grades on the CR-NC system are not included in computing the semester or cumulative grade-point average.
  2. Enrollment on a CR-NC basis is recorded with the academic advisor and with the Registrar. The instructor's class list does not indicate which students are enrolled on CR-NC basis.
  3. When the course is completed, all students are graded on the numerical system.
  4. The Registrar then converts the numerical grades to credit or no credit in accord with the definitions of CR-NC stated above, but retains the numerical grades in the student's academic records.
  5. When a student changes a major preference or a major, the Registrar will convert those letter grades to numerical grades in courses that are necessarily graded on the numerical system in the new major upon request by the student's college.

Enrollment in the CR-NC System
Enrollment on a CR-NC basis is open to students, at their option, subject to the following conditions:

  1. Course prerequisites and other criteria for enrolling in any course shall be determined by the department or college offering the course and apply equally to both the numerical and the CR-NC systems.
  2. The choice of numerical or CR-NC system does not affect admission to the course.
  3. All courses in every department and college are available on a CR-NC basis unless these courses are:
    1. Used to satisfy the Tier I writing requirement, the Tier II writing requirement, the university mathematics requirement, and Integrative Studies Program requirements, or
    2. Designated as Type 1, Type 2, or Type 3 courses under the remedial-developmental-preparatory course policy.
    3. Specifically excluded from CR-NC enrollment by the department, school, or college of the student's major preference or major, or the unit recommending the student for certification.
  4. Limitations:
    1. No undergraduate student may enroll in more than a total of 20 credits on the CR-NC system.
    2. The limitations on the number of credits a graduate student may take in a given semester on the CR-NC basis, and the total number of credits that may be taken in a given degree program on a CR-NC basis, shall be established by the college, department, or school, or the unit recommending the student for certification in which the student is a major.
  5. Each department, school, or college, or the unit recommending the student for certification shall designate those courses that its majors or candidates for certification may not take on the CR-NC system.
  6. Choice of the CR-NC system must be communicated by the student to the Office of the Registrar by the middle of the semester date in the fall and spring semesters and may not be changed after that date.
  7. Any course taken more than once must be repeated on the same grading system under which the course was completed the first time, except where standard requirements to the contrary must be satisfied in order to meet graduation requirements.


The Pass-No Grade System

This system is used only in courses specifically approved by the University Committee on Curriculum. Non-credit courses and those involving field experience are the usual types of courses approved for P-N grading. Courses approved for P-N grading are so marked in the Schedule of Courses on the web.

In the pass-no grade system the following symbols are used:

    P-Pass—means that credit is granted and that the student achieved a level of performance judged to be satisfactory by the instructor.

    N-No Grade—means that no credit is granted and that the student did not achieve a level of performance judged to be satisfactory by the instructor.


Grade Markers


Conditional Pass Marker

The Conditional Pass (CP) marker is used only for graduate-professional students in the College of Human Medicine and the College of Veterinary Medicine when all of the following criteria are met:

  1. The student is enrolled in a 500- or 600-level course that is administered by the College of Human Medicine or the College of Veterinary Medicine. The University Committee on Curriculum approved the use of the Pass-No Grade (P-N) grading system for College of Human Medicine students who are enrolled in 500- and 600-level courses in this college.
  2. The student has either:
    1. met almost all of the course objectives (criteria for passing), but is deficient in a specific, definable course segment; or
    2. completed all of the course requirements but failed to meet the overall pass level by a narrow margin (e.g., received a 68 percent overall score where 70 percent is the pass level).
  3. The course instructor believes that the student's overall performance has been such that the student should not be required to repeat the entire course and that the character of the deficiency is specific and identifiable and is likely to be remediable within a foreseeable time span and through specifiable action by the student.

The required work must be completed and a grade (P or N or numeric) must be reported to the Office of the Registrar no later than the middle of the student's next semester in attendance, if that semester is within one calendar year following the receipt of the CP. An exception may be made if an instructor submits an administrative action form stating that the course structure necessitates delay of remediation grading until the end of the student's next semester in attendance (excluding summer session).

When the specified remediation activity is completed or the time allowed for remediation has expired, the grade of P or N or numeric is assigned. The completion of the remediation activity within the time allowed results in a grade of P or 1.0, and failure to complete the specified remediation activity by the due date results in a grade of N or 0.0.


Visitor

The V-Visitor—is recorded on the transcript in credit courses for students enrolled as a visitor on a non-credit basis. Choice of the V-Visitor must be communicated by the student to the Office of the Registrar during the first 1/14th of the term of instruction (the 5th day of classes in the fall and spring semesters) and may not be changed after that date.

 


Postponement of Grading

When special or unusual circumstances occur, the instructor may postpone assignment of the student's final grade in a course by use of an I-Incomplete, a DF-Deferred, or an ET-Extension marker.

 


I-Incomplete

The I-Incomplete may be given only when: the student (a) has completed at least 6/7 of the term of instruction, but is unable to complete the class work and/or take the final examination because of illness or other compelling reason; and (b) has done satisfactory work in the course; and (c) in the instructor's judgment can complete the required work without repeating the course.

Provided these conditions are met, the instructor electing to give an I-Incomplete files an Agreement for Completion of (I) Incomplete at the time course grades are due. This agreement specifies what the student must do, and when. The department or school office gives a copy to the student, and retains a copy for at least one year.

The required work must be completed, and a grade must be reported to the Office of the Registrar, no later than the middle of the student's next semester in attendance (summer session excluded) if that semester is within one calendar year following receipt of the I-Incomplete. Exception to this deadline:  An instructor may submit an Administrative Action stating that course structure necessitates delay of make-up grading until the end of the student's next semester in attendance. The I-Incomplete, in addition to the grade reported, will remain on the student’s academic record.

Failure to complete the required work by the due date will result in a grade of 0.0, NC or N, depending on the grading system under which the student was enrolled. (A student who does not register for Michigan State University courses subsequent to receipt of an I-Incomplete has one calendar year to complete the required work; after that, the I-Incomplete will become U-Unfinished and will be changed to U on the student's academic record, and the course may be completed only by re-enrollment).

An extension of time for completion of the required work may be approved by the college offering the course only by means of an Administrative Action documenting physician-certified illness or other extraordinary circumstances.

An Extension of Time is a formal agreement between the instructor and the student. After an Extension of Time has been filed, the work must be done by the deadline determined by the instructor or the I-Incomplete will be changed to 0.0, NC, or N depending on the grading system under which the student was enrolled.


DF-Deferred

The DF-Deferred applies to the numerical, the CR-NC, and P-N grading systems.

Given only to graduate students who are doing satisfactory work but cannot complete the course work because of reasons acceptable to the instructor.

The required work must be completed and a grade reported within six months (190 calendar days from the last class day of the term of instruction), with the option of a single six-month extension (190 calendar days). If the required work is not completed within the time limit, the DF-Deferred will become U-Unfinished and will be changed to U. This rule does not apply to graduate thesis or dissertation work.


ET-Extension

The ET-Extension applies to the numerical, the CR-NC, and P-N systems.

Given to undergraduate, graduate, and graduate-professional students only in courses specifically approved by the University Committee on Curriculum. Approval requires specification of the time period within which work must be completed. Courses that involve field experience or thesis work and courses in which work normally extends beyond one semester are the types of courses normally considered.

A final grade must be reported upon completion of the final course in the sequence or in the time approved for the completion of the work. If a final grade is not reported in these periods, the ET will be changed to 0.0, NC or N, depending on the grading system under which the student was enrolled.


Repeating a Course

Undergraduate students can repeat a course no matter the previous grade. Undergraduate students who enrolled in a course for CR, or P cannot repeat the course on a credit basis. Students may repeat a course for a maximum of two times for three total enrollments and can repeat a maximum of 20 credits.

A  graduate student who received a grade of 2.0 or above, CR, or P in a course may not repeat the course on a credit basis with the following exception: with the approval of the associate dean, a graduate student may repeat a course in which a grade of 2.0 or 2.5 was received.  The number of credits that a graduate student may repeat is determined by the student's academic advisor or guidance committee, in accordance with unit policies.

Whenever a course is repeated on a credit basis, the last grade and credits earned completely replace the previous grade in the satisfaction of requirements and computation of the cumulative grade-point average. All entries remain a part of the student's permanent academic record. 

Any course repeated for credit must be taken on the same grading system under which the course was taken the first time, except where standard requirements to the contrary must be satisfied in order to meet graduation requirements.

Credit by Examination may not be used to repeat a course in which a grade below 2.0 was received.

A student who has taken a course as a visitor may subsequently enroll in the course for credit with the approval of his or her advisor.

Financial Aid and Repeats

Federal financial aid regulations limit the number of times a student may repeat a course and receive financial aid for that course.  The following guidelines apply to students eligible for federal aid.

  1. A student may receive aid when repeating a course that was previously failed (received a 0.0 or No Pass) multiple times.
  2. Once a student passes a class, they can only receive aid for retaking that course one additional time, regardless of the grade earned for that additional attempt. Any subsequent attempts will not be eligible for aid.
  3. If a student retakes a course that is not aid eligible, a recalculation of aid is done to exclude the credits for the repeated course.  Students are notified by the Office of Financial Aid if their aid needs to be reduced.
  4. A course that is dropped is not considered an attempt for purposes of this policy.


Correction of Grades

Once recorded in the Office of the Registrar, a student's grade may not be changed unless the first grade was in error.  An Administrative Action must be submitted certifying the reasons why the first grade is in error. The request must be approved by the instructor, the chairperson of the department or school offering the course, the associate dean of the college in which the course is offered, and the student's associate dean. The time limit for the correction of grades is 30 days after the start of the subsequent semester or summer session.

The Office of the Registrar reserves the right to audit student records and to correct them as necessary.

 


Integrity of Scholarship and Grades

(Note: This policy is not applicable to students in the MSU College of Law degree programs.  The Law College follows American Bar Association requirements and the Law Students Rights and Responsibilities document. http://splife.studentlife.msu.edu/law-students-rights-and-responsibilities

The following statement of university policy addresses principles and procedures to be used in instances of academic dishonesty, violations of professional standards, and falsification of academic or admission records, herein after referred to as academic misconduct. [See General Student Regulation 1.00, Protection of Scholarship and Grades.]

  1. The principles of truth and honesty are recognized as fundamental to a community of scholars. The university expects both instructors and students to honor these principles and, in so doing, to protect the validity of university education and grades. Practices that maintain the integrity of scholarship and grades include providing accurate information for academic and admission records, adherence to unit-approved professional standards and honor codes, and completion of original academic work by the student to whom it is assigned, without unauthorized aid of any kind. To encourage adherence to the principles of truth and honesty, instructors should exercise care in planning and supervising academic work, and implement proctoring standards appropriate to the design of the course.

  2. If an instructor alleges a student has committed an act of academic misconduct, the instructor is responsible for taking appropriate action. Depending on the instructor’s judgment of a specific instance, the instructor may give the student a penalty grade. A penalty grade may be a reduced score or grade for the assignment or a reduced grade for the course. [For a definition of “penalty grade”, see Student Rights and Responsibilities (SRR) 11 and Graduate Students Rights and Responsibilities (GSRR) 8.1.18.]

  3. When an instructor gives an undergraduate or graduate student a penalty grade for academic misconduct, the instructor must complete and submit an Academic Dishonesty Report (available on the Registrar’s Form Menu under Instructor Systems). The report will be sent to the student, the student’s dean, the Dean of the Graduate School (for graduate students) or Dean of Students (for undergraduate students) and be added to the student’s academic record provisionally.  It will remain in the student’s record unless: a) the student successfully grieves the allegation; b) the instructor filing the report requests it be removed; or, for undergraduates only, c) upon conferral of their degree if only one report has been filed, the student has successfully completed the required course on academic integrity, and no additional sanctions were requested.

  4. When completing the Academic Dishonesty Report, if the instructor gives a failing grade in the course, the instructor may request the student’s academic dean to impose sanctions in addition to the failing grade.

  5. When in the judgment of the student’s academic dean, a sanction in addition to a penalty grade is warranted (e.g., dismissal from a unit or program), the dean may call for an academic disciplinary hearing. In calling for an academic disciplinary hearing, the student’s academic dean may act independently or in response to a request by the instructor. [See SRR 7.V., GSRR 5.5., and Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities (MSRR) 5.3.]

  6. A student accused of academic misconduct may request an academic grievance hearing to contest the allegation before the appropriate hearing board. In cases involving academic misconduct, no student may be dismissed from a course or program of study without an academic disciplinary hearing.

  7. On the first offense of academic misconduct, the student must complete an educational program on academic integrity and academic misconduct provided by the Dean of Students for undergraduate students or the Dean of the Graduate School for graduate students.

  8. In cases involving undergraduate students in which the student’s academic dean, or designee, calls for an academic disciplinary hearing, the student’s academic dean will refer the case to the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students will notify the student in writing of the call for a disciplinary hearing and will invite the student to a meeting to determine the appropriate judiciary for the hearing. [See SRR 7.V.]

  9. In cases involving graduate students in which the student’s academic dean, or designee, calls for an academic disciplinary hearing, the student’s academic dean will inform the student and then refer the case to the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School will notify the student in writing of the call for a disciplinary hearing and will invite the student to a meeting to discuss the hearing process. [See GSRR 5.5.]

  10. Either party may appeal a decision of an administrative disciplinary hearing or a disciplinary hearing board to the appropriate appellate board. [See SRR 7.VII., GSRR 5.4.12., and MSRR 5.8.]


Protection of Scholarship and Grades General Student Regulations, 1.00

The principles of truth and honesty are fundamental to the educational process and the academic integrity of the University; therefore, no student shall:

               
1.01 claim or submit the academic work of another as one's own.
1.02 procure, provide, accept or use any materials containing questions or answers to any examination or assignment without proper authorization.
1.03 complete or attempt to complete any assignment or examination for another individual without proper authorization.
1.04 allow any examination or assignment to be completed for oneself, in part or in total, by another without proper authorization.
1.05 alter, tamper with, appropriate, destroy or otherwise interfere with the research, resources, or other academic work of another person.
1.06 fabricate or falsify data or results.


Ordinance on Examinations MSU Ordinances, 17.00

17.01 Unauthorized attainment of
17.02 Unauthorized transfer of
17.03 Prima facie evidence

.01 No person shall procure in any unauthorized manner any examination question or answer related to any course of study offered at Michigan State University, regardless of the form or format in which such question or answer may originally have been maintained.

.02 No person shall furnish to any unauthorized person any examination question or answer related to any course of study offered at Michigan State University, regardless of the form or format in which such question or answer may originally have been maintained.

.03 The unauthorized possession of any of the aforesaid examination documents shall be considered prima facie evidence of an attempt to violate the provisions of this section.

 


Personal Integrity and Conduct

The university expects student conduct and behavior to reflect qualities of good citizenship. The out-of-classroom activities of Michigan State University students should reflect favorably upon the institution and should indicate the personal integrity of the individual.

See Spartan Life for specific policies, ordinances and regulations that define some of the relevant university expectations.


The Academic Record

A Grade Report of a student's grades earned in each course is available to the student at the end of each semester or summer session at www.stuinfo.msu.edu.

Due to unsatisfactory work, a student may be warned, placed on probation, academically recessed, or academically dismissed from the university.

A permanent record of all the student's courses, credits and grades earned is maintained by the Office of the Registrar, 150 Administration Building. The permanent record reflects all courses taken while enrolled at any academic level at Michigan State University. Records are regularly audited and corrected as necessary. The student should maintain a record of courses, credits and grades each semester or summer session and check from time to time to see that this record agrees with that of the university. The record may also help the student determine eligibility for any activity that requires meeting specific scholastic standards.


Transcripts

A copy of a student's complete permanent record is available to the student upon receipt of a request. The permanent record reflects all courses taken while enrolled at any academic level at Michigan State University.  Transcripts can be requested at https://reg.msu.edu/Transcripts/Transcript.aspx. Requests can also be made in person or by writing to the Office of the Registrar, Hannah Administration Building, 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-2603. The university reserves the right to withhold the transcript in case of delinquent student indebtedness to the university. However, the Student Accounts Office may authorize release of a transcript directly to a prospective employer on an exception basis.


Certified Copy of Diploma

A certified copy of the student's diploma is available to the student. The student must bring the original diploma and the $25 fee for each copy to the Office of the Registrar, Hannah Administration Building, 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-2603. (See Costs in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section of this catalog.)


Honorary Degrees

Michigan State University has been awarding honorary degrees since 1885 to honor distinguished persons for their contributions to their field and to society. Nominees exemplify the values inherent in MSU’s mission. Past recipients include accomplished scientists, humanists, scholars of the arts, members of the professions, and persons in public life or business. Invitations to nominees are issued only by the President.

For more information on the nomination process, visit https://research.msu.edu/honorary-degrees.


Posthumous Degrees

A posthumous degree may be awarded in the name of a deceased student upon the recommendation of the student’s major department and college when the student was in good academic standing and had made substantial progress towards the degree.
 
The chairperson of the department responsible for the administration of the degree program of the deceased student may submit a recommendation to the dean, who, in turn, may submit a recommendation to the registrar for records verification. The registrar will forward to the provost. If the provost endorses, then the recommendation will be sent to the president to be considered for final approval. The transcript bears the notation, “Degree granted posthumously.”

Mark of Achievement

On rare occasions, a deceased student who is ineligible for a posthumous degree may be recognized for his/her academic work by means of receiving a Mark of Achievement certificate.

With the support of the academic unit, a request is initiated by the student’s college dean. Undergraduate and graduate students who are in good academic standing and in the judgment of the college dean may be recommended for a Mark of Achievement. The college dean shall provide a recommendation along with a verification of the student’s academic standing to the Associate Provost for Academic Services for review and recommendation and then to the Provost for approval.  The Provost shall notify the Registrar and the Mark of Achievement shall be mailed or delivered to the academic unit for distribution to the family.


Student Records and the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

Michigan State University complies fully with the letter and spirit of the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy (FERPA) which governs access to, and confidentiality of, student records.

As a means of complying with this act, the university has developed the Michigan State University Access to Student Information. These Guidelines are reproduced below.



Michigan State University Access to Student Information

Introduction
Michigan State University (“the University”) maintains student education records and is responsible for their access to and release in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. § 1232g (“FERPA”). It is the policy of the University to comply with FERPA.
Reason for Guidelines
These guidelines comply with standards established in FERPA. The guidelines govern the procedures for maintenance and access to student education records held by the University. The guidelines have a two-fold purpose:
  1. To protect a student’s right to privacy of information in the University’s possession concerning the student; and 
  2. To provide guidance on release or disclosure of student information required by law and as necessary for the effective functioning of the campus community.
Who Should Read These Guidelines
All students, faculty and staff with access to student education records should read and be familiar with these guidelines.
Notification of Student Rights under FERPA
All currently enrolled students at the University are notified annually of their rights under FERPA. These rights include:
  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records.
  2. The right to request amendment of education records the student believes are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA.
  3. The right to provide written consent before personally identifiable information from the student’s education records is disclosed except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning any alleged violation of the student’s rights under FERPA.
Definitions
The following definitions apply to terms as they are used in these guidelines.
Directory Information
Directory information is information in a student’s education record which may be disclosed to outside parties without a student’s prior written consent. While disclosure of directory information about a student is not generally considered harmful or an invasion of privacy under FERPA, FERPA does not require the University to disclose directory information to outside parties. Information that the University has designated as directory information is listed in the Michigan State University Notification of Student Rights under FERPA available at https://www.reg.msu.edu/read/NotificationandDirectoryInformationNotice.pdf.

Currently enrolled students may restrict the release of directory information by notifying the Office of the Registrar or updating their directory restrictions online through the StuInfo web site at https://stuinfo.msu.edu/.
Education Records
Education records are those records, files, documents, and other materials which contain information directly related to a student and are maintained by the University or by a party acting on behalf of the University. This includes information or data recorded in any medium including, but not limited to, handwriting, print, tapes, film, microfilm, microfiche, and any electronic storage or retrieval media.
Education records exclude: (1) records that are in the sole possession of school officials and are not accessible by other personnel; (2) law enforcement or campus security records that are maintained or created by the law enforcement unit for the purpose of law enforcement; (3) employment records relating to students who are employed by the University, unless the employment is a result of his/her status as a student; (4) records created or maintained by a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist or other recognized professional or paraprofessional, that are used only in connection with the treatment of the student and are not available to anyone other than those providing such treatment; and (5) records that contain information about an individual after that person is no longer a student at the University, unless the records pertain to the individual’s previous attendance as a student.
FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, 20 U.S.C. § 1232g (http://www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html).
Legitimate Educational Interest
An individual has a legitimate educational interest in education records if the information or record is relevant and necessary to the accomplishment of some employment or other institutional task, service, or function.
Parent
A parent is an individual who is the natural parent, the guardian, or the individual acting as the parent in the absence of a parent or guardian, of a student at the University.
Personally Identifiable Information
Personally identifiable information is any information that, alone or in combination, is linked or linkable to a specific student that would allow a reasonable person in the campus community, who does not have personal knowledge of the relevant circumstances, to identify the student with reasonable certainty.  Examples of personally identifiable information include, but are not limited to: (1) the student’s name; (2) name of the student’s parent or other family member; (3) the address of the student or student’s family; (4) a personal identifier, such as a student’s social security number or student number; (5) the student’s date and place of birth; (6) the student’s mother’s maiden name; (7) biometric record; and (8) a list of personal characteristics or other information that would identify the student with reasonable certainty. Personally identifiable information also includes information requested by a person who the University reasonably believes knows the identity of the student to whom the education record relates.
School Official
A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic/research, or support staff position; contractors, consultants, volunteers and other non-employees performing institutional services and functions; and a person serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.
Student
A student is any individual with respect to whom the University maintains education records and has been in attendance at the University. Attendance is defined as physical attendance or participation in an academically-related activity, including but not limited to the submission of an assignment, taking an exam, or participation in a study group or online discussion about academic matters. A student’s education records are protected under these guidelines beginning on the first day of the first term for which they have enrolled. No student shall be required to waive his or her rights under FERPA as a condition of admission or for the receipt of any services or benefits.
Responsibilities
Anyone Who Maintains or Seeks Access to Education Records
Maintain and release records in accordance with FERPA and these guidelines. (http://www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html)
Office of Planning and Budgets
Maintain and provide external and internal reporting of institutional data, which may include student information.  Provide internal access and analytical reports of data for institutional studies and research.
Student
Read the Michigan State University Notification of Student Rights under FERPA and these guidelines.
University Registrar
Disseminate Michigan State University Notification of Student Rights under FERPA.
Manage the process by which students opt-out or restrict disclosure of their directory information.
Administer the process to determine whether alleged errors in education records are misleading, inaccurate, or in violation of a student’s privacy rights.
Facilitate communications with appropriate school officials and provide advice, clarification, or direction on when release of confidential information is permissible.
Facilitate all responses to third party requests, subpoenas, or judicial orders for student education records.
Oversee campus compliance, education and awareness of FERPA.
Procedures
Disclosure to Students
Inspection and Review
A currently enrolled or former student has the right to inspect and review his/her education records upon proper identification. All such requests must be made to the Office of the Registrar. Requests for access to records must be granted within a reasonable period of time, but in no case later than forty-five (45) days from the date of request. If a student is denied access to his/her education records, the student may appeal in writing to the official maintaining the records or to the University Registrar. If the decision to deny access is upheld, the school official handling the appeal must provide a written statement to the student regarding the basis for the denial within ten (10) days of the receipt of the appeal. Following the appeal, the student or the school official may request the Associate Provost for Academic Services and Enrollment Management to provide guidance on the rules and policies concerning access to education records. If the Associate Provost for Academic Services and Enrollment Management determines that the requested record is an education record to which the student may have access under FERPA and these guidelines, the record shall be made available to the student.
Applicants have the right to review records and data submitted for admission with an admissions officer. Those denied admission must exercise this right within six (6) months of the date of denial. The decision to admit or deny admission is, however, a composite professional decision not subject to review.
Amendment of Record
A currently enrolled or former student has the right to request an amendment of records that he/she believes to be inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. A request to amend a record should be made in writing to the school official maintaining the record, clearly identifying the part of the record the student wants changed and specifying why it should be changed. If the student’s request to amend is denied, the school official will notify the student in writing of the decision and the right to a formal hearing on the matter.
A request for a formal hearing on the denial of a request to amend records must be made in writing to the University Registrar. Hearings will be conducted by a school official, otherwise known as the hearing officer, who does not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. The hearing officer will provide notice to the student, reasonably in advance, of the date, place, and time of the hearing. The student will be afforded a full and fair opportunity at the hearing to present relevant evidence and is entitled to have a representative or advisor attend the hearing. 
Following the hearing, the hearing officer will prepare a report discussing his/her decision. Copies of the report will be distributed to the parties who have a legitimate educational interest in the report. If the hearing officer decides the student’s request to amend the record was improperly denied, the record shall be amended accordingly. Should the hearing officer uphold the denial, the student may appeal the hearing officer’s decision, in writing, to the Associate Provost of Enrollment and Academic Strategic Planning  within ten (10) days after notice of the decision is sent. The Associate Provost of Enrollment and Academic Strategic Planning will request an Appeals Committee, consisting of three (3) disinterested University officials, to make a final determination after reviewing records from the hearing, the hearing officer’s report, and other relevant information. If the Appeals Committee determines the student’s education record is factually incorrect, the record shall be amended accordingly. If the Appeals Committee decides to uphold the hearing officer’s denial, the student will be given an opportunity to place a written statement with the education record setting forth his/her disagreement with the decision. The student’s statement and the Appeal Committee’s decision will be maintained as part of the student’s education record for as long as the University maintains the record and may be disclosed to an authorized party when requested. The student also has the right to file a complaint with the Student Privacy Policy Office at the U.S. Department of Education.
Letters of Recommendation
Students may not have access to letters of recommendation or statements of evaluation obtained or prepared before January 1, 1975.  A student may waive his/her right to access letters of recommendation obtained after January 1, 1975.  A student who wishes to waive his/her right to access letters of recommendation must provide a signed statement of waiver to the author of the letter or the Office of the Registrar.
Disclosure to Third Parties
Personally identifiable information from a student’s education records may not be released to third parties without the student’s prior written consent, with certain exceptions.  The exceptions to the consent requirement are limited to the following:
 
  1. Disclosure to School Officials. Personally identifiable information from education records may be disclosed without written consent to school officials who have a legitimate educational interest in the records. These records may be disclosed only on a need to know basis. Specifically, a school official requesting information must have a legitimate need for the requested information for the effective functioning of his/her position or office.  Determination as to whether the need to know requirement has been satisfied is made by the head administrator for the unit retaining the information or by the Office of the Registrar. All information released may only be used for the purpose intended.

    For purposes of the school official’s exception, education records may also be disclosed without consent to contractors, consultants, and other outside parties to whom the University has outsourced institutional services or functions that it would otherwise use employees to perform, provided that the outside party is under the direct control of the University with respect to the use and maintenance of the education records and subject to the same conditions governing the use and redisclosure of education records that apply to other school officials. The outside party must sign a statement indicating its compliance with the non-redisclosure provisions of FERPA prior to receiving any student information. 
  2. Disclosure to Officials of Another School. Personally identifiable information from education records may be disclosed to officials of another school where the student seeks or intends to enroll, or where the student is already enrolled if the disclosure is for purposes related to the student’s enrollment or transfer.
  3. Disclosure of Directory Information. Information that the University has designated as directory information in the Michigan State University Notice of Directory Information may be disclosed without the student’s consent.
  4. Disclosure pursuant to Judicial Order. Personally identifiable information from education records may be released to comply with a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena. As permitted by law, reasonable attempts will be made to notify the student of the judicial order or subpoena in advance of compliance.
  5. Disclosure pursuant to Requests for Financial Aid.  Personally identifiable information from education records relevant to the student’s application for, or receipt of, financial aid may be disclosed if the information is necessary to determine eligibility, determine amount or conditions of the aid, or enforce the terms and conditions of the aid.
  6. Disclosure to Federal and State Authorities.  Authorized representatives of the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local educational authorities, may have access to education records. Disclosures under this provision may be made in connection with an audit or evaluation of federal- or state-supported education programs, or for the enforcement of or compliance with federal legal requirements that relate to those programs. These entities may make further disclosures of personally identifiable information to outside entities that are designated by them as their authorized representatives to conduct any audit, evaluation, or enforcement or compliance activity on their behalf.
  7. Disclosure to Accrediting and Professional Associations. Designated representatives of accrediting and other professional organizations with which the University is affiliated may have access to personally identifiable information to the extent necessary to fulfill the obligation of that accreditation or affiliation. 
  8. Disclosure pursuant to Student’s Delinquency on Payment. Personally identifiable information from education records may be disclosed as necessary to effect collection of a student’s financial obligations to the University.
  9. Disclosure pursuant to Litigation against the University. Personally identifiable information from education records deemed necessary for the defense of the University in a suit filed by a student may be disclosed to attorneys representing the University. 
  10. Disclosure pursuant to the University’s Obligations to Support Study and Research.  The University may disclose personally identifiable information from a student’s education records without consent if the disclosure is to an organization conducting studies for, or on behalf of, the University to: (a) develop, validate, or administer predictive tests; (b) administer student aid programs; or (c) improve instruction.  Requests for access to student education records under the studies exception must be approved by the Office of the Registrar.  Such requests will be fulfilled, if possible, by information from which all identification of the student has been removed.

    The written agreement between the University and the organization conducting the study must specify the purpose, scope, and duration of the study and the information to be disclosed; require the organization to use personally identifiable information from education records only to meet the purposes of the study; limit any disclosures of personally identifiable information to individuals in the organization who have a legitimate interest in the information; and require the organization to destroy all personally identifiable information within a specified time period when the information is no longer needed for the purposes of the study.

    For information related to conducting approved research involving surveys, please review the “Procedure to Request Confidential Student Data in Support of University Research” (http://reg.msu.edu/read/pdf/ResearchProcedure.pdf). For information concerning mass e-mail distribution related to approved research, please also review the “Appropriate Use of MSU E-mail Services by Internal Users on MSUNET” (https://tech.msu.edu/about/guidelines-policies/appropriate-use-msu-email/)
  11. Disclosure to Protect the Health and Safety of an Individual. The University may disclose personally identifiable information from education records to appropriate parties including, but not limited to, parents of an eligible student, whose knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or another individual if there is a significant and articulable threat to the health or safety of a student or other individual, considering the totality of the circumstances. The University must record the articulable and significant threat that formed the basis for the disclosure and the parties to whom the information was disclosed. 
  12. Disclosure Pursuant to the Wetterling Act, 42 U.S.C. 14071. The University may disclose without consent personally identifiable information received under the Wetterling Act about a student who is required to register as a sex offender.
  13. Disclosure of Results of a Disciplinary Proceeding. The final results of a disciplinary proceeding may be disclosed if the school determines that the student is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense and the student has committed a violation of the school’s rules or policies with respect to the allegation made against him/her. 
Parents or Legal Guardians
The University does not make disclosures of information to parents or legal guardians without written consent from the student.  However, consistent with FERPA, the University does not need a student’s consent to release information from education records to parents or other appropriate individuals in the case of health and safety emergencies. The University may also disclose to parents without consent information regarding their student’s violation of any federal, state, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the University, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance, if the University determines the student committed a disciplinary violation and the student is under the age of 21.
Data Requests
All academic and administrative units at the University seeking student and institutional data have: (1) full access to the Enrollment and Term-End Reports through the Office of the Registrar (https://reg.msu.edu/RoInfo/EnrTermEndRpts.aspx); (2) full access to Institutional Research and historical data reports through the Office of Planning and Budgets (https://opb.msu.edu/functions/institution/datadigest/index.html); and (3) restricted access to the Student Information Generator (https://reg.msu.edu/Forms/StuInfoGen/Menu.aspx).

Requests for student information beyond the scope of the systems referenced above should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar using the Data Request Form available at: https://reg.msu.edu/Forms/DataRequest/DataRequest.aspx.

Only the Office of the Registrar and the Office of Planning and Budgets are authorized to fulfill such requests. All other units and organizations may not release student or institutional data without prior approval from the appropriate Vice-President and the Office of the Provost.

If the data request involves confidential student data and University research, please review the “Procedure to Request Confidential Student Data in Support of University Research” (http://www.reg.msu.edu/read/pdf/ResearchProcedure.pdf).

Requests from recognized educational or governmental organizations for student or institutional data should be addressed to:
    Michigan State University
    Associate Registrar for Academic Records
    Hannah Administration Building
    426 Auditorium Road, Room 150
    East Lansing, MI  48824-2603

All data requests are subject to review and approval for compliance with FERPA and University policies.

The University does not release student information for commercial purposes.
Requests which require extensive labor, interfere with regular operations, or require data in specific formats (e.g. mailing labels) may be denied or charged a fee for the service. An estimate of the fees may be provided upon request.
Freedom of Information Act
The Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”), M.C.L. 15.231 et seq., regulates and sets requirements for the disclosure of public records by all public bodies in the state. FOIA provides that all public records of a public body are subject to disclosure unless specifically exempted by the Act. A public body may, but is not required to, withhold from disclosure those categories of public records exempt from disclosure under the Act. FOIA requests seeking student records, including directory information about a student, may be denied on a statutory exemption for records protected by FERPA, privacy, or other available exemptions. All FOIA requests must be submitted to:
    Michigan State University
    Freedom of Information Act Office
    408 West Circle Drive
    Room 177 Olds Hall
    East Lansing, MI  48824
Further Information
If circumstances arise involving release of confidential information that are not covered in the University’s Academic Programs catalog or by these guidelines, please contact the Office of the Registrar for assistance.

Protection of University Functions and Services General Student Regulations, 5.00

Functions, services, and processes of the University must be protected if the institution is to be effective in discharging its responsibilities; therefore, no student shall:

5.01 knowingly provide false information to any office, agency, or individual acting on behalf of the University.
5.02 obstruct, disrupt, or interfere with the functions, services, or directives of the University, its offices, or its employees (e.g., classes, social, cultural, and athletic events, computing services, registration, housing and food services, governance meetings, and hearings).
5.03 alter or forge any University document and/or record, including identification materials, issued or used by the University.
5.04 allow any University equipment, document and/or record, including identification materials, issued by the University for one’s own use to be used by another.
5.05 use any University equipment document and/or record for other than its authorized purpose, including identification materials issued to another.
5.06 act or represent oneself as an agent of the University (including the ability to provide University services) unless authorized to do so.
5.07 fail to properly identify oneself or present University-issued identification when requested to do so by a non-law enforcement University employee acting in the performance of assigned job responsibilities or who has a reasonable suspicion that the student may be involved in the violation of a University policy or regulation.
5.08 sell or make contracts for purchase or delivery of any commercial merchandise or services for personal profit or gain, or solicit voluntary contributions for organizations, without proper authorization.
5.09 violate other University policies or regulations, including University housing policies.

Counterfeiting, Altering and Copying MSU Ordinances, 14.00

14.01 False copy
14.02 Possession of false copy
14.03 Unauthorized keys

.01  No person with intent to injure or defraud shall falsely make, forge, manufacture, print, reproduce, copy, tamper with, or alter, any writing, record, document or identification used or maintained by Michigan State University.

.02  No person shall knowingly possess, display or cause or permit to be displayed any writing, record, document, or identification form used or maintained by Michigan State University knowing the same to be fictitious, altered, forged, counterfeited or made without proper authority.

.03 No person without proper authority shall knowingly possess, make, or cause to be made, any key, card, or unlocking device, to operate any lock or locking mechanism used or maintained by Michigan State University.



Policy on Religious Observance

It has always been the policy of the University to permit students and faculty to observe those holidays set aside by their chosen religious faith.

The faculty and staff should be sensitive to the observance of these holidays so that students who absent themselves from classes on these days are not seriously disadvantaged. It is the responsibility of those students who wish to be absent to make arrangements in advance with their instructors. It is also the responsibility of those faculty who wish to be absent to make arrangements in advance with their chairpersons, who shall assume the responsibility for covering their classes.

As Michigan State University has become increasingly multicultural, the incidence of conflicts between mandatory academic requirements and religious observances has increased. In the absence of a simple and dignified way to determine the validity of individual claims, the claim of a religious conflict should be accepted at face value. Be aware that some degrees of observance may have a more extensive period of observance. Instructors may expect a reasonable limit to the number of requests by any one student. Some instructors attempt to cover all reasons for student absences from required academic events such as quizzes or exams with a blanket policy, e.g., allowing the student to drop one grade or two quizzes without penalty. If this is meant to extend to religious observances, the instructor should state this clearly at the beginning of the term. If instructors require make-up exams, they retain the right to determine the content of the exams and the conditions of administration, giving due consideration to equitable treatment.


Policy on Grief Absence

The faculty and staff should be sensitive to and accommodate the bereavement process of a student who has lost a family member or who is experiencing emotional distress from a similar tragedy so that the student is not academically disadvantaged in their classes or other academic work (e.g. research). For undergraduate and master’s (Plan B) students without research responsibilities, it is the responsibility of the student to: a) notify the Associate Dean or designee of their college of the need for a grief absence in a timely manner, but no later than one week from the student’s initial knowledge of the situation, b) provide appropriate verification of the grief absence as specified by the Associate Dean, and c) complete all missed work as determined in consultation with the instructor. It is the responsibility of the Associate Dean or designee to: a) determine with the student the expected period of absence – it is expected that some bereavement processes may be more extensive than others depending on individual circumstances, b) notify the faculty that the student will be absent, and c) receive verification of the authenticity of a grief absence request upon the student’s return. It is the responsibility of the instructor to work with the student to make reasonable accommodations and to include appropriate language describing such accommodations in their course syllabus, so that the student is not penalized due to a verified grief absence.

For master’s (Plan A), master’s (Plan B) with research responsibilities, and doctoral students, it is the responsibility of the student to: a) notify their advisor/major professor and faculty of the courses in which they are enrolled of the need for a grief absence in a timely manner, but no later than one week from the student’s initial knowledge of the situation, b) provide appropriate verification of the grief absence as specified by the advisor/major professor and faculty, and c) complete all missed work as determined in consultation with the advisor/major professor and faculty. It is the responsibility of the advisor/major professor to: a) determine with the student the expected period of absence – it is expected that some bereavement processes may be more extensive than others depending on individual circumstances, b) receive verification of the authenticity of a grief absence request upon the student’s return, and c) make reasonable accommodations so that the student is not penalized due to a verified grief absence. If employed as a RA or TE, the graduate student must also notify their employer. Both employer and student will swiftly communicate to determine how the student’s responsibilities will be covered during their absence. Graduate teaching assistants (TAs) should refer to the bereavement policy in the MSU GEU CBU Article 18.

Students in the graduate professional colleges (CHM, COM, CVM, LAW) with their own grief absence policies are excluded from the above and should follow their own policies.

Students who believe their rights under this policy have been violated should contact the University Ombudsperson.

 


Policy on Military Leave

Guideline for accommodating absences for military service:
The university, in compliance with agreements to support students who are serving on active duty or with reserve components of the United States military, will reasonably accommodate student military service obligations regarding leave and readmission.

Upon receipt of orders resulting in an impending short-term or long-term leave, students must request a verification of absence letter from the Student Veterans Resource Center within five working days of receiving their orders. Students must present supporting documentation at the time of request for verification. Students using VA education benefits must also submit a copy of their orders to the school certifying officials in the Registrar’s Office.
 
It is the student’s responsibility to request accommodation for their leave by notifying all instructors and discussing a plan for missed materials and course assessments within five working days from receipt of the verification. It is the course instructor’s responsibility to provide reasonable opportunities for students to complete course assignments and assessments missed due to military absence based on the guidance below.
 
Short-term leave procedures for military service:
A short-term leave is defined as an absence from the University for 14 consecutive calendar days or less. Accommodations may be requested on a course-by-course basis.

Course instructors should make reasonable accommodations to allow students to make progress in the course and complete work that provides assessment of the course’s learning outcomes. In cases where there is significant concern for a student’s opportunity for successful completion of the course learning outcomes, the student and instructor should work with the Student Veterans Resource Center and academic unit to discuss alternative resolutions that minimize academic disadvantages to the student.
 
In the event it is in the student’s best interest to drop a course(s) because of serious academic disadvantage, the university will issue a full refund of the course tuition and fees.
 
Long-term leave procedures for military service:
A long-term leave is defined as an absence from the University for 15 consecutive calendar days or more. A student whose military service will require more than 15 days of leave from the University has three options:

  1. A student may withdraw, in-full or in-part, from the semester with proof of military orders that exceed 15 days. In such cases, the student will receive a full refund of any tuition and fees paid for the term in which the student withdraws.
  2. A student may discuss absences with individual instructors to make accommodations for competition of required coursework, or equivalent assessments, during a mutually agreed upon timeframe. If the timeframe meets the criteria for an extension or incomplete in the course, the student must comply with university policies related to this decision.
  3. Students may choose a combination of dropping individual courses and planning to complete other courses, depending on the guidance of their instructors, keeping the student’s academic success and progress at the forefront of consideration. If a student chooses to drop multiple courses, the student will also be entitled to a full refund for each course.
If military leave results in a student’s need to be readmitted to MSU, the student and institution will comply with 34 Code of Federal Regulations section 668.18 (https://www.govinfo.gov/app/details/CFR-2011-title34-vol3/CFR-2011-title34-vol3-sec668-18).
 
Graduate students concerned about their time to degree should work with their graduate advisor and Graduate Program Director to request a time extension from the MSU Graduate School. Although extensions are not guaranteed, they are considered for the each student’s unique situation.
 

Library Lending Policies

Borrowers are responsible for understanding these polices. Disregard for these policies may result in permanent suspension of borrowing privileges.

Borrower Responsibilities and Lending Policies

  1. Care of Library Materials

    Material must be returned in the same condition as when it was checked out.  Borrowers may not write in books, turn down page corners, or use “post-it”-type notes/flags or a fine may be issued.
     
  2. Responsibilities Regarding Addresses

    You must keep the library updated with your current mailing address and email address. MSU borrowers must assure that email from msu.edu is not diverted to spam quarantine files.
     
  3. Checking Out Material

    To check out material, an MSU ID or a library card along with photo ID must be presented. Borrowers are responsible for knowing the date material is due and returning (or renewing) it promptly. Material may not be checked out for others.
     
  4. Renewals

    Library material must be renewed in order to extend the due date.  Borrowers may renew eligible material online up to five times at https://lib.msu.edu/general/account/. Some material is not eligible for renewal.
     
  5. Main Library Loan Periods

    Some materials cannot be checked out at all. Reserve materials circulate for 2 hours, 24 hours, 3 days, or 7 days. Loan periods for most other types of library material: Faculty/Staff/Students – 180 days, Spouses and Community Borrowers – 21 days.
     
  6. Get It @ MSU

    If you need material that is checked out, or that MSU Libraries does not own, request the material from another library by visiting http://lib.msu.edu/about/ils/.
     
  7. Recalled Material

    Recalled material must be returned by the recall due date to avoid fines.  To prevent recall fines while away from MSU, material should be returned before leaving or arrangements made for someone to return recalled items.
     
  8. Returning Material

    Return DVDs, videos, CDs, records, and items from Reserve, Reference, Art, Maps, Music, and Software to the desk where they were checked out.  Place other material in any book return at the Main Library or mail it to Michigan State University Libraries, Circulation, 366 W. Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824.
     
  9. Fines and Bills

    Fines and bills are the responsibility of the borrower regardless of being away from campus, vacations, exams, illness, car trouble, unread MSU e-mail, late or never-received reminder notices, etc. Material returned after closing is not considered returned until the next day the library is open. Overdue fines are charged for the following high-demand items: Reserves, Technology Lab material and equipment: $1.00/Hour; Recalled material, software, CDs, records, videos and DVDs:  $1/day; Material borrowed from other libraries:  $2/day. When an item is significantly overdue, the borrower is billed, and holds are placed on MSU student enrollment, registration, diplomas, and transcripts. Minimum replacement charges are $150. When a billed item is returned, the replacement charge is cancelled but overdue fines may still be charged. Unresolved bills may be turned over to a collection agency any time after 30 days from date of issue. Payment may be made by mail (Michigan State University Libraries, Circulation, 366 W. Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824), at the Circulation Desk, or by calling 1-517.355.2333.
     
  10. Library Cards for Michigan Residents

    Michigan residents over the age of 18 may apply for community privileges by showing a valid Michigan driver’s license/ID containing the individual’s address. Cards will not be issued if the address is a Post Office Box. Two books can be checked out on the day the card is created. After receiving the card in the mail, community borrowers may have no more than 25 items checked out at one time and are not eligible to use one-day lockers. Community borrower cards expire after two years, at which time a community borrower must reapply for a library card.
     
  11. Accommodation for Persons with Disabilities

    Accommodation related to checking out library material may be requested calling 1-517.884.6458 or by e-mailing atc@lib.msu.edu.
     
  12. Michigan Law and University Policies

    Michigan Compiled Law (MCL750.391) defines damaging library material (or keeping it overdue) as larceny. The confidentiality of library records in the State of Michigan is protected by "The Library Privacy Act," Michigan Compiled Laws (MCL 397.601-606, Act 455 of 1982).  Federal law may supersede Michigan Law. Removing material from the MSU Libraries without checking it out may result in criminal charges. MSU ID cards are property of MSU. If used by anyone other than the owner, an MSU ID will be confiscated.

Commencement

Students expecting to graduate must file an application on or before the end of first week of the fall or spring semester to assure a certification check and listing of their name in the commencement program. Summer graduates must apply by the first week of spring semester.

Applications must be filed with the Office of the Registrar at www.reg.msu.edu.

Degrees are granted with a fall, spring, or summer effective date when all graduation requirements are met. Michigan State University supports fall and spring commencement exercises for the awarding of bachelor's, master's, educational specialist, and doctoral degrees.

Transcripts and diplomas are held until all financial holds have been paid in full. However, the Student Accounts Office may release a transcript directly to a prospective employer on an exception basis.

Visit www.commencement.msu.edu for additional information.


The Campus

The Michigan State University campus in East Lansing occupies 5,218 contiguous acres and has long been recognized as one of the most beautiful in the nation. The developed campus comprises 2,100 acres, and the remaining 3,118 acres are devoted to experimental farms, outlying research facilities, and a 36-hole golf course. Combined, the developed campus and farms area also contain 25 natural areas which encompass more than 700 acres. The gently-rolling campus is graced by a park-like landscape, traversed by the scenic tree-lined Red Cedar River. Campus beauty is enhanced by a mature collection of trees, shrubs, and woody vines that serve teaching, research and outreach functions with over 36,000 plants accounted for in an interactive digital database. Planting of trees on the campus began shortly after its founding in 1855. A more formal collection of trees was initiated on campus in 1874 in what is known as the Campus Arboretum Collection. The rich campus open space complements and unifies the 571 permanent university buildings that provide over 24.9 million gross square feet of space to serve the institution’s land-grant mission.

The spacious campus arboretum is punctuated at intervals by focal points of plant interest.  Notable among these are the W. J. Beal Botanical Garden, the Horticultural Demonstration Gardens, the 4-H Children’s Garden, the C.E. Lewis Landscape Arboretum, the West Circle Drive loop, and the Sanford, Red Cedar, Baker, Beal Pinetum, Bear Lake, and Toumey Natural Areas. The W.J. Beal Botanical Garden was established in 1873 to support teaching, research and community outreach across campus. Besides being one of the very first continuously operated campus botanical gardens in North America, it is the site where hybrid maize was first developed by Professor Beal, and is still the place where the longest running science experiment in history is ongoing today. The 2,500 plant taxa in the labeled beds are organized into systematic, and economic collections. The adjoining slopes have many more species that comprise regional ecological and landscape groupings. Besides providing accessioned plant materials annually for millions of dollars of grant supported research, the Beal Botanical Garden also participates in a robust International Seed Exchange and shares and develops plant biology information with hundreds of botanical gardens worldwide. The Horticultural Demonstration Gardens, which showcase beautiful displays of over 1,200 varieties of flowering plants, are used for instruction and demonstration and for testing the performance of plants in the climate of central Michigan. They include both All-American Trial and Euro-Select Trial Gardens for annual plants and an All-American Display Garden for roses. Natural areas on the campus are protected vestiges of our natural heritage and include Toumey Woodlot, an old-growth beech-maple forest designated by the U.S. Department of the Interior as a Natural Landmark. Management of the natural areas is held to a minimum necessary to assure that their manifold teaching, research, recreational, and inspirational values will continue to serve generations of future students, staff, and faculty.

 


Abrams Planetarium

The Abrams Planetarium is an acknowledged leader in the popularization of astronomy. It is named after Dr. Talbert "Ted" and Mrs. Leota Abrams, who generously gave the original gift of $250,000 over 50 years ago. Today, the building features a 140-seat Sky Theater housing a digital full-dome projector, a black light gallery, an exhibit hall, and gift counter.

The major goals of the planetarium include offering engaging multimedia presentations that always contain a live presentation to the public, tailored program for the needs of K-12 students, and up-to-date undergraduate education across disciplines through collaboration with people across campus and the community.

Star shows and other events are offered to the public on weekends and special occasions. Visitors to the exhibit hall are welcome between 9:30 a.m. and noon and 1:00 p.m. an 4:30 p.m. on weekdays.

For more information and a full listing of our offerings visit www.abramsplanetarium.org.



 


Alumni Memorial Chapel

Nestled amidst trees and lawns that slope gently down to the Red Cedar River stands the picturesque Alumni Memorial Chapel. Dedicated on June 7, 1952, the Chapel’s simple elegance, timbered ceilings, stained glass windows and collegiate gothic charm are among the reasons many choose this location to celebrate weddings, baptisms, memorials, family celebrations and more. Accommodating all faiths, each ceremony is treated with the same respect and reverence. The chapel was built “in honor of those who served their country” and “in memory of those students and alumni who made the supreme sacrifice.” More than 5,000 alumni and friends of the university raised the initial $200,000 to build the chapel. The chapel seats 160 people and is also home to various performances sponsored by the MSU College of Music including those on the new, state-of-the-art, custom-made pipe organ, the Red Cedar Organ. To reserve the MSU Alumni Memorial Chapel, call 1-517-432-2446.
 


Athletic Facilities

Michigan State University has extensive facilities supporting intercollegiate athletics. The Jenison Field House has complete synthetic surfacing for track and a seating capacity of 5,017 for volleyball, gymnastics, and wrestling events. The Breslin Student Events Center and Berkowitz Basketball Complex, a multipurpose building, has two auxiliary gymnasiums for practice. Breslin has a seating capacity of 14,797 for basketball games and other student events. The Munn Ice Arena is available for ice hockey, skating, and athletic events with a seating capacity of 6,470. The full-service MSU Tennis Center has eight indoor tennis courts, offers a wide variety of tennis programs for MSU and the greater Lansing community and has a seating capacity of 1,200. Twenty varsity and recreational tennis courts are located south of the Duffy Daugherty/Skandalaris Football Center. Spartan Stadium has a playing area covered with grass and is used for football games and for large outdoor occasions. It has a seating capacity of 75,005. The Duffy Daugherty Building/Skandalaris Football Center has a full-size indoor football field and a 16,500-square- foot weight room. The two 18-hole Forest Akers Golf Courses were financed in part through a gift from Forest Akers, a long-time member of the University governing board. Included with the courses are all-weather, year-round driving ranges, practice greens and the Lasch Family Golf Center. Old College Field is the location of the Secchia Stadium for softball, DeMartin Soccer Complex and McLane Baseball Stadium at Kobs Field. The field hockey, track and field facility, known as the Ralph Young Field, has an all-weather track and artificial turf infield available to students and faculty. Clara Bell Smith Student-Athlete Academic Center is a 31,000-square-foot facility that houses a computer lab with 74 stations, a 210-seat auditorium, two 70-seat study areas, 10 individual tutorial rooms and 10 staff offices. Rowing facilities are located adjacent to the Grand River in Lansing.
 


MSU Auditorium

Both Fairchild Theatre (464 seats) and the main Auditorium (3,152 seats) feature a variety of performing arts events as well as formal lectures and commencement ceremonies. The classrooms, studios and offices of the Department of Theatre are in this building. The main Auditorium and Fairchild Theatre are managed by Wharton Center for Performing Arts, and used by the College of Music and Department of Theatre for performances and instructional activities.

 


Beaumont Tower

This familiar landmark stands on the site of the first building in America where agriculture was taught as a science on a university campus. The tower contains a 49-bell carillon.

 


Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum

The Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum is an engaged public institution that reflects the longstanding interdisciplinary focus of Michigan State University. The MSU Broad Art Museum connects people with art in ways that inspire curiosity and inquiry through a rotation of exhibitions featuring local, national, and international artists, a permanent collection of over 10,000 works, and dynamic programming. With a focus on the art of our time—in dialogue with the historical—the museum encourages engagement with issues of local relevance and global significance.

Because the MSU Broad Art Museum values access to meaningful art experiences, admission and membership are always free.

For more information, visit www.broadmuseum.msu.edu, e-mail eebam@msu.edu, or call 1-517-884-4800.
 


International Center

Built in 1963 and substantially expanded in 2002, the Delia Koo International Academic Center continues to be the hub of international activity at Michigan State University. Housed within the International Center is the Office of International Studies and Programs (ISP), a university-level office led by an associate provost and dean. ISP supports and encourages international activities throughout the institution, and within ISP are offices with responsibility for education abroad, international students and scholars, international research and Peace Corps recruiting, international health and safety, as well as area studies centers focusing on Africa, Asia, Canada, Europe, Russia, Eurasia and Latin America and the Caribbean. ISP has strong ties to thematic international units across the campus that focus on international agriculture, business, education, engineering, gender, youth, health, and languages. Global Youth Advancement Network (GYAN), Global Center for Food Systems Innovation, Visiting International Professionals Program, Global Innovations in Development, Engagement, and Scholarship (Global IDEAS), and visiting international scholars affiliated with the international and thematic centers also have offices here. The International Center also houses the Volunteer English Tutoring Program, a language-tutoring program for the international community, and is available for use by MSU’s many other international centers and institutes. ISP hosts a myriad of international conferences, seminars, colloquia, and workshops. Other residents include the Cross-roads Food Court, MSU ID Office and the Spartan Bookstore. In addition to offices and meeting space, the International Center also offers room 115 just off the lobby. Primarily used as a classroom, room 115 is available for large meetings and is often the site of academic governance sessions during fall and spring semesters. To request use of room 115, contact classroom scheduling in the Office of the Registrar. Registered student organizations may request use of the lobby area through the Department of Student Life for various cultural, social and recreational activities. Similarly, the International Center also hosts events sponsored by the University Activities Board.

 


Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center

Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center plays a key role in the fulfillment of the university’s land grant mission. Built in 1951 in partnership with the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the Kellogg Center has been a model facility for continuing education. Today, Kellogg Center serves as the primary location for university-sponsored seminar and outreach programs, extending expertise and resources to the entire state and around the world. Each year, hundreds of thousands of people participate in conferences and workshops. Available to the public as well as the university community, the Kellogg Center is a hub for community activities, corporate meetings and social events. Kellogg Center is a full-service conference center and hotel with guest rooms, including five suites, flexible function space, meeting rooms, banquet rooms, private dining rooms, and professional conference and event coordinators. Also located in this state-of-the-art conference facility are the teaching laboratories for The School of Hospitality Business and the State Room Restaurant which features upscale casual dining on site and Spartan Spirit Shop where you will find only the best Spartan apparel and gifts and some unique items that you can't find anywhere else in East Lansing!
 


Kresge Art Center

A gift of the S. S. Kresge Foundation, this building houses the Department of Art, Art History, and Design. Among its resources are lecture classrooms for art history and disciplinary studios for ceramics, drawing, electronic art and intermedia, graphic design, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. Other resources housed within the Kresge Art Center include: a woodshop, a professional lighting studio for documentation of artwork, two digital labs, a print lab, a state-of-the-art electronic fabrication, prototyping and sculpture facility, a visual resource library, and an art store/café. The Department of Art, Art History, and Design Gallery 101 and 114 provide additional exhibition space and feature rotating exhibits throughout the year. All gallery exhibits are open to the public. For additional information call 1-517-355-7610, e-mail art@msu.edu or visit www.art.msu.edu.


Michigan State University Museum

The MSU Museum is the science and culture museum at Michigan State University. The Museum features three floors and 15 galleries of changing and long-term exhibit spaces. Long-term exhibits include the Science On a Sphere Gallery that houses one of the world’s most dynamic learning technologies for visualizing data. In addition to exhibits and engaging community events, the Museum houses over one million artifacts and specimens. The Museum is the repository of significant collections in natural sciences, archaeology, folk arts, and history from around the world. For more information, visit www.museum.msu.edu; call 1-517-355-2370 or email museum@msu.edu for general inquiries.


 


MSU Union

The MSU Union is a busy student and alumni hub offering shopping, dining, flexible event space and convenient amenities designed to serve the Michigan State University community. Located at the corner of Abbot Road and Grand River Avenue, it's easily accessible by all methods of transportation. The MSU Union is located at the entrance to north campus, within a park-like atmosphere. In keeping with location’s storied past, the MSU Union acts as a central meeting place for students, faculty, staff, alums and university guests to experience cultural, educational and social activities. Services available at the MSU Union include:

Admissions Welcome Room MSU Union Food Court
Cap and Gown Rental and Purchase MSU Tours
Classrooms 50, 55 MOSAIC Multicultural and Unity Center
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) North Neighborhood Engagement Center
Commencement Merchandise Nursing Mothers Room
Community Police Office Quiet Study Lounge
Computer Labs Spartan Spirit Shop
Meeting and Conference Space Sparty's Express
MSU Federal Credit Union

The MSU Union also provides campus-wide student activities through the University Activities Board (UAB) with events held at a variety of campus locations. Registered Student Organizations (RSOs) can use the MSU Union for meetings and events. Other interested parties can book space within the union for meetings, conferences and special events, with Kellogg Catering our preferred caterer. Contact the Sales department at 517-432-2446 or email Amy Williams at will1760@msu.edu. You can also visit us at msuunion.com.


Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education

The Michigan State University Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education opened in 1997 and combines auditorium, classroom, arena, and exhibit spaces. Exhibit space covers 66,240 square feet and can accommodate 368 animal stalls that can be removed to create open space for a variety of events. The arena seats 2,000 people and has a show floor of 28,670 square feet. The auditorium seats 400 and is used for meetings, auctions, and livestock industry events. An event office, showers, livestock wash racks, public address system, Michigan State University concession stand, and recreational vehicle hook-ups are available for Pavilion events.


Student Services Building

The Student Services Building is home to the Division of Student Life and Engagement and several of its units, including the Office of the Assistant Vice Presidents for Students Involvement and Leadership; Student Development and External Relations; and Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging, the Career Services Network; Student Life; Office of Cultural and Academic Transitions; The Gender and Sexuality Campus Center; the Student Veterans Resource Center; Women*s Student Services, Student and Community Relations; Fraternity and Sorority Life; and the Center for Community Engaged Learning. Other offices in the building include the Office of Financial Aid, Center for Survivors, Health Promotions, Recovery Room, ASMSU, as well as the administrative offices for the Eli Broad Art Museum.
 


Wharton Center for Performing Arts

Wharton Center, located in the heart of MSU's campus at the corner of Bogue Street and Shaw Lane, was founded on the belief that art is a dimension of culture that should be shared with and made accessible to all. Through diverse programming and inclusive initiatives—like Sensory-Friendly Performances, ASL-interpretation, and Audio Description, among other programs—Wharton Center strives to inspire and connect with the creative spirit in everyone. Wharton Center serves the community by bringing the best in touring Broadway shows, innovative dance companies, top classical musicians, and jazz artists to Mid-Michigan, as well as hosting performances by the Department of Theatre, College of Music, and the Lansing Symphony Orchestra. Through performing arts and arts education, Wharton Center is committed to fostering confidence, creativity, cooperation, and empathy. Wharton Center Institute for Arts and Creativity collaborates with MSU's Department of Theatre, College of Osteopathic Medicine, and College of Music, among others, on a variety of innovative projects; music and dance masterclasses; and storytelling and improvisation workshops. In addition, the Institute offers summer musical theatre classes led by Broadway professionals, and numerous community and school programs that educate and inspire more than 30,000 learners each year. Wharton Center offers internships and student employment and is supported by an MSU student marketing team. Full-time MSU students receive ticket discounts, including $29 for most MSUFCU Broadway Series performances and $19 for most Performing Arts events. For more information on Wharton Center programs,  visit www.whartoncenter.com.


Campus Activities

Michigan State University is a community which provides diverse co-curricular opportunities. There are excellent professional programs provided through seminar series sponsored by departments and schools and supplemented by open lectures on a variety of current topics. Lectures, music, theatre, art, recreation, athletics and the programs of student organizations offer opportunities for pursuing individual interests.

 


Arts


Art

The Department of Art, Art History, and Design organizes exhibitions featuring undergraduate and graduate students, alumni, and work resulting from national and international juried exhibition calls in the Kresge Art Center Galleries 101 and 114, MSU Union Art Gallery, and off-campus at (SCENE) Metrospace. Each academic year, the department hosts 15 to 20 free public visiting artist and scholar lectures. Annually the department features undergraduate research in the Art History and Visual Culture Symposium, the Apparel and Textile Design Fashion Show, and the Undergraduate Juried Exhibition. Students completing their M.F.A. present their graduate student research each spring in the Master of Fine Arts Exhibition at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum. All students are welcome to view exhibitions, attend lecture series events, and join in activities offered by the department. For additional information call 1-517-355-7610, email art@msu.edu or visit www.art.msu.edu.

 


Theatre and Dance

The Department of Theatre sponsors a wide variety of productions including dance-related events. Productions occur at the Pasant Theatre in the Wharton Center for Performing Arts, the Fairchild Theatre, Arena Theatre, and Studio 60 Theatre in the Auditorium, the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities Auditorium, and site-specific locations. Graduate and undergraduate talent is featured in these productions, and all students of the university are invited to participate.

Student theatrical productions occur throughout the year in the Arena Theatre and Studio 60 Theatre. Dance performances are also sponsored by the Michigan State University student dance association, ORCHESIS. Summer Circle Theatre offers students the opportunity to be involved in theatre production during the months of May and June. For additional information, call 1-517-355-6690, e-mail: theatre@msu.edu, or visit www.theatre.msu.edu.

 


Music

The College of Music offers many opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to hear and participate in a variety of musical ensembles. All qualified students are welcome to audition regardless of their fields of study.

Vocal groups include the MSU Chorale, State Singers, Campus Choir, Women's Glee Club, Choral Union, Women's Chamber Ensemble, and Men's Glee Club. The University Symphony Orchestra and the Concert Orchestra present numerous concerts throughout the year. The University Bands  include the Wind Symphony, Symphony Band, Concert Band, Campus Band, the 300-member Spartan Marching Band, and three Spartan Brass Bands that perform at basketball and hockey games. The Jazz Studies area includes three jazz orchestras and numerous octets and ensembles. Additionally, there are several chamber music groups including Musique 21, Percussion Ensemble, Trombone Choir, and Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble. For additional information call 1-517-353-5340 or visit www.music.msu.edu.


Athletics

Michigan State University and its Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is a proud member of the Big Ten Conference and sponsors 23 varsity sport programs, 11 for men (baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, ice hockey, soccer, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field, and wrestling) and 12 for women (basketball, cross country, field hockey, golf, gymnastics, rowing, soccer, softball, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field, and volleyball).

The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is committed to operating an athletics program that pursues excellence with integrity, produces a positive public identity for the university and surrounding community, promotes sportslike and ethical conduct and demonstrates a commitment to compliance with all pertinent regulatory agencies.

In addition, the department's mission statement is student-athlete focused as it states "we create opportunities for student athletes to succeed academically, athletically, and in their life's pursuit, valuing all within our community while ensuring their health, safety, and wellness" and is committed to core values that emphasize integrity, respect, accountability, positive attitude, continuous improvement and one focus.


 


Programming Organizations


Class Councils

The Class Councils (senior, junior, sophomore, and freshman) consists of up to 25 students, each chosen to represent the views of and initiate activities for  Michigan State University. During the year, the Class Councils are involved in sponsoring workshops, hosting events pertinent to their class and coordinating special projects. For more information, contact ASMSU at 1-517-355-8266, or https://asmsu.msu.edu/.


University Activities Board

The University Activities Board (UAB) programs events for students, by students, to enhance the Spartan experience at Michigan State University.  UAB strives to provide unique, high quality experiences that contribute to student growth. Involving the diverse student body, we aspire to have a substantial impact on campus life and for every student to graduate with a UAB memory. Our core values are: Inclusion, Collaboration, Student Voice, Flexibility, Accessibility, and Development. Our events include live music, comedians, craft nights, open mic nights and so much more. UAB membership is free and open to all MSU undergraduate students.  Visit www.uabevents.com or@UABatMSU on Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter, phone 1-517-355-3354 or e-mail: uab@msu.edu.


Recreational Sports and Fitness Services

Recreational Sports and Fitness Services are dedicated to promoting learning experiences by engaging the University community in healthy lifestyles through sport, fitness and recreational opportunities. 

Programs are facilitated through the following fully accessible facilities.

IM SPORTS WEST, our largest facility, provides courts for paddleball, racquetball, handball, and squash; gyms for basketball, volleyball, and badminton; a turf arena for soccer, tennis and club sports, an indoor swimming pool; a cycling studio and a contemporary fitness center.

IM SPORTS EAST provides courts for basketball, volleyball, paddleball, racquetball, wally ball, and squash; a four-lane running track; a fitness center; a cycling studio and a multipurpose room for group fitness classes.

IM SPORTS CIRCLE, an accessible facility, contains gymnasiums for basketball and badminton; a swimming pool; and a multipurpose activity room. 

DEMONSTRATION HALL arena is used for intramural leagues, club sports and adaptive recreation. Please search our website for adaptive sports offered. 

MSU SAILING CENTER provides learn-to-sail classes for adults and children. You may also rent stand up paddleboards, canoes and kayaks. For more information visit www.msusailing.com.

Outdoor Space: 27 acres of outdoor recreational field space where many of our intramural sports are played. Be sure to check out the new turf complex on Service road. Two fully lighted turf fields open fall 2022. Lighted tennis courts, sand volleyball and basketball courts.

You may also join our structured competitive intramural sports or try out for one of the twenty Club Sport teams. Learn to Swim or Sail in our non-credit classes. 

Activate your membership for our facilities online. We have fitness centers at IM Sports West and IM Sports East. You can also join in-person and online Group Exercise classes. Drop in to play a variety of sports shoot some hoops or swim laps.

For more information, visit www.recsports.msu.edu,  Facebook MSU-Recreational-Sports-And-Fitness-Services, Instagram @ MSU_RecSports, or visit YouTube at www.youtube.com/watch?v=LaUzk5vXMfU.


Religious Activities

Michigan State University considers  one of its responsibilities to maintain an atmosphere of religious freedom for individuals. There are many student religious centers in East Lansing, devoting their facilities to meeting student needs. These have staffs of ministers, priests, rabbis, spiritual leaders and directors of student activities. The groups provide Michigan State University students with the chance to participate in religious worship, programs, and the opportunity to meet other students through social activities. See Student Organizations for the current list of student religious groups. A list of the members of the Religious Advisors Association can be found at https://msu.edu/~msuraa/memberorganizations.html. The Alumni Memorial Chapel, on campus, is available for public services of a religious nature. It is also made available to students wishing to enter the sanctuary for private devotions. For scheduling, contact the MSU Union, 1-517-884-8127.

For more information, visit www.msuunion.com
 


Reflection Room

The MSU Reflection Room, located in 1277 Anthony Hall, provides a quiet space for individual reflection, meditation, and prayer. The ecumenical environment welcomes all and embraces understanding and the furthering of knowledge associated with differing perspectives. We believe the MSU value of inclusion is evident in the unity of spiritual reflection and connection that can occur in this space. The harmony of the MSU community allows us to personify co-existence in the Reflection Room, which is open during regular building hours as posted.

 


Student Governing Groups

Many campus activities are the responsibility of the various student governing groups. These groups include:

 


Associated Students of Michigan State University

Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU). As the all-university undergraduate student governing body, ASMSU provides representation through the General Assembly. The work of ASMSU is conducted through its boards and committees. Offices are maintained in the Student Services Building. The web site is www.asmsu.msu.edu.

The General Assembly (GA) is composed of proportional representation elected from each college and one representative selected by each of the following groups: MSU Student Housing Cooperative, Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, National Panhellenic Council, Independent Greek Council, Jewish Student Union, Residence Halls Association, University Apartments Council of Residents, Arab Cultural Society, Black Student Alliance, Cultural de las Razas, Muslim Student Organization, North American Indigenous Student Organization, Asian Pacific American Student Organization, International Student Association, Alliance of Queer and Ally Student (AQAS), Women’s Council and Student Veterans of America. The GA represents students on relevant issues; provides a forum for discussion of these issues; provides free legal services, bluebooks, printing and copying, and interest free loans; approves appointments of undergraduates to various university committees, provides the free Readership Program and special student services and acts as the official representative for the welfare and rights of undergraduate students. ASMSU also provides a free iClicker, calculator rental program and a safe ride program. 

ASMSU Student Allocations Board provides funding for Registered Student Organizations (RSOs) as well as groups that are part of the Council of Racial and Ethnic Students (CORES) and Council of Progressive Students (COPS). RSOs are eligible to receive up to $4,500 in funding through a reimbursement process once each academic year. Groups can apply for funding for a wide variety of projects, including speakers, conferences and educational programming events.
 


Council of Graduate Students

 The Council of Graduate Students represents all registered Michigan State University graduate and graduate-professional students. COGS is composed of one representative from each degree-granting college and seven officers. COGS exists to promote the academic, social, and economic goals of graduate and graduate-professional students; to establish effective communication among these students, and to create channels of communication with other student organizations and with the academic and administrative units of the University. COGS maintains an office at 120 Chittenden Hall where it provides a copy service and a thesis and dissertation printing service. A loan program, sponsored by COGS, is administered by the Office of Financial Aid. ASMSU/COGS Legal Services provides graduate students a prepaid legal services plan.


Fraternity and Sorority Life

Since 1872, Michigan State University students have had the choice of participating in a nationally affiliated Greek letter organization.  Today, the Fraternity and Sorority Life (FSL) community is comprised of more than 60 internationally affiliated social Greek letter organizations with a combined membership of over 4,500 students.  Greek letter organizations merge almost every segment of the campus community into their chapters-leadership development, community service, athletics, social life, housing, management, and business functions, alumni relations, accountability, and responsibility. Through quality educational experiences, fraternities, and sororities support the guiding principles of the institution, as well as provide an avenue whereby all students experience active learning through self-governance.

The 62 fraternities and sororities are governed by governing councils responsible for representing constituents to the greater campus and East Lansing communities, providing programs and services to chapters and their members, and creating and enforcing standards and policies throughout the Greek community.  Through mutual interdependence, the governing councils assist all 62 member organizations in providing a quality Greek experience for their members. The governing councils include:

  • Interfraternity Council (IFC), governing 31 internationally affiliated men's Greek letter organizations.
  • Panhellenic Council (Panhell), governing 14 National Panhellenic Council Greek letter organizations.
  • National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), governing nine historically.
  • African-American men's and women's Greek letter organizations.
  • Multicultural Greek Council, governing eight multicultural men’s and women’s Greek letter organizations.

Other community-wide organizations that are collaboratively coordinated by the governing councils are Greek Week and the Order of Omega National Greek Leadership Honorary.
For more information on the Greek community, contact Fraternity and Sorority Life, 316 Student Services Building, 1-517-355-8286 or www.greeklife.msu.edu.


 


Student Housing Cooperative

The Student Housing Cooperative (SHC) is the governing group for cooperative living units. Cooperatives are student owned and managed organizations that contribute to the living experiences, social benefits, and economic savings of the members. The SHC meets regularly to discuss problems and coordinate activities of cooperative living and is represented on the ASMSU General Assembly. The primary goal of the SHC is to provide affordable housing for the East Lansing area. Additional purposes and goals are: democratic control, open and voluntary membership, continuous education, improvement of services, and cooperation and communication among cooperatives.

Information about cooperatives is available at the MSU Student Housing Cooperative office, 541 E. Grand River, East Lansing, MI 48823, telephone 1-517-355-8313.

 


University Apartments Council of Residents

The University Apartments Council of Residents (UACOR) is recognized by the university as a governing group with authority to govern the affairs of the residents of MSU Spartan Village Apartments, University Village, and 1855 Place.

UACOR provides activities and services for residents. The group also represent students' views to University Residence Education and Housing Services, and other institutional partners.

The Executive Board, along with Village Representatives, are elected by the general membership. Voting privileges are extended to the aforementioned. Residents are encouraged to participate in monthly Town Meetings and bring their ideas, interests, and concerns to the attention of UACOR. A tax is assessed every semester. For further information contact UACOR at the University Apartments Residence Education office at 1-517-353-9499. The UACOR office is located in Room 138B, Spartan Village Community Center.


Residence Halls Association

Residence Halls Association (RHA) represents the highest level of undergraduate residence hall government and is the governing body for all undergraduate residence halls. Membership is composed of an elected representative from each hall on campus and from:  Black Student Alliance, Cultural de las Razas Unidas, North American Indian Student Organization, Asian Pacific American Student Organization, Alliance of Queer and Ally Students, Women’s Council, Arab Cultural Society, and Council of Students with Disabilities and area-based caucus groups. RHA is recognized as a legitimate part of the university decision-making process and its purposes include developing communication between individual halls and the university community; sponsoring and coordinating all-university activities for students living in residence halls; formulating policy and regulations pertaining to residence halls students; and representing areas of interest and concern to such students. In addition, RHA sponsors workshops, the Campus Center Cinemas, Movie Rental offices, Spartan Leadership Conference, RHA-TV (channels 11 and 12), RHA Karaoke, concerts, and special events. All residents of Michigan State University undergraduate residence halls are members of RHA and may exercise their voting rights and opinions through the representatives of their respective halls. A tax is collected during registration for fall and spring semesters from each undergraduate and graduate student living in a residence hall to support the activities listed above. The fall and spring only tax also supports the functions of each hall government. Contact RHA at: rha@msu.edu.

 


Owen Graduate Association

Owen Graduate Association OGA) represents the interests of Owen Graduate Hall residents and functions as the major governing body for that hall. OGA provides a program of information and services for Owen Graduate Hall residents and participates in the formulation of policies and regulations pertaining to residents of that hall. All residents of Owen Graduate Hall are members of OGA and pay a tax to support the activities of the OGA.

 


Student Publications

Michigan State University's yearbook, The Red Cedar Log, is published by students under the auspices of the Associated Students of Michigan State University. The yearbook is free to MSU students and is supported through the ASMSU student tax. Other student publications include those maintained independently, or within colleges, departments, schools, living units, and student organizations. The State News, a daily newspaper distributed widely to students, faculty, and staff, is published by The State News, Inc. The corporation is separate and independent from the university; however, its staff is composed largely of Michigan State University students.


Impact 89FM, WDMB-FM

The mission statement of Impact 89FM, WDMB-FM, MSU’s student radio station, is Diversity in Programming, Professionalism in Presentation and Education.

Impact 89FM, is an FCC licensed non-commercial educational station that operates 24/7/365 and covers the mid-Michigan area around Lansing. It may also be heard via streaming audio and video at impact89fm.org. WFIX, the training station, streams online at thefix.org. A fee collected from all students each semester supports the stations. Any student, regardless of major, may apply to work at the station, either as a volunteer or in a paid position. Positions range from disk jockey to producers, engineers and marketing. The offices and studios are located in G-4 Holden Hall and are accessible for persons with disabilities. For more information, call, 1-517-884-8900.

 


The Students

Michigan State University's enrollment totals close to 50,000 students including the off-campus programs. Around 39,000 are undergraduates with the remainder in graduate and graduate-professional programs. Over 75 percent of the new undergraduates enter as first-year students from Michigan high schools or as transfer students from the Michigan community-junior colleges or other colleges and universities in the state. These students come from throughout the state and represent the smallest as well as the largest communities. The remaining students enter from high schools, colleges, and universities throughout the United States and the world. During the Fall 2021 semester, over 4,100 international students from 126 countries were enrolled. Approximately 53 percent of the undergraduate and graduate students on the East Lansing campus were women.


Student Rights and Responsibilities


Student Rights and Responsibilities

On March 16, 1967, the Board of Trustees of Michigan State University approved a document entitled Academic Freedom for Students at Michigan State University. The report established guidelines to identify rights and duties of students in regard to conduct, academic pursuits, the keeping of records, and publications. It provided for structures and procedures for the formulation of regulations governing student conduct, for the interpretation and amendment of the guidelines, for due process in the adjudication of student disciplinary cases, and for channeling to the faculty and administration student complaints and concerns in the academic area.

The original document has been amended several times, most recently in 2014 which also included a name change. The document is now entitled Student Rights and Responsibilities. The revised edition incorporating all amendments as approved by the Board of Trustees is included in Spartan Life. Visit http://splife.studentlife.msu.edu.


Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities

On June 18, 1971, the Board of Trustees of Michigan State University approved a document entitled Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities. The document established guidelines to identify rights and duties of graduate students in regard to such matters as academic programming, conduct, support, and the keeping of records. This document provided for structures and procedures for formulating regulations governing student conduct, for amending the document, for considering grievances, and for providing due process in the adjudication of cases involving graduate student rights and responsibilities.

The original document has been subsequently amended. The revised edition incorporating all amendments as approved by the Board of Trustees is included in Spartan Life. Visit http://splife.studentlife.msu.edu/graduate-student-rights-and-responsibilities.


Law Student Rights and Responsibilities

On June 6, 2014, the Board of Trustees of the Law College at Michigan State University approved a document entitled Law Student Rights and Responsibilities. The document established guidelines to identify rights and duties of law students in regard to such matters as academic programming, conduct, support, and the keeping of records. This document provided for structures and procedures for formulating regulations governing student conduct, for amending the document, for considering grievances, and for providing due process in the adjudication of cases involving law student rights and responsibilities.  You may view the document in Spartan Life. Visit http://splife.studentlife.msu.edu/law-students-rights-and-responsibilities.


Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities

On June 6, 1986, the Board of Trustees of Michigan State University approved a document entitled Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities. The document established guidelines to identify rights and duties of medical students in regard to such matters as academic programming, conduct, support, and the keeping of records. This document provided for structures and procedures for formulating regulations governing student conduct, for amending the document, for considering grievances, and for providing due process in the adjudication of cases involving medical student rights and responsibilities. 

This document as amended and as approved by the Board of Trustees is available from the offices of the Deans of the Colleges of Human Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine; the Office of the Graduate School; the Office of the Provost; the Office of the Ombudsperson; and online at Student Life at http://splife.studentlife.msu.edu/medical-student-rights-and-responsibilites-mssr.


Policy on Research with Human Subjects

Student programs may involve human subjects in research and/or clinical investigations. "Research" means a systematic investigation, including research development, testing and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. Masters' theses and Ph.D. dissertations are considered to present generalizable knowledge. "Human subject" means a living individual about whom an investigator conducting research obtains (1) data through intervention or interaction with the individual or (2) identifiable private information or identifiable biospecimens. Investigators can include faculty, staff, students, postdoctoral researchers, trainees, and volunteers, among others. Federal regulations and/or university policies require review and approval of all proposed research and/or clinical investigations involving human subjects by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) or require an exempt determination from the IRB office prior to initiation. An official determination letter from the MSU IRB office must be obtained before involving human subjects in research and/or clinical investigations; this letter may be requested by other University offices.
 
Additional information, including  forms, templates, procedures for online IRB submission and review, and complete definitions, is available from the Human Research Protection Program Web site at www.hrpp.msu.edu, E-mail irb@msu.edu, or call 1-517-355-2180. Questions are welcomed. 


Student Organizations

Student organizations at Michigan State University provide an opportunity for students to participate in leadership experiences and to explore areas of specific interest. Students are encouraged to consider the value of membership in an organized group. Each of the 1,000-plus existing Registered Student Organizations (RSOs) has its own activities and membership requirements. Students who are members of an honorary society may associate with the Michigan State University chapter of that society. 

More detailed information regarding RSOs may be found at involve.msu.edu, obtained from the Spartan Experiences Office, 101 Student Services Building or visit studentlife.msu.edu.

 


Student Services

Michigan State University provides extensive student services and support to assist students in making their educational experiences more engaging and satisfying. While the principal function of the university is to provide a suitable intellectual environment for students through classrooms, laboratories and stimulating members of the faculty, it is recognized that the total development of the individual – personal, social and physical, as well as intellectual – is of equal importance and that learning occurs in many venues.

 


Academic Student Affairs Offices in the Colleges

Each college, through its dean or an associate dean, maintains an office in charge of academic affairs of students in the college. These offices assist their students in academic matters, such as exploration and goal setting, enrollment, changes of major program, academic advisement, and withdrawal and readmission procedures.


Student Health Insurance

Michigan State University partners with  Blue Care Network (BCN) to provide health insurance options for students, graduate assistants and eligible dependents. When enrolled in the plan, students and graduate assistants are assigned a primary care physician, or PCP, who’s based at Olin Health Care Center on campus. More information can be found at www.bcbsm.com/msu.

For further information on student insurance and how to enroll, contact MSU Human Resources at 1407 South Harrison Road, East Lansing, MI 48823, 1-517-353-4434, SolutionsCenter@hr.msu.edu, or visit https://hr.msu.edu/benefits/students/
 


Graduate Assistants

Students on a graduate assistantship will be automatically enrolled in the insurance plan as a benefit offered by Michigan State University. Eligible spouses and dependents of graduate assistants can be enrolled on a voluntary basis and are partially funded by MSU.

 


International Students

Most international students who are not on a graduate assistantship are required to purchase the Michigan State University health plan.  The charge for health insurance premium will be included on the Registration Billing Statement and the student will be automatically enrolled. A limited number of eligible international students who can demonstrate active coverage under other insurance that meets the applicable waiver criteria, may apply for a waiver.

 


Human, Osteopathic, and Veterinary Medical Students

All medical students in the Colleges of Human, Osteopathic, and Veterinary Medicine are required to purchase the Michigan State University plan or submit proof of other comparable health insurance. The charge for insurance premiums will be included on the Registration Billing Statement.

 


All Other Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Students meeting the eligibility requirements may enroll on a voluntary basis. This includes undergraduate and graduate students who are in a degree program or completing certification.

 


Student Health Services at Olin Health Center and the Neighborhoods

As part of the Student Health and Wellness unit, Student Health Services provides outpatient medical services for Michigan State University students, MSU Law students and their spouse/domestic partner. Open year-round, Olin Health Center is the primary Student Health Services location on campus. Medical services include primary care, gynecologic services, laboratory, physical therapy, radiology, allergy therapy, immunizations, and STI testing. Parking is available in the adjacent parking ramp. Neighborhood clinics are typically open in fall and spring semesters and offer primary care services, as well as treatment for minor illness or injury. Neighborhood clinic hours vary by location. The Phone Information Nurse is available for health-related questions 24 hours per day.
 
MSU Student Health Services is staffed with board-certified physicians and certified healthcare professionals. The university covers the cost of the first three medical office visits each year for students enrolled in MSU classes (this does not apply to MSU Law students). There will be a bill for the fourth and subsequent visits, as well as for other services. Charges for students with health insurance will be billed directly to the student’s insurance company.
 
Health insurance coverage is recommended. Information about the Student Insurance plan is available through the Michigan State University Benefits Office at 1-800-353-4434. Email solutionscenter@hr.msu.edu or visit hr.msu.edu/benefits/students for more information.
 
The Michigan State University student or spouse identification card and insurance information should be presented when service is requested. For information about Student Health Services, including appointments, office hours, services and charges, visit olin.msu.edu or email olin@msu.edu.

See all Student Health and Wellness services at studenthealth.msu.edu.

 


Health Promotion

As part of the Student Health and Wellness unit, the Health Promotion department provides a variety of programs, presentations and health information to help students achieve academic success by supporting their well-being. Services include: 

  • Nutrition and body image education with a registered dietitian nutritionist
  • SPARTANfit Fitness and Wellness Program, including comprehensive fitness assessments and wellness coaching
  • Sexual wellness education and sexual health resources
  • Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) education and support 
  • The Collegiate Recovery Community and Recovery Housing for students in recovery from alcohol or drug use 
Most Health Promotion services are available free to MSU students. The department also regularly collects and shares health-related data and information about Spartan health trends.

The main Health Promotion office is located at 345 Student Services Building. Visit healthpromotion.msu.edu or call 1-517-353-0718 for more information.
 

Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities

Michigan State University values and promotes participation by people with disabilities in all aspects of campus life.  The Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities (RCPD) is available to faculty, staff and students to foster understanding of the opportunities and responsibilities under disability-related legislation.

Registration with the RCPD is essential for students and employees with disabilities in order to facilitate timely and effective assistance.  Staff at the RCPD are ready with information, resources, and guidance for the campus community in support of full inclusion.

Visit www.rcpd.msu.edu.  The RCPD is located at 120 Bessey Hall, 1-517-884-7273 (4-RCPD). 


Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS)

CAPS offers registered MSU students assistance for a wide range of concerns, like depression, anxiety, homesickness, issues with adjustment, acculturation, relationships, racial identity and LBGTQ concerns, trauma, eating or body image, and other personal mental health issues. Resources are available on the CAPS website for parents, faculty, staff, friends and others looking to provide support for a loved one. CAPS has a diverse staff engaged in multicultural and collaborative approaches to provide quality care.

Confidential, no-charge counseling services include:

  • Initial screenings to connect each student to the most appropriate level of care and other on- or -off campus resources
  • Individual, group and relationship counseling
  • Intensive clinical services
  • Support with clinical coordination and referral
  • CAPS Connect (free 10- to 15-minute confidential consultations)
Psychiatric services are free for the first three lifetime visits for registered students; the fourth and subsequent visits are billed to insurance (patients concerned about potential cost should mention this to their provider). 

The CAPS Crisis Line, 1-517-355-8270, is available 24/7 (press 1 at the prompt).

To learn more about CAPS, visit caps.msu.edu.
 


 


Center for Survivors

The Center for Survivors works with sexual assault survivors and others affected by sexual violence. They provide free and confidential individual counseling, advocacy, and support groups to MSU students and the community. Trained volunteers are also ready to provide support, crisis intervention, and connection to local resources through crisis hotline and crisis chat services. A 24/7 crisis hotline is available at 1-517-372-6666. 

The Sexual Assault Healthcare Program is available for adults who have been sexually assaulted within the past five days. The program — staffed 24/7 by specialized forensic nurses — includes free post-assault care services, like sexual assault kits, prophylactic medication and more. The program is located in suite 237 of the Student Services building (556 East Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824). Designated parking is available on Farm Lane. Patients can use the east entrance buzzer to be let into the building. Call 1-517-353-2700 to learn more. 

For more information — or to access crisis chat services — visit centerforsurvivors.msu.edu. Call 1-517-355-3551 to schedule an appointment with a counselor or advocate.


 


Other Services


Career Services Network

The Career Services Network assists students with career exploration, decision-making, and job search strategies and provides career advising, interest assessments, workshops and networking resources throughout its many locations.  In addition, the Network offers opportunities to connect directly with employers for full-time jobs and internships through career fairs, on-campus interviews, company visits and networking events.  Students may access most services, including postings for part-time, internship, and entry-level jobs, using the Handshake system. For more information, visit www.careernetwork.msu.edu or contact us at careerservices@csp.msu.edu or 1-517-355-9510.


Student Parent Resource Center

The Student Parent Resource Center (SPRC) coordinates information, resources, and University initiatives to support student-parents managing academics and family life. Students may contact the SPRC coordinator at 1-517-432-3745 or steedkim@msu.edu for information about programs and services, including child care, emergency backup child care, sick child care, student parent support, financial assistance, campus and community involvement opportunities, and other resource referrals. 

 


Early Childhood Units

Two early childhood centers are available to the children of Michigan State University students and faculty. The Michigan State University Child Development Laboratories has two locations, one in East Lansing at 325 W. Grand River Avenue offering full day care for children ages birth through 5 years, and a second site in Haslett at the Wilkshire Early Childhood Center offering half day programming, Monday through Thursday.  These two programs are administered by the Department of Human Development and Family Studies in the College of Social Science.


MSU Safe Place

MSU Safe Place provides advocacy, shelter, counseling, support groups, safety planning, information and referrals to survivors of relationship violence and stalking. Educational scholarships are available to currently enrolled MSU students whose academic pursuits have been affected by intimate partner violence. All support services are free and confidential. MSU Safe Place serves students, faculty, staff, and their partners. We serve non-MSU affiliated community members when shelter space and staffing levels allow. We also provide consultation for anyone seeking to support the survivors in their lives. Volunteer and internship opportunities are available. For more information, call 1-517-355-1100, email noabuse@msu.edu, or visit safeplace.msu.edu.


University Ombudsperson

The University Ombudsperson is an independent, neutral, informal and independent resource where students may discuss concerns related to the university, as well understand their rights and responsibilities. Visit https://ombud.msu.edu/. Phone 1-517- 353-8830 or e-mail ombud@msu.edu.


Department of Police and Public Safety

The MSU Police Department serves the community by providing a safe environment for students, faculty, staff, and visitors to live, learn, and work. Services include police patrol, responding to calls for service, criminal investigations, special event security, emergency management, access control, and parking services. Visit www.police.msu.edu for more information.
 


Office of Supportive Services

The Office of Supportive Services is a multifaceted, holistic, academic support unit that provides services for students who are first-generation, low income, and/or meet other participant criteria to be part of the TRIO Student Support Services Program. Visit www.oss.msu.edu, oss@msu.edu, or 1-517-353-5210.
 


Transportation Services on Campus


CATA Bus Service

The campus bus service is provided by the Capital Area Transportation Authority (CATA). CATA operates fixed routes, serving all university apartments, residence halls, commuter lots, and the main campus 24/7 during fall and spring semesters.  Most campus routes do not operate during university breaks or on university-recognized holidays.  Additionally, CATA provides direct service to off-campus apartments in East Lansing, Lansing, Lansing Township, Okemos, and Haslett areas year-round as well as many other destinations in the Greater Lansing area. You can learn about fares, tips for new riders and view the CATA service area online.  Visit www.cata.org for personal trip itineraries, comprehensive service information and online pass sales.

Weekday Campus Regular Fixed-Route Service - Six routes serve campus Monday-Friday starting at 7:00 a.m. during fall and spring semesters. Service runs until 2:30 a.m. on Route 30-South and East Neighborhoods, Route 31-Brody and East Neighborhoods and Route 39-University Village. Route 38-Spartan Village concludes at 10:45 p.m. Service on Route 33-Union/South Neighborhood ends at 10:30 p.m. Route 32 Commuter Lot/Auditorium/Clinical Center serves campus until 7:00 p.m.

Evening and Late-Night Campus Service Seven Days a Week - CATA offers two curb-to-curb demand-response services within the campus boundaries during fall and spring semester, excluding university breaks and university-recognized holidays. You can call 1-517-432-8888 or 2-8888 from any campus phone to request a ride.  With either service, the bus arrives within 20 minutes of your call.

Lot Link operates from 7:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. weekdays and 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. on weekends.  Buses travel between parking lots (#80, #83, #89, and #91). Rides must start or end at one of the four lots. Service is also available to/from Spartan Village Monday - Friday during regular service hours. 

The Night Owl operates from 2:00 a.m. until 7:00 a.m. weekdays (until 9:00 a.m. on weekends). You can also use campus green light phones, located throughout campus, to call for Night Owl service.  Passengers may travel between any two locations on campus. Residents of 1855 Place, University and Spartan Village Apartments may also use The Night Owl when traveling to or from any campus location during these hours. 

Weekend Campus Service - CATA’s weekend service operates from approximately 9:00 a.m. until 2:30 a.m. during fall and spring semesters, excluding university breaks and university-recognized holidays. Weekend service is provided on Routes #34, #35, and #36.

Free-Fare Campus Fixed-Rate Service - Students, faculty and staff ride for free on all campus fixed routes (Routes 30-39) during fall and spring semesters. Note a fare is required when riding LotLink, Night Owl, or any off-campus routes. See below.

Fares and Passes For LotLink, Night Owl and Off-Campus Routes - The student cash fare is 60¢. Cash fare customers must show  the bus driver a valid Michigan State University Student ID to qualify for the 60¢ fare. Customers not showing the Michigan State University Student ID will pay the regular fare of $1.25. Free transfers are available on all off-campus CATA fixed-route buses.

Students may also purchase a CATA 31-Day Student Pass for $18 or a Semester Pass for $50.  These two passes are good on LotLink, Night Owl and for all CATA fixed-route transportation services off-campus. Passes are sold online at www.cata.org, the MSU ID Office, and many convenient off-campus locations. A lost or stolen Semester Pass may be replaced if the original pass was linked the student’s ID when purchased. Students are allowed one replacement pass free of charge per semester. Contact the MSU ID Office in Room 170 of the International Center for a replacement. 

The regular fare for non-student faculty and staff is $1.25 on any off-campus route.  A 31-Day Adult Pass is available for $35.

Paratransit  Service - (Service for Persons with Disabilities) - Spec-Tran is a CATA curb-to-curb service for persons with disabilities who are unable to use CATA fixed-route service. Spec-Tran customers must be certified to be eligible to use this service.  MSU customers must contact the MSU Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities (RCPD) 1-517-884-RCPD (4-7273) TTY: 1-517-355-1293 to apply for certification. Spec-Tran ride reservations must be made by 5:00 p.m. the day before a trip is to occur. Rides can be scheduled up to 14 days in advance. Eligible students may obtain free Michigan State University Spec-Tran passes for trips that originate and end on campus by contacting the RCPD office. To schedule a ride, call 1-517-432-8888 or 2-8888 from any campus phone between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. daily.

CATA Information and Assistance - Visit CATA’s Web site at www.cata.org for online chat assistance, a personalized trip itinerary or online bus pass purchases, service and fare information, updates on route detours and service changes, etc.  CATA’s Customer Information Center can provide trip-planning assistance in person, by phone or e-mail. Representatives are available to talk, Monday - Friday from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Call 1-517-394-1000 or 2-CATA (2-2282) from any campus phone for assistance, or e-mail info@cata.org. CATANOW provides next-bus real-time departures by texting your bus stop number to 76123. Printed bus schedules are available in most residence halls and at other key campus locations. The ADD line is the Michigan Relay Center Voice - 1-800-649-3777. Large-print versions and MP3 files (downloadable at www.cata.org) of all CATA schedules are available for persons with visual impairments. CATA's bus-hailing kits are designed for use at bus stops served by more than one route. The kit allows visually impaired riders to signal the number of their route to operators of approaching buses. Contact CATA Customer Experience at 1-517-394-1000 to request these materials. You can also follow CATA on Facebook.com/rideCATA and Twitter.com/rideCATA.

Transit App - Transit is CATA’s preferred mobile app for real-time bus departures, bus tracking and comprehensive trip planning options. The free app is available on iPhone and Android devices.

MSU/CATA TRANSPORTATION  CENTER (MSU-CTC) - This indoor facility is the main boarding center for CATA bus routes serving campus. It is located on the ground level of the Shaw Ramp (Ramp 1), between North and South Shaw lanes, just east of the  MSU Planetarium.  Amenities include phone access to CATA Customer Experience and ride-request phone lines, print maps and timetables, direct access to the Shaw Ramp (Ramp 1), comfortable indoor seating areas, a community policing office, ATM, vending machines and restrooms. The facility is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  Those who drive to campus and park in the Shaw Ramp (Ramp 1) can access the MSU-CTC on its ground floor to board a CATA bus for a convenient intermodal commute.


 


Bicycles

MSU Ordinances require any bicycle possessed or operated on campus be registered. Bikes must be in operable condition, and when parked they must be locked at a bike rack, otherwise they may be impounded and fees assessed for retrieval.  Michigan State University, City of Lansing, City of East Lansing, Lansing Township, and Meridian Township bike permits are acceptable.  Permits must be current, valid, and attached to the bicycle frame’s post below the seat, facing the handlebars. Failure to properly display and/or affix the permit may result in bicycle impoundment. Visit www.police.msu.edu to register your bike (make, color, and serial number must be provided upon registration). Bike registration is complementary. All CATA full sized buses are equipped with bike racks. Each rack accommodates several bikes.


Motor Vehicles, Mopeds, and Electric Mobility Devices

All students whether residing on or off campus must register their vehicle with the MSU Police Department if they operate their vehicles on campus. In addition, mopeds and electric mobility devices such as electric scooters or electric bicycles operated on campus must be registered with the MSU Police Department.  Failure to do so may result in parking violations and impoundment. Visit www.police.msu.edu for more information.