Academic Programs Catalog

Undergraduate Education


Undergraduate Education


Admission

An undergraduate student at Michigan State University may choose a major field of study from among more than 150 programs. To earn a bachelor's degree, students must complete requirements prescribed by the university, their colleges, and their departments. Careful planning of selectives and choice of electives permit design of a program of study around the student's particular interests and abilities.

In recent years, many students entering the university as first-time freshmen have taken more than four years to complete the requirements for the bachelor's degree. This is a national trend in all universities and has many causes.

A list of the colleges, schools, and departments of instruction, the programs and areas of study, the degrees offered, and the course designations are shown in The Academic Program section of this catalog. Some instructional units do not have programs which lead to degrees for undergraduates, but offer courses, e.g., Aerospace Studies, Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Military Science, and Pharmacology and Toxicology.

Information relating to enrollment, payment of fees, credits, changes in enrollment, the grading system, facilities, and other general information is given in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section of this catalog.


Student Computer Policy

All undergraduate students at Michigan State University are required to have a computer that can connect to the Internet using a high speed connection.

All students should check with their prospective major college and department to determine if their program has specific computer requirements for their academic programs. Some programs require all of their students to have a laptop computer. Others strongly recommend using particular computer operating systems.

If there are no specific computer requirements for the student’s program of study, then the computer may be either a desktop or a laptop. The student’s computer may be any brand running any operating system. Students will want to be sure the computer will run the applications software, e.g., office applications, they will use for their courses.  The computer must be able to connect directly to Michigan State University's campus network and the Internet using a high-speed Ethernet connection. MSU does not recommend students rely on tablet devices, mobile phones, or netbook computers as their primary computer due to software limitations.

If a laptop computer is chosen, students should consider having a machine that is equipped to access both the wored and wireless MSU networks. The Michigan State University wireless network supports all current wireless communication protocols (i.e., 802.11a, g, and n. The 802.11n standard operates in both the 2.4 and 5 GHz frequencies.)

It is crucially important that all computers be equipped with virus protection and firewall software, and that the software be installed and running prior to connecting a computer to the Michigan State University network. All students that utilize mSU resources such as network, campus labs, etc., are expected to abide by the MSU Acceptable Use Policy, found at https://tech.msu.edu/about/guidelines-policies/aup/.

Some course sections may be taught with the expectation that students use laptop computers in class. For each section, this is noted in the Schedule of Courses. Therefore, a laptop may provide expanded instructional opportunities for students.

Costs related to this requirement will be included in the calculation of financial aid eligibility for need-based aid or federal or private loans.

For the latest information on Michigan State University computing services, hardware, and software, visit www.tech.msu.edu.

 


Undergraduate Admission to the University


Admission Application Deadlines

Regular Applicants. The application deadline for undergraduate applications is normally 30 days before the beginning of the semester; however, the deadline is subject to earlier closing without notice, especially for fall semester. In recent years, the number of qualified freshman applicants has exceeded available spaces. Those persons who qualify for admission after having completed the eleventh grade fill the freshman class initially. For fullest consideration, apply as early as possible during the senior year of high school.

If a person submits an application for admission to an undergraduate program at Michigan State University for a specific semester, and is accepted but does not enroll for that semester, the application may be reactivated within a period of one year subject to the deadline for filing applications for admission and a new application review will be conducted.  If, after one year, the person still has not enrolled at Michigan State, a new application for admission must be submitted.

 


Application Procedure for High School Seniors

Admission to Michigan State University is open to all candidates on the basis of academic preparation and ability, and the availability of space in the desired academic program, and without regard to race, color, gender, gender identity, religion, national origin, political persuasion, sexual orientation, marital status, disability, height, weight, veteran status, age, or (in the case of U.S. citizens) financial need.

If you are a high school senior applying for entrance as a freshman, you should:

  1. Apply online at www.admissions.msu.edu
    1. Complete the online application including your personal statement.  The application fee is required at the time you submit the online application.  Payment must be made using Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or American Express, or by using an online check. Refer to Costs in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section of this catalog. Application fee waivers are available online or from your high school for eligible students. International applicants are not eligible for application fee waivers.
    2. Submit your personal statement electronically in your application for admission. You should only answer one question.
    3. Have your ACT or SAT scores sent to Michigan State University by the testing agency. The ACT code is 2032; the SAT code is 1465. You are required to submit the writing portion of either examination.

 


Application Procedure for Transfer Students

If you have had some college-level work after high school graduation and are applying as a transfer student, you should:

  1. Apply online at www.admissions.msu.edu.
    1. Complete the online application including your personal statement.  The application fee is required at the time you submit the online application.  Payment must be made using Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or American Express, or by using an online check. Refer to Costs in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section of this catalog. Application fee waivers are available online for eligible students. International applicants are not eligible for application fee waivers.
    2. After your application is received and entities attended verified, you will be asked to self-report your academic record for all U.S. institutions of higher education for admission consideration. Do not self-report course work for international institutions. Sealed official paper transcripts from all international institutions must be submitted.
      1. Upon admission, all transfer students are required to provide current, official transcripts from all institutions attended.
      2. Applicants who have accumulated fewer than 28 transferable credits must also submit an official high school transcript and standardized test scores.
         

Freshman Admission

A high school student planning to apply as a freshman should submit an application as soon as possible at the beginning of the senior year. There are many advantages to applying early. For example, some programs are filled on a first-admitted basis. Students interested in being considered for merit scholarships should apply by November 1, and all students are strongly encouraged to apply by January 1. Students should apply using the online application available at www.admissions.msu.edu.

The university requires students to have a high school diploma or equivalent. Students must submit official transcripts from all high schools attended, proof of GED (if applicable), a personal statement, and official ACT or SAT scores.

The university seeks to admit students who provide evidence of intellectual performance, good character, and potential, which will permit them to profit from programs of the academic rigor of those offered by Michigan State University. The admission decision takes into account all available academic data, including grades, test scores, caliber of high school program and principal and counselor comments. The university may consider non-academic factors in its admission decisions, including information it receives on an applicant’s leadership qualities, exceptional talents, conduct and community involvement record. Typically, the most important element in the admissions process is high school academic achievement. Each application receives individual attention. Applicants who are admissible will be granted admission pending confirmation of satisfactory status with regard to final grades and other admission criteria.

Priority is given to applicants who have strong high school records supported by comparable test scores. The chief academic officer of the university has authority to grant waivers of usual entrance requirements.

Admission to the university is conditioned upon the applicant providing accurate and current admissions information and upon the applicant updating such data if circumstances arise that make the previously provided information inaccurate, misleading or incomplete in an important way. Submission of an application authorizes the university to investigate the accuracy of statements made and data provided by the applicant and those who submit materials or information on behalf of the applicant. Falsifications, misrepresentations or omissions in application answers or supporting data may constitute grounds to deny or revoke admission to the university. Admission to the university may be denied or revoked if the university learns that an individual has engaged in conduct that indicates to the university that the individual is not ready to be a responsible member of the university community.

The university encourages all applicants to visit the East Lansing campus. Admissions presentations and campus tours are available Monday-Friday throughout the year and on select Saturdays during fall and spring. There is no charge, but pre-registration is required. For more information, please visit www.admissions.msu.edu/visit.


Examinations

Michigan State University requires scores from either the ACT or the SAT for every domestic freshman applicant. Freshman applicants are recommended to take the writing portion of either the ACT or the SAT. SAT II exams are not required by Michigan State University.

Scores should be sent to MSU directly from the testing agency. MSU's ACT code is 2032; MSU's SAT code is 1465. Information on the ACT is available at www.act.org and on the SAT at www.collegeboard.com.


High School Requirements

Entrance Requirements:  Michigan State University continues to support a multifaceted approach to admissions where factors such as grades, test scores, talent and experience are considered along with a critical component of specific course requirements. MSU recognizes that there will be students who have potential for academic success at Michigan State University, but who have not precisely met the high school course requirements, e.g., high-achieving students, students whose high schools do not offer all of the appropriate courses, non–traditional students, and international students. The absence of any particular component of high school course work should not be an insurmountable barrier to admission. Michigan State University urges all interested individuals to apply for admission.

High School Curricular Requirements:  Michigan State University recognizes that adequate preparation for collegiate level programs demands comprehensive work in the academic subject matter areas and substantial training in writing. High school course work requirements provide the foundation on which university work is built by providing basic competencies in the following areas.

English:  Four (4) years of college preparatory composition and literature courses. The ability to comprehend what is being read and to read critically is fundamental for success in college. A student must come to college with the basic ability to recognize assumptions, to identify intentions, to acknowledge the various forms of literary expressions, and to understand and react to the author's message. It is expected that a high school student is familiar with a wide range of literature representing all literary forms and drawn from a variety of cultures.

Clarity of expression is also important. College programs typically require the ability to organize, present and evaluate information and concepts in written form. A student must be able to use the conventions of written English to convey ideas in an effective and efficient manner. The successful student will be able to write analytically and critically, to construct arguments, and to see relationships between content and form, while reorganizing, revising, and refining to achieve a logical sequence of ideas leading to a conclusion.

Mathematics:  Three (3) years of college preparatory mathematics, including two years of algebra and one year of geometry.  College bound students must understand the language, notation and deductive nature of mathematics and be able to express quantitative ideas with precision. They must have skill in such basics as the solution of equations and inequalities, and the simplification of algebraic expressions. Students who take less than four years of mathematics in high school, or who do not take mathematics in their senior year, often find it necessary to make up a deficiency prior to beginning work in their major area of concentration.  Students are strongly advised to pursue mathematics courses beyond the three–year minimum required for admission. In particular, it is recommended that a calculus preparatory course be included.

Biological and Physical Sciences. Two (2) years of college preparatory science courses from the areas of biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science. As science and technology become increasingly important in everyday life, college bound students, in particular, need an understanding of fundamental scientific concepts. They must know enough about laboratory and field work to ask appropriate scientific questions and to recognize experimental approaches to the solution of such questions. They should understand in some depth scientific concepts and should have some experience in laboratory methods. Additional science courses are highly recommended, particularly if a student is considering a scientific or technical field of study.

History and the Social Sciences:  Three (3) years of college preparatory work in history and the social sciences with at least one year of history and one year of social sciences (from such areas as anthropology, economics, geography, government, political science, psychology or sociology). Through their study of history, college-bound high school students should be able to recognize historical trends and relationships. Students should understand the interactions among peoples of different civilizations, races, and cultures, and know the chronology of major historical events or periods and social movements. It is equally important to understand the underlying political, economic, social, or psychological forces that shape those events. Students should have basic factual knowledge of major social, political and economic institutions within their historical context, as well as introductory knowledge of the content and concepts of the social sciences. A course which shows how the scientific method can be utilized in the social sciences to examine major issues and to address problems will be particularly useful.

Foreign Languages: Two years of college preparatory work in a single foreign language. Students intending to major in areas that require foreign language are encouraged to complete additional work.

Additional Recommended Course Work:  The courses noted above constitute minimum preparation for degree programs in the university. To enhance your application for admission and further prepare for academic success at Michigan State University, a minimum of five additional academic college preparatory courses is recommended.

 


Advanced Payments and Deposits

Refer to Costs in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section of this catalog for information.

 


Office of Supportive Services

The Office of Supportive Services (OSS), located in Room 209 Bessey Hall, is an academic support unit specifically designed for TRIO students and other MSU students, who, feel the need for additional support to prepare for the rigorous demands of higher education.

OSS assists students in developing their abilities and skills and in planning realistic objectives and goals. Special services designed to facilitate the development of coping and self–management skills in students are available. OSS services include academic advising, tutorial assistance, academic skill enrichment workshops, social counseling, career exploration, peer counseling, graduate study planning, and orientation programs.

Students are encouraged to utilize the intensive services regularly until they have established satisfactory academic progress and have made the necessary adjustments to the rigorous demands of the University.

 


Opportunities for High-Achieving Students

Michigan State University recognizes the educational value of a number of pre-matriculation programs by granting academic credit, waiving requirements, and/or placing students in advanced courses. Please refer to the listed online guides for current information. Other special opportunities for high-achieving students are described in the Scholastic Honors section.

 


Advanced Placement Program

Credit or advanced standing may be granted to students who have earned specific scores on College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations.

Equivalencies for waivers or Michigan State University course credit are available at www.admissions.msu.edu/documents/MSU_AP_Equivalencies.pdf. Students must have their AP scores sent directly to the Office of Admissions.

Students who wish to request removal of Advanced Placement credit from their academic record, need to submit their request to their advisor before the end of the first term of enrollment. After the first term of enrollment, the associate dean of the student’s college will review each case, including its accordance with federal financial aid policy, and  may recommend the addition or the removal of Advanced Placement credit by submitting a request to the Office of the Registrar. 


College-Level Examination Program

The College Board has examinations designed to assess competence usually attained by taking beginning college-level courses. Individuals desiring recognition of CLEP examinations for credit at Michigan State University must present official CLEP Examination reports for all exams taken.

CLEP equivalencies are available at www.admissions.msu.edu/documents/MSU_CLEP_Equivalencies.pdf.

 


Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support - Subject Standardized Tests

Prometric has examinations designed to assess competence usually attained by taking college-level courses. Individuals desiring recognition of DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST) examinations for credit at Michigan State University must present an official DSST Transcript for all exams taken.

DANTES equivalencies are available at http://admissions.msu.edu/documents/MSU_DANTES.pdf.


International Baccalaureate Program

Michigan State University accepts the results of the International Baccalaureate Examinations for placement and course credit.

International Baccalaureate (IB) equivalencies are available at www.admissions.msu.edu/documents/MSU_IB_Equivalencies.pdf.



Opportunities for High-Achieving High School Students

Michigan State University offers programs for high-achieving high school students to take courses at Michigan State University and earn college credit while pursuing their high school programs. Credits earned in the High Achieving High School status may be applied to a Michigan State University undergraduate degree. For additional information on course applicability see the Dual Enrollment by High School Students section of this catalog. Details and admissions requirements for High Achieving High School programs are available at www.gifted.msu.edu.

A student must complete the Application for Admission for High Achieving High School Student, submit the high school transcript, and be recommended by the high school counselor or principal. Permission to enroll under the High-Achieving High School Students enrollment status is determined by the following criteria: (a) courses in which enrollment is desired represent advanced study for that student at a level not offered by the high school and are approved by the high school counselor/principal and representative of Michigan State University's Honors College as compatible with that student's academic program and qualifications. Performance in these courses will be monitored as a condition of continued high-achiever status; and (b) enrollment of a student as a high achiever does not assure regular admission to Michigan State University upon completion of high school graduation requirements.

Students who enroll in a course are charged lifelong education course fees and receive Michigan State University credit for each course successfully completed. Students who enroll in courses in the semester immediately preceding matriculation as a degree candidate will be charged regular undergraduate tuition and fees for those courses. Students are subject to all university rules and regulations which apply to regularly enrolled students.  Coordination of high school class schedules with enrollment at Michigan State University, transportation arrangements to and from the university, and parental approval for participation are the responsibility of the student and the high school.

Students enrolled under the High-Achieving High School Students enrollment status who wish to be admitted as undergraduate candidates must make regular application for their desired degree programs with the Office of Admissions in accordance with established application deadlines. Application information may be found at www.admissions.msu.edu.

 


Dual Enrollment by High School Students

Effective for freshmen entering Fall 2013.
High school students who dually enroll for courses at accredited institutions of higher education may receive credit for work taken at these institutions for courses that have been recognized for transfer to Michigan State University in accordance with the University’s transfer credit policy. For information on transfer courses and credits, visit:
http://www.reg.msu.edu/AcademicPrograms/Print.aspx?Section=505

Transfer Student Admission

A transfer student is a student who has attended any post-secondary institution after high school graduation, with the exception of the summer immediately following high school graduation.

Submission of an application authorizes the university to investigate the accuracy of statements made and data provided by the applicant and those who submit materials or information on behalf of the applicant. Admission to the university is conditioned upon the applicant’s providing accurate and current admissions information.  Any changes to the admissions information provided including courses taken or in process and grades received, prior to matriculation to the university must be reported to the Office of Admissions.  If circumstances develop that make previously provided information inaccurate, misleading or incomplete, if not corrected the consequence of the discrepancy may lead to the revocation of an offer of admission or dismissal from the university. Additionally, admission to the university may be denied or revoked if the university learns that an individual has engaged in conduct that indicates to the university that the individual is not ready to be a responsible member of the university community.

Prior to application review, transfer applicants are required to self-report their academic records – including courses currently in progress and future course work:
  • For domestic institutions, students should input courses and grades (where earned) via their online student portal.
  • For international institutions, students should request that all international institutions attended, or examination boards, send original or attested copies of all transcripts, diplomas, mark sheets, and certificates directly to Michigan State University, Office of Admissions, in an official, sealed envelope. In addition, where the original documents are not issued in English, also provide an official English translation of each document.
Upon admission, all transfer students are required to provide current, official transcripts from all institutions attended.

Applicants who have accumulated fewer than 28 transferable credits must also submit an official high school transcript and standardized test scores. Acceptance is determined by the applicant's previous academic record and his or her proposed program. All transfer applicants should demonstrate consistent high-quality academic performance. An international student must present an academic record equal to a minimum cumulative grade–point average of "B" (3.0) or better. The chief academic officer of the university has authority to grant waivers of usual entrance requirements.

Students admitted from institutions whose entrance requirements, programs, and grading systems are equivalent to those of Michigan State University may receive full credit for their past work. See Credits in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog. Students must take such courses in their programs that have not been covered by equivalent work. Only grades of 2.0 and above are eligible for transfer credit. Credits in which grades were earned of any designation less than "C" (2.0), such as C minus (less than 2.0), are not acceptable in transfer. Grades that are less than 2.0 are not accepted in transfer to Michigan State University regardless of a student's overall GPA.

All transferable course work and acceptable credit earned from external examinations are evaluated and posted chronologically. The maximum number of credits from a two-year institution which may be applied toward a Michigan State University degree is 60 semester credits. Though all courses from two-year institutions will be evaluated and transferable courses posted on the student's record, no credits will be accepted towards graduation once 60 total credits are accumulated chronologically.

The university strongly urges students to complete courses that satisfy the Integrative Studies, Mathematics, and Tier I writing requirements and prerequisites to courses for limited enrollment majors upon advice of your advisor.  Students are strongly recommended to complete course work for the following areas at least one full semester (16 weeks) before the desired term of enrollment:
  • An equivalent to MSU WRA 101 or WRA 195H
  • An equivalent to MSU MTH 103, 110, 116, 124, 132 or higher course
Selected correspondence and extension work up to 30 credits may be applied toward a Michigan State University degree, provided the credit is earned at an institution recognized by Michigan State University. The university will grant credit for certain college–level U.S. Armed Forces Institute courses which are recommended by the American Council on Education. Credits are not granted for achievement on the General Educational Development tests.

Transfer credits accepted from another institution are included on the Michigan State University transcript as part of the student’s total credit hours earned. Only course work completed at this University, including Michigan State University Study Abroad Programs or Michigan State University Co-Sponsored Study Abroad Programs, is included in the Michigan State University grade–point average and appears on the Michigan State University transcript. To be eligible for graduation with honor, transfer students must earn a minimum of 50 semester credits at Michigan State University. For the “honor” to be listed in the commencement program, the 50 credits must be earned by the end of the semester prior to graduation.

Students intending to transfer to Michigan State University should consult the transfer equivalency database (Transfer MSU) for their institution at www.transfer.msu.edu.

Students requesting transfer credit of coursework from a higher-learning institution in China should consult Transfer Courses and Credits in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section of this catalog at https://www.reg.msu.edu/AcademicPrograms/Text.aspx?Section=112#s505.

Credits

Courses at Michigan State University are given on a "semester" basis, and credits earned are semester credits. To convert semester credits to the “quarter” systems employed in certain other institutions, multiply by 3/2. To convert quarter credits to semester credits, multiply by 2/3.


Integrative Studies, Mathematics, and Writing Requirements

Transfer students are expected to meet Michigan State University’s Integrative Studies, Mathematics, and Tier I Writing requirements which are similar but not identical to general education requirements at other institutions, either by completing appropriate Michigan State University courses or by transferring courses and credits which are evaluated as acceptable equivalents for Michigan State University courses.  Michigan State University is a member institution of the Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (MACRAO) and a participant in the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA).  For further information regarding the MTA, please visit the MACRAO Web site, www.macrao.org.

During the early stage of their academic work, students who anticipatetransferring to Michigan State University should consult the Office of Admissions Web site, www.admissions.msu.edu/transfer.asp.

 


Evaluation of Credits for Transfer Students for Michigan State University Integrative Studies, Mathematics, and Tier I Writing Courses

Information on courses that will fulfill Michigan State University General Education requirements is found on the Office of Admissions Transfer Guide Web site at https://admissions.msu.edu/apply/transfer/before-you-apply/admission-standards.aspx.

Courses from postsecondary accredited institutions of comparable academic quality considered as acceptable equivalents that may be used by transfer students for MSU Integrative Studies, Mathematics, and Tier I Writing courses include:

  1. Tier I Writing, (4 credits)
    This requirement is satisfied with completion of a course (or combination of courses) equivalent to MSU WRA 101 or 195H.
  2. Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences, (8 credits)
    May be satisfied by completion of a combination of one biological science and one physical science course, and 2 credits of equivalent laboratory course work. A number of science-based programs require alternate tracks with specified disciplinary courses. Consult requirements for the major or contact the Office of Admissions.
  3. Integrative Studies in Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences, (8 credits)
    May be satisfied by completion of:
    200 level:  One Integrative Studies in Social Science (ISS) course numbered 200 to 299. Students matriculating at Michigan State University for the first time have additional options within the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences to satisfy this requirement. Visit www.admissions.msu.edu/admission/transfer_integrativestudies.asp or contact an academic advisor for additional information.
    300 level: Interdisciplinary social science courses from four-year institutions may be transferable. Community college transfers must complete this requirement through Michigan State University.
  4. Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities, (8 credits)
    1st Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities course: May be satisfied by a completion of one IAH course numbered below 211 or equivalent plus completion of one year of English composition. Completion of this requirement also fulfills the Tier I writing requirement referenced in item 1. above.
    2nd Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities course: One additional IAH course numbered 211 or higher.  Students matriculating at Michigan State University for the first time have additional options within the Arts and Humanities to satisfy this requirement.  Visit www.admissions.msu.edu/admission/transfer_integrativestudies.asp or contact an academic advisor for additional information.
  5. Mathematics (3-5 credits)
     May be satisfied by completing courses equivalent to those in the options below:
    1. Complete both of the following:
      1. MTH 103 College Algebra; and
      2. One of the following courses: MTH 112 Finite Mathematics: Applications of College Algebra, MTH 114 Trigonometry, or MTH 201 Elementary Mathematics for Teachers I; or STT 200  Statistical Methods or STT 201 Statistical Methods.
    2. Complete one of the following:
      1. MTH 110 Finite Mathematics and Elements of College Algebra, MTH 116 College Algebra and Trigonometry, MTH 124  Survey of Calculus I, MTH 132 Calculus I, or MTH 152H Honors Calculus I.
Mathematics requirements for certain majors are more extensive than the university requirement.  Consult requirements for the major or contact the Office of Admissions for more information.  

Reverse Transfer

Michigan State University has Reverse Transfer Agreements with several community colleges in Michigan. Reverse transfer is the process by which transfer students enrolled at a four-year institution transfer credits back to a community college for the purpose of attaining a degree, diploma or certification from the community college.

MSU transfer students may indicate their interest in reverse transfer by completing a Reverse Transfer Transcript Release Form in order to have their university transcript sent back to their community college. The community college will evaluate the course work to determine whether degree, diploma or certification requirements are met and whether a degree or other credential will be awarded by the community college. Any community-college degree or other credential will be awarded in the semester or year all final requirements are met at the community college.

Students interested in this opportunity should view the current agreements and complete the Transcript Release Form at:
https://reg.msu.edu/ROInfo/ReverseTransfer.aspx.

International Student Admission

Michigan State University is authorized under immigration regulations to enroll nonimmigrant students and welcomes applications from such persons. An international student is defined as a person holding a nonimmigrant visa.

Prospective students are encouraged to begin the application process one year prior to the anticipated semester of enrollment.   Michigan State University encourages prospective students to use the online application available at www.admissions.msu.edu.

Students from abroad, educated in academic systems whose requirements are comparable to 12 years in an elementary and secondary college preparatory education program in the United States, may apply for admission. Official copies of all mark sheets, transcripts, diplomas and certificates from high schools and ALL other academic institutions must accompany the application. These records must show courses taken and grades earned, and must be translated into English if the original records are in another language. If a translation is supplied, it should be certified as accurate and correct by an appropriate public or school official, or sponsoring agency or government. The official record in the original language should also be included.

For information on freshman admission, see www.admissions.msu.edu/apply/international. For information on transfer admission, see www.admissions.msu.edu/apply/transfer.

When admitted, a digital letter of admission will be available on the student's online portal.  All International applicants seeking an F-1 or J-1 visa are also required to submit adequate evidence of financial support to cover the cost of attendance for at least one full year of study at Michigan State University. Students, however, must consider that financial resources will be needed for the entire four- to five-year period required to complete an undergraduate program. PLEASE NOTE: No need-based financial aid is available for international undergraduate students.

Evidence of adequate financial support and payment of the Advanced Enrollment Deposit must be received before the I-20  or DS-2019 forms will be mailed.  All international students studying on an F-1 visa are required to present the I-20 Form when applying for an F-1 Student Visa and again at the port-of-entry into the United States.  Students applying for a J-1 Exchange Visitor Visa will need to present a DS-2019 Form.  This form is available from the organization/program sponsoring the student, or from the Office of International Students and Scholars at Michigan State University.  Applicants enrolled at another U.S. institution with an F-1 Student Visa must be released from SEVIS by their current institution before MSU can issue a new I-20 Form.

Details are available at https://admissions.msu.edu/admitted/international/reserve-your-place/obtain-your-immigration-documents.aspx.

Students who enter the United States with an I–20 Form from another institution should be aware that they must enroll at that school before they are eligible to transfer to Michigan State University. Such transfers require both formal admission to Michigan State University and notification to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Only students intending to enroll at MSU should enter the United States with the I-20 Form issued by MSU. Additional up-to-date information concerning immigration guidelines can be found at www.oiss.msu.edu.


Opportunities for High-Achieving International Students

Michigan State University recognizes the educational value of certain pre-matriculation programs by granting academic credit, waiving requirements, and/or placing students in advanced courses. Such programs include the Form VI (A-level work) and those described in the Freshman Admission section of this catalog.

Information on A-level equivalencies is available at https://admissions.msu.edu/documents/MSU_International_A_Levels.pdf. The SAT or ACT examinations are not required for international students, but are highly recommended. To receive an invitation to and be eligible for merit-based scholarships from the Michigan State University Honors College, SAT or ACT scores are required.


English Language Proficiency Requirement

All international undergraduate applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate English language proficiency.   Michigan State University offers provisional admission to applicants who meet the academic and financial requirements, but whose English language proficiency does not meet the levels for regular admission. Provisionally admitted students must take an English Language Center placement test upon arrival at MSU to assess their need for additional language instruction at the English Language Center, and to correct their deficiency within three consecutive semesters of enrollment.  English Language courses taught through the English Language Center will likely delay the start of a student’s academic program.

For information regarding the number of credits that may count towards a bachelor's degree, refer to the Graduation Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree section of this catalog.


Minimum Requirement for Regular Admission

All international applicants are required to be proficient in English as a condition for regular admission to MSU. Applicants will be required to demonstrate their proficiency by meeting certain minimum standards on any one of the following tests:

  1. Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A total score of 550 (paper version), 79 (Internet version) or above with no subscores below 52 (paper version) or 17 (Internet version) is required. Visit www.ets.org/toefl for details.
  2. International English Language Testing System (IELTS). A score of 6.5 or higher. Visit www.ielts.org for details.
  3. Michigan State University Certificate of English Language Proficiency (CELP). A score of 65 with no subscores below 15. 
  4. Michigan State University English Language Test (MSUELT). An average score of at least 80 with no subscores below 80, or an average score above 85 with no subscores below 78, is required. The MSUELT is given on the campus of Michigan State University at the English Language Center.
  5. Advanced Placement English Language (APIEL) A score of 4 or higher. Visit www.apcentral.collegeboard.com for details.
  6. SAT Verbal. A score of 480 or higher. Visit www.collegeboard.com for details.
  7. ACT English. A score of 18 or higher. Visit www.act.org for details.
  8. Pearson Test of English Academic (PTEA) A minimum score of 53 and no subscore below 48.
     

 


Minimum Scores for Provisional Admission

International applicants who have acceptable academic credentials may be admitted to Michigan State University on a provisional basis with scores between 500 and 549 (paper version) or 60 and 78 (Internet version) on the TOEFL; 6.0 on the IELTS; or between 65 and 79 on the MSUELT; or between 46 and 52 on the PTEA.

Provisionally admitted students must take English as a Second Language (ESL) courses at the English Language Center, and restrictions are placed on the number of academic courses that they may take, if any. In order to remain enrolled, any international student admitted provisionally because of an English language deficiency must reach English language proficiency within three (3) consecutive semesters of enrollment in appropriate English as a Second Language (ESL) courses (Summer may be excluded) or demonstrate consistent progress in English language proficiency as determined by the Director of the English Language Center.

Students enrolled in English as a Second Language (ESL) courses who wish to test out of additional English language courses may submit official evidence of English language proficiency as noted in the Minimum Requirement for Regular Admission. In order to have the official score accepted as evidence of English language proficiency, students must also complete their current ESL enrollment successfully. Official scores of English language proficiency received after the first day of classes in any semester will not be reviewed until the student’s current ESL enrollment is completed successfully.


Required English Language Center Attendance

As the language requirement is a university policy, a decision by the English Language Center (ELC) for a student to enroll in its program is binding and is not negotiable by the student. Students who are required to attend ELC classes are obligated to show good class attendance and make an earnest effort to remove the language deficiency as soon as possible. The ELC program must be satisfactorily completed before regular admission status may be granted.

See Costs in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section and the English Language Center in the College of Arts and Letters section of Academic Programs for additional information.

 


International Student Accident and Health Insurance

International students are required to have health and accident insurance. Students are required to purchase the Michigan State University Student Accident and Health Insurance Plan unless they have evidence of alternative insurance equal in benefits and provisions to the Michigan State University plan. Fees for the student's insurance are included with the bill for tuition and fees during registration. Waivers to allow purchase of alternative plans must be submitted via a student's StuInfo account at https://stuinfo.msu.edu


Orientation

New undergraduate international students must attend the mandatory international orientation program. Admitted international students should access their "Next Steps" by logging onto their online account at www.admissions.msu.edu/your-account. The mandatory orientation program will introduce new international students to the services available to undergraduate students and provide academic advising. For regularly admitted students, academic advising includes the selection of courses, preparation of a class schedule, and registration in classes.   Information on orientation, instructions for arrival on campus and tentative orientation schedule is available through the Office for International Students and Scholars at www.oiss.msu.edu


Readmission Procedure

Any undergraduate student whose enrollment at this university is interrupted for any reason so that he or she has not been enrolled for three consecutive semesters, including the summer sessions,  who was recessed or dismissed from the university, who was not allowed to continue in his or her major, or who has completed prior courses of study, should submit a readmission application to the Office of the Registrar via the web at www.reg.msu.edu at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student intends to resume studies. International students should submit their application at least four months prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student intends to resume studies.

Students applying for readmission after academic recess or dismissal should refer to the section on Readmission After Academic Recess or Dismissal.

 


Transfer Credit Beyond Sophomore Standing

Students who have matriculated at Michigan State University and have achieved junior standing (56 semester credits) may not earn credits from two-year institutions.

Students who have matriculated at Michigan State University and have not yet achieved junior standing (56 semester credits) may earn credits from two-year institutions, up to the 56-semester credit limit.

 


Academic Orientation


Academic Orientation Programs

New undergraduate students engage in a comprehensive orientation process designed to support and guide them as they transition to MSU. Because of MSU’s commitment to student success, as a condition of course enrollment, all new undergraduate students are required to attend the Academic Orientation Program (AOP), an early step in the academic orientation and transitions process.

AOP for new students who enter MSU fall semester takes place in June and July. The program lasts a day and a half for freshmen and one day for transfer students. There is a program in late August for students who are not able to attend a program in June or July. International undergraduate freshmen and transfer students on an F1 or J1 visa who enter fall semester complete an online pre-arrival module, attend a mandatory week-long orientation program prior to the start of classes, as well as an extended orientation during the fall semester. International students with other visa types who enter fall semester contact academic orientation and transitions staff to arrange their orientation date. All undergraduate freshman and transfer students who enter spring or summer semester attend a one-day AOP session immediately preceding the first day of classes for that semester.

Prior to attending the Academic Orientation Program, students take one or more online placement tests. During AOP, new undergraduate students learn about their program of study and MSU’s Undergraduate Learning Goals (ULGs), set their own goals as they think about their purpose and passion, meet with an academic advisor and enroll in courses, and learn about strategies for academic success. They also become familiar with campus resources, campus life and what it means to be a Spartan. After AOP, the academic orientation and transitions process continues as faculty, academic advisors, other university staff and students collaborate to support our new students as they engage in their undergraduate education. Students discover more about themselves and what they want to study and develop professional abilities associated with the ULGs as they: make connections, stretch themselves, play with a purpose, learn from difference, and make time to reflect.

Freshman and transfer students are required to register for the Academic Orientation Program online at https://admissions.msu.edu/aop_assignment/signup.asp. Students who do not register for and attend the Academic Orientation Program will have their admission to the university cancelled.

 


Academic Placement Tests

Each entering undergraduate student will take one or more placement tests depending on the nature of the student's previous academic program and intended academic program at Michigan State University. The results of these tests will be used by the student and the academic advisor to develop an academic learning plan. Following is a brief explanation of the use of the various placement tests:

 


First-Year Writing

Although some international students place in WRA 101 after completing their required ESL courses, placement in First-Year Writing (WRA) is usually determined based on relevant ACT or SAT scores.  There are three possibilities for placement in WRA courses: general (WRA 101); honors (WRA 195H); and preparatory (WRA 1004). Students who place into and complete WRA 1004/0102 must subsequently enroll in the WRA course numbered 101. Students placed into WRA 1004 who wish to appeal their WRA placement have the opportunity to write a placement essay during the fall welcome period immediately preceding the start of classes.


 


Mathematics (Algebra)

All students entering MSU are required to take the un-proctored Mathematics Placement Service (MPS) examination online, before attending AOP with the following exceptions: students who will take a mathematics course at MSU and have either an ACT Math sub-score of at least 28 or an SAT Math sub-score of at least 640; students with credit for MTH 103 and also credit for either MTH 112, 114, 124, 132, 152H or 201, or STT 200 or 201; students with credits for MTH 110 or 116. Those transfer students who must take introductory mathematics or statistics courses to meet university or program requirements are required to take the placement test.  Students who are transferring specific college course credit should enroll in the next level course, as appropriate to their program. 

Students are urged to take the test via the web before their Academic Orientation Program, preferably by mid-May.  The test can be accessed through www.math.msu.edu/mps. However, a student who wishes to complete the university mathematics requirement by waiver must complete the test in a proctored setting at an Academic Orientation Program or one of the Michigan State University Testing Centers to be eligible for the waiver.

Each student whose score on the MPS examination indicates the need for additional pre-college preparation in mathematics must either successfully complete Mathematics 1825 prior to fulfilling the University graduation requirement in mathematics or degree program requirements or demonstrate readiness for college mathematics by repeating the MPS examination, prior to matriculation at MSU, and receiving an appropriate score.



Foreign Language

A student who has studied a foreign language in high school and (1) wishes to enroll for a course in the language or (2) wishes to use it to meet the graduation requirement in an academic program must take a placement test in that language. However, all students who have studied a foreign language in high school are encouraged to take the relevant placement test. Students transferring college credit in a foreign language are not required to take a placement test. 

Language placement tests in French, German, and Spanish should be taken online at least one month prior to the student’s assigned Academic Orientation Program. These tests are available at http://flplacement.cal.msu.edu.

For further information regarding these exams and placement in other languages, contact the appropriate department:

Department of Romance and Classical Studies at http://www.rcs.msu.edu or 1-517-355-8305. For more information on the French and Spanish placement tests, see http://www.rcs.msu.edu/undergraduate/language-placement/.

Department of Linguistics, Germanic, Slavic, Asian and African Languages at www.linglang.msu.edu or 1-517-353-0740. Students wishing to take the Japanese placement test should follow the directions at: http://linglang.msu.edu/degree-programs/japanese/japanese-placement-test/. Students wishing to take the Chinese placement test should follow the directions at: http://linglang.msu.edu/degree-programs/chinese/chinese-placement-test/


 


Remedial-Developmental-Preparatory Courses

The policy governing remedial–developmental–preparatory types of courses was established to protect the academic standards of Michigan State University undergraduate degrees while at the same time reinforcing the university's commitment to assist students in remedying their academic deficiencies in fundamental skill areas. The policy serves to motivate students to overcome their deficiencies while ensuring that all students complete a minimum of 120 credits of college level work as a condition of graduation.

Remedial-developmental-preparatory course numbers are four digits, rather than the three digits used for all other courses. The fourth or last digit identifies the type of remedial-developmental-preparatory course. For example, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures 1004 is a Type 4 course.

There are five types of remedial-developmental-preparatory courses.

Type 1:
Single courses designed to remedy deficiencies identified by Michigan State University placement test scores. The removal of any such deficiencies, either by one retest or by passing the course, is required as a condition for graduation.

Credits earned are included in all university computations except the total number required for graduation.

Type 2:
Course sequences designed to remedy deficiencies identified by Michigan State University placement test scores. The removal of any such deficiencies, either by one retest or by passing the courses, is required as a condition for graduation. More than the usual number of contact hours may be required.

Credits earned are included in all university computations except the total number required for graduation.

Type 3:
Courses designed to remedy deficiencies identified by Michigan State University placement test scores. The removal of such deficiencies, either by one retest or by passing the course, is required only as a condition for entry into some degree programs, and is required as a condition for graduation only for students in those programs.  More than the usual number of contact hours may be required.

Credits earned are included in all university computations and are included in the total number required for graduation.

Type 4:
Courses that students place into because of inadequate scores on Michigan State University placement tests that identify relevant skill deficiencies, although they do not measure knowledge in the course material. The removal of skill deficiencies is not part of the course objectives. It is expected that students will be enrolled concurrently in Type I and/or Type II and/or Type III courses for purposes of remedying those deficiencies. More than the usual number of contact hours may be required. 

Credits earned are included in all university computations and are included in the total number required for graduation.

Type 5:
Courses that may be required by departments or colleges for some students. The course may be designed either to prepare the student to handle the subject matter of a required entry level college course, or to improve his or her study skills or ability to make productive use of university offerings in general. More than the usual number of contact hours may be required.

Credits earned are included in all University computations except the total required for graduation.

Remedial–developmental–preparatory courses may not carry numbers above the 100 level and may not be offered under variable content numbers.

The removal of academic deficiencies, which would preclude graduation from Michigan State University, should have the highest priority in student program planning. Drops from Type I and Type II courses should not normally be processed except to facilitate transfer between sections. If a course overload requires that a student drop one or more courses in a specific semester, courses in the regular program of studies shall be dropped in preference to those designed to remove deficiencies.

The University Committee on Curriculum controls the number of  remedial-developmental–preparatory courses and assures conformity of such courses with existing policy. Upon recommendation by the University Committee on Curriculum, the Faculty Senate approves remedial–developmental–preparatory courses by type.

 


Living and Learning


Housing Information

Information regarding university housing is sent to each freshman and transfer student entering fall semester with the letter of admission. Information regarding university housing is sent to each freshman and transfer student entering spring semester or summer session after the letter of admission has been issued. Former students may apply for housing after their applications for readmission have been accepted. All returning students will be accommodated in on-campus housing as space is available, regardless of their class standing.  See University Housing Policy in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section of this catalog, and visit the Residential and Hospitality Services Web site at www.rhs.msu.edu.

 


Neighborhood Communities

Michigan State University pioneered the model for living and learning communities. The Brody Complex, East Complex, and South Complex halls were designated as living and learning complexes when established in the 1960's. The living and learning community concept is based on the premise that the cultural and intellectual life of the student is enhanced when the educational process extends beyond the classroom into the total environment of the residence halls. Now known as Neighborhoods, the concept has been extended to include the North Neighborhood and the River Trail Neighborhood.

Each Neighborhood provides an opportunity for students to relate to a smaller unit of the university and to participate in various social and cultural activities. In addition to the usual facilities of traditional residence halls, at the core of each Neighborhood is the Engagement Center that includes classrooms, lecture halls, faculty offices, and health and wellness facilities. Faculty, academic advisors, tutors, and other staff support students’ overall intellectual professional, social, and personal development. A range of university courses is scheduled in each neighborhood complex, facilitating student and faculty interaction outside the classroom. More information is available at www.neighborhoods.msu.edu.

Students in the Honors College and Academic Scholars program have the opportunity to select honors–only floors. James Madison College, Lyman Briggs College, and the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities are highly visible, four–year, residentially-based academic programs. In addition, a range of shorter–term options addressing student academic interests have emerged. These include BROAD: Business Residential Option for Academic Distinction, Drew Science Enrichment Laboratory, MRULE - Multi-Racial Unity Living Experience, Residential Experience for Spartan Engineers, and RISE - Residential Initiative on the Study of the Environment, for students interested in the study of the environment.

Residence Life staff are committed to enhancing the living and learning experience by assisting with existing options and building strong learning communities throughout the residential system.

Additional information is available at Living and Learning at www.admissions.msu.edu/Living-Learning_Programs.asp.

 


Student Rights and Responsibilities

Refer to the statement on Student Rights and Responsibilities in the General Information, Policies, Procedures and Regulations section of this catalog.

 


Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative

Office of the Provost

Luke Schultheis, Assistant Dean and Director

All undergraduate students who have been admitted to Michigan State University with fewer than 56 credits are automatically enrolled as part of the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative (NSSC) with the exception of lower division students who are enrolled in residential colleges (James Madison College, Lyman Briggs College, Residential College in the Arts and Humanities). Services provided as part of the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative are available to all students whether admitted to a major or not.  The academic responsibility for all students who are enrolled in the NSSC rests solely with the NSSC.  Academic responsibility includes such functions as monitoring students’ academic progress and making decisions concerning retention and academic status.  All students who are enrolled in the NSSC may select and be considered for admission to a degree-granting college after completing 28 credits. See individual college sections for any admission requirements.  Students must select and be accepted for admission to a degree-granting college by the time they reach junior standing (56 credits).

The mission of the NSSC is to help undergraduate students achieve their academic goals at Michigan State University.  The NSSC is a collaborative effort among multiple student support units across campus.  The staff in these units provide personal attention to students in order to assist them in maximizing their potential and achieving academic success.

 

Enrollment in the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative

Many students come to the university uncertain about a preferred area of academic interest.  Other students find their academic interests shift or expand as they are introduced to the many and varied academic experiences associated with attendance at the university.  Students who are undecided about their fields of study may select the No-Preference option at the time of admission or at a later time. Certain major and degree programs specify the completion of particular courses or sequences of courses during the freshman and sophomore years.  Students who have not completed such courses or sequences early in their programs of study may need additional time to meet the requirements for those programs. Students with interests in specific fields of study may declare a major preference related to those fields.

The No-Preference option allows students to investigate the wide variety of majors available at Michigan State University. Professional advisors in the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative (NSSC) serve as the primary advisors for students who select the No-Preference option.  The advisors assist students with major and career advice and course selection.

Students who declare major preferences are assigned to academic advisors in the colleges of their major preferences.  However, the services and professional advisors in the NSSC are also available to these students.

 


Student Success

The Neighborhood Engagement Centers are staffed and supported by a variety of Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative (NSSC) staff including a Neighborhood Director, Academic Advisors and other professionals who care deeply about Spartan students and are able to connect them with the resources they need.

Neighborhood Academic Advisors specifically assist and guide students to the selection of a major, monitor their academic progress, provide academic advising, guide students toward activities that are designed to enhance their personal and professional growth, and make appropriate referrals to enable students to take advantage of other resources and services the university offers. NSSC staff are readily accessible in the Neighborhood Engagement Centers.

  • Brody Engagement Center for students living in –Armstrong, Bailey, Bryan, Butterfield, Emmons, and Rather residence halls.  Call 353–3863.
  • Holden Engagement Center for students living in the South Complex–Case, Wilson, Wonders, and Holden residence halls.  Call 353–1660.
  • Hubbard Engagement Center for students living in the East Complex–Akers, Fee, Holmes, Hubbard, and McDonel residence halls. Call 353–6387.
  • McDonel Engagement Center for students living in Van Hoosen Apartments, and McDonel, Owen and Shaw residence halls. Call 884-4080.
  • North Engagement Center (MSU Union) for students living in off-campus and in Abbot, Mason, Phillips, Snyder, Campbell, Gilchrist, Landon, Mayo, Williams and Yakeley residence halls. Call 884-4050.

While students are encouraged to visit the Engagement Center in their Neighborhood, students can visit an Engagement Center in any of the above locations for academic advising and assistance.

For additional information, e-mail nssc@msu.edu or visit www.msu.edu/unit/uud.


Learning Resources Center

The Learning Resources Center (LRC) offers one-on-one course specific tutoring, study-skills related seminars and workshops, and a fully equipped computer learning lab. The LRC’s goal is to assist students in developing strategies and techniques essential to becoming successful students. LRC services are available at the main office in 202 Ernst Bessey Hall, the Computer/Learning Lab in 204 Ernst Bessey Hall and offsite locations associated with Engagement Centers where evening tutoring occurs.

Main office services include one-on-one course specific assistance with trained tutors. Students may also meet with professional staff for help with reading comprehension, math anxiety, science and technology literacy, and general learning skills.

At the Computer/Learning Lab, students may use interactive study support software to enhance and develop skills; view classroom materials placed on reserve by instructors; and use online computers with laser printing, scanning and one-on-one technological assistance.

For additional information, or to schedule appointments or make seminar and workshop reservations, call 1-517-355-2363 or visit www.lrc.msu.edu.


Academic Advisement

Each student is responsible for knowing university, college, and department or school requirements as stated in the catalog and in college and department or school printed materials.

To assist the student in interpreting policies and requirements, academic advisement is provided through the colleges and the Neighborhood Engagement Centers. Advisors will provide students with information about the broad range of advising services. Students are strongly encouraged to consult regularly with an advisor. Students may also check their progress toward a degree by using Degree Navigator, available at www.degnav.msu.edu.

The advising programs vary in specific details. Each student is assigned to an advisor, or to advisors to consider personal goals, explore interests, consider educational options, and focus on courses and co-curricular opportunities that will enhance their undergraduate learning experience. No–Preference students are primarily advised in the Neighborhood Engagement Centers. See the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative and the Admission to a Degree College sections of this catalog for further information.

Academic advising is a continuous process in which a student and advisor discuss possible educational options, in the student's total educational program; in specific fields of study; and in potential careers, in order that the student may make informed choices. Academic advising also includes interpretation of the Michigan State University catalog and guidance materials provided by the student's college and department or school and referral to other university resources for academic, career, and personal assistance as needed.


Degree Navigator

Students may check their progress toward a degree by using the online advising tool, Degree Navigator, available at www.degnav.msu.edu. Individually and with their advisors, students may explore degree program requirements and experiment with different scenarios to learn how their past and current course work might apply to many other majors

 


Admission to a Degree-Granting College

Students may be admitted as freshmen to James Madison College, Lyman Briggs College and the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities. Students may be admitted to certain colleges following completion of a designated combination or sequence of courses. (see Admission to the College in the appropriate college section of this catalog). Students who have completed the prerequisite courses for admission to the College of Nursing may apply during the freshman year for subsequent admission. Any student who has reached junior standing by earning 56 credits must be admitted to a degree-granting college to continue as a student at Michigan State University.

ACCEPTANCE  BY A DEGREE-GRANTING COLLEGE. A student seeking admission to a degree-granting college will be accepted by a degree-granting college provided he or she:

  1. has earned a minimum of 28 credits (effective Fall 2015),
  2. is in good standing (see Academic Standing of Undergraduate Students - ASUS - for additional information),
  3. has the required grade-point average in designated combinations or sequences of courses within the 28 credit minimum (see Requirements for Admission to the College in the appropriate college section of the catalog), and
  4. is selected for admission by the duly established selection committee in any department, college, or school where a specific limitation on enrollment has been established.

TEACHER CERTIFICATION. For information about teacher certification opportunities, options, and requirements, refer to the statement on Teacher Certification in the Department of Teacher Education section of this catalog.

REFUSAL OF ACCEPTANCE BY A DEGREE-GRANTING COLLEGE. By the fifth day of the next semester, students who fail to meet the requirements for admission to the degree-granting college of their choice but have earned a minimum of 56 credits and are in good standing must:

  1. apply for acceptance by another degree-granting college, or
  2. transfer to an appropriate program in the College of Arts and Letters, the College of Social Science, or the College of Natural Science.

 


Enrollment


Enrollment

Enrollment is the selection of courses for a fall, spring, or summer schedule based on the student's Academic Progress Plan previously developed and continually reviewed with an academic advisor.  

 


Classification of Students

For purposes of enrollment and determining eligibility for certain student activities, a division of students by class is made by the Office of the Registrar at the end of each semester on the basis of the number of credits earned and according to the following schedule:

Credits Earned  Classification 
fewer than 28  Freshman 
28 to 55  Sophomore 
56 to 87  Junior
88 and above Senior

Students who have matriculated at Michigan State University and have achieved junior standing (56 semester credits) may not earn credits from two-year institutions.

Students who have matriculated at Michigan State University and have not yet achieved junior standing (56 semester credits) may earn credits from two-year institutions, up to the 56-semester credit limit.

 


Registration

Registration is the process of securing classes for which one has enrolled by payment of charges due or confirmation of attendance, if no payment is due.

 

 


Period Covered by Registration

Refer to the statement on Period Covered by Registration in The Academic Program section of this catalog. 

 


Semester Credit Load

All undergraduate baccalaureate programs require a minimum of 120 credits. Most programs are designed so that a student starting a program as a freshman may finish it in 8 semesters by satisfactorily completing an average of 15 credits a semester.  In practice, students usually carry from 12 to 18 credits a semester depending on personal circumstances and the chosen program of study. Students with less than a 2.50 grade–point average (GPA) the preceding semester should not enroll for more than 15 or 16 credits except when required by the specific program. Only under unusual circumstances will a student be permitted to carry more than 20 credits.

A student with less than satisfactory academic performance may be required to take a reduced credit load as a condition of continued registration in the university.

 


Full-Time Students

Undergraduate students must carry at least 12 credits a semester or summer session in order to:

  1. participate in intercollegiate athletics.
  2. qualify for the Dean's List for the semester.
  3. qualify for most scholarships, awards, and financial aids. Most of these are limited to undergraduate students carrying at least 12 credits a semester excluding credits for any course carried as a visitor.  Students should determine the specific requirements from the appropriate agency or contact the Office of Financial Aid.
  4. be certified in full-time status to loan agencies and other external entities.

Students participating in authorized forty hour/week internships or cooperative work programs are considered full time for all the purposes listed above.

Federal agencies such as the Department of Education, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Department of Homeland Security may have separate and distinct full-time status requirements.

 

 


Selecting a Major

A major is a primary field of study. Selection of a field of study as a major preference may be made at the time the application for admission is submitted. Any student entering the university with fewer than 56 credits may choose to enter without a major preference by selecting No-Preference. A No–Preference student may defer declaring a major preference or major until there has been an opportunity to explore a variety of fields under special academic advising directed by an advisor in the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative.  Students meeting college admission requirements have the option of declaring a major at 28 credits.  A major must be selected before junior standing (56 credits) is reached.

Certain academic programs which specify particular courses or sequences of courses during the first two years may require more than eight semesters for completion of the degree program.


Changing a Major

FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES. Students initiate changes of major preference either in the office of the associate dean of the college major or in their Neighborhood Engagement Center. For students who have not declared a major and have fewer than 56 credit hours, the associate dean’s function is served by the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative (NSSC). Exceptions are James Madison College, Lyman Briggs College, the Residential College in Arts and Humanities.

JUNIORS AND SENIORS. A student wishing to change a major in one degree college to a major in another degree college (or within the same college) must initiate the change in the office of the associate dean of the college to which the student wishes to transfer.

The student must meet the requirements for graduation given in the catalog current at the time the change is effective.  Twenty credits must be completed while enrolled in the major in the college in which the degree is to be earned.


Selecting a Minor

A minor is a secondary field of study at the undergraduate level. It is a coherent set of courses that provides a student with an introduction to a field of study. Minors are supplementary to the student’s major. Minors are not open to students who are in majors in a field of study with the same name represented by the minor, and minors may be limited to students in particular majors or colleges. The minimum number of credits for a minor is 15. The Academic Programs catalog must clearly state if some of these credits for the minor are required to be “unique.” “Unique” credits for a minor are defined as credits that do not count for a course taken to satisfy another university, college, or major requirement. 

 


Guest Status at Another Institution

MSU students may attend other institutions as Guest Students or Non–matriculated Students for short periods for the purpose of earning credit for transfer to Michigan State University.

Students planning to attend institutions within the State of Michigan should use the Michigan Uniform Undergraduate Guest Application form available on the web at www.reg.msu.edu. Students who wish to attend non-Michigan institutions should obtain application forms from the host institution. The completed form should be taken to the host school.

A student wishing to take courses at another institution should consult an academic advisor or the Transfer MSU course equivalency table on the web at www.transfer.msu.edu to assure transferability.

A minimum grade of 2.0 must be earned in each course in order for the credit to be transferred to Michigan State University.

Michigan State University students who have achieved junior standing (56 semester credits) may not earn credit in two–year institutions for transfer to Michigan State.



Academic Opportunities


Entrepreneurship and Innovation Experiences Option

An Entrepreneurship and Innovation Experiences Option (E&I) is a project consisting of independent and original work that builds on the content of a course in which a student is enrolled but extends the experience of that course beyond the typical scope and content. E&I Experiences Options allow undergraduates the opportunity to add entrepreneurial content to courses already in the student’s program, thus providing a flexible alternative for those interested in exploring entrepreneurial ideas beyond the normal course requirements. An E&I Experiences Option can be in any course in any discipline. Students propose the E&I Experiences Option to the faculty instructor of record for the course. E& I Experiences Option requests must be accompanied by the Application for Entrepreneurship and Innovation Experiences Option form. E&I Experiences Options that are approved and completed will be designated on the student’s transcript.  For more information, students should contact the undergraduate advising office of their college.



 


Reserve Officers' Training Corps Army and Air Force

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps Army and Air Force (ROTC) programs provide preprofessional preparation for future Army and Air Force officers. They are designed to develop the skills of men and women who can apply their education to their initial assignments as commissioned officers. In order to receive a commission, ROTC cadets must complete all requirements for a degree in accordance with university requirements, as well as complete certain courses specified by the Department of Military Science or the Department of Aerospace Studies. Depending on the student's program of study, such courses may supplement or serve as electives with the approval of the appropriate academic unit.

For details on the Air Force or Army ROTC program, refer to Department of Aerospace Studies or Department of Military Science in the Other Departments and Offices for Research and Services section of this catalog.

 


Prelaw Study

The Prelaw Handbook, the official law school guide published by the Association of American Law Schools, emphasizes that there is not a prescribed course of study which can be recommended to all students seeking to enter law school.  The two most important law school admission criteria, according to the Prelaw Handbook, are the student's undergraduate grade–point average and their score on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). The admission policies of various law schools, and the degree to which they utilize other criteria as well as the above, are described in the Prelaw Handbook which may be examined in the University Library or purchased in most bookstores.  The prelaw student is urged to study this handbook carefully and to discuss it with an advisor in the college of their choice.

Although the Prelaw Handbook does not single out specific courses or majors as being especially suitable for prelaw studies, it does call attention to certain skills and insights which the student should seek to develop, and which the LSAT attempts to measure. These are the ability to think carefully and critically, to comprehend the thoughts of others and express one's own with accuracy and clarity, and to understand critically the human values and institutions with which the law deals.

The development of these abilities is not the monopoly of any one subject area, department, or school. While the  Prelaw Handbook does discuss specific areas of study and the potential contribution each can make to prelaw education, it prefaces its discussion by insisting on the importance of a prelegal education of the broadest scope. Thus, a prelaw student may major in virtually any discipline, provided that the major is made part of a rigorous and broad education.

The following colleges at Michigan State University have defined prelaw programs and advisors:  Arts and Letters, Business, James Madison, and Social Science. Page references to these programs may be found in the General Index.  Additional information may be obtained from the office of the associate dean of these and other colleges.

 


Study Abroad

Michigan State University is a national leader in study abroad, offering more than 275 programs, on all continents and in over 60 countries.  Programs are offered every session, including winter and spring break, and range from one week to two semesters. 

Over 25 percent of current MSU students  participate in study abroad and the program continues to grow.  An increasingly common component of excellence in higher education today, study abroad is quickly becoming an integral part of the undergraduate experience at Michigan State University.

Programs are offered in many academic disciplines in all colleges.  Studying abroad helps students develop the academic/intellectual, personal, professional, and intercultural skills and attitudes required to become effective and competitive in the global environments they will encounter after graduation.

Students are encouraged to explore study abroad opportunities early. They may start by visiting the Study Abroad Web site at  www.studyabroad.msu.edu, by calling 1-517-353-8920, or by visiting the Study Abroad Advising Center in the International Center, 427 N. Shaw, Room 108.

For additional information, see the Guest Status at Another Institution section of this catalog.


Co-Sponsored Study Abroad Programs

Co-sponsored programs are study abroad programs which are proposed and sponsored by an academic unit at Michigan State University, implemented by a international host partner institution, and staffed by non-Michigan State University faculty. Co-sponsored study abroad programs may include exchange programs, direct enrollment in an international university, and consortial or other provider programs. Co-sponsored programs are comparable in quality to regular Michigan State University study abroad programs; they constitute an area or field of study that is encompassed as part of the sponsoring academic unit(s) at Michigan State University. Co-sponsored programs, upon approval, yield Michigan State University credit and grades. Although the "co-sponsored" designation and benefits do not automatically extend to all the academic offerings of a host institution, there may be multiple areas of study within the host institution that are recognized as Michigan State University co-sponsored programs. Multiple Michigan State University academic units may decide to pursue co-sponsored programs with selected high quality universities.

For advice on how to incorporate study abroad or co-sponsored study abroad into your undergraduate program, see your academic advisor.

 


Undergraduate Learning Assistants

UNDERGRADUATE LEARNING ASSISTANTS

Undergraduate Learning Assistant (ULA) is a term referring to any undergraduate student who assists the faculty-of-record in that faculty member’s assigned, for-credit course(s) at Michigan State University. An ULA can, under the mentorship and supervision of the faculty-of-record, assist in class preparation; objective grading; and active and collaborative learning exercises within lecture, laboratory, and discussion sections. No undergraduate student may perform activities requiring professional judgment such as determining course content, conducting lectures or seminars, performing subjective evaluations of student performance, or assigning grades for any for-credit course at Michigan State University.

Tutors, who are not part of the instructional team of a specific course, are not subject to this policy.

Selection Process

Individuals serving as an ULA must have demonstrated knowledge of subject content by either completing and excelling in the course or its equivalent in which they assist, or through a high level of performance in more advanced courses that depend upon knowledge of relevant course content.

Training

Each faculty-of-record utilizing ULAs must provide ULAs with appropriate guidelines and information necessary to carry out their assignments and responsibilities. These shall take the form of a written guide or handbook, which must reference relevant university policies.

Undergraduate Learning Assistant Responsibilities

Expectations and specific tasks necessary for the execution of ULA assignments and responsibilities must be provided in writing to the ULA. If ULAs are assigned to grade student work, it is the faculty-of-record’s responsibility to provide a framework for objective evaluation of student work, to train the ULA on the appropriate use of this framework, and to ensure that the ULA is using this framework correctly and reliably. The faculty-of-record also must inform ULAs about the importance of maintaining student confidentiality with regard to student work.

Evaluation of Undergraduate Learning Assistant Performance

The faculty-of-record has the responsibility for the performance and evaluation of ULAs serving in that course. ULAs must be systematically evaluated during and at the end of each semester. Feedback must be shared with the ULA with the goal of improving the learning experience, developing better ULA performance in the future, and ultimately in developing skill sets and attitudes needed in the workplace.

Stipends

The position of an ULA is typically a paid position. However, in some instances, following consultation with the course’s faculty-of-record, the ULA may exercise an option to enroll in course credit rather than receive pay. An ULA may not receive both course credit and pay for a single course to which they have been assigned. In no case may a student be enrolled in a course for which they serve as an ULA.

Administration and Oversight

Any questions concerning the administration of this policy should be referred to the Office of the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education and Dean of Undergraduate Studies.

 


Academic Standing


Academic Standing of Undergraduate Students


Introduction

The statement on ACADEMIC STANDING OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS (ASUS) was designed to create an early warning system to prevent students from getting too deeply into academic difficulty. The university requires a cumulative grade–point average (GPA) of 2.00 or above for graduation. The statement on ASUS establishes a system whereby at the end of any semester that a student's cumulative GPA  falls below 2.00, the student is assigned to a warning status designated as probation.

Under the statement on ASUS, the term "probation" is the functional equivalent of an academic warning. Students  placed on probation retain the right to participate in all university activities and retain all of the rights and privileges available to any student who is not currently subject to academic recess or dismissal.

In addition to the criteria contained in this statement on Academic Standing of Undergraduate Students (ASUS), undergraduate students who wish to be considered for federal financial aid must be making satisfactory progress toward the bachelor’s degree as defined in the Financial Aid for Undergraduates section of this publication.

 


Good Standing

A student is in good standing if the student is a new student, or the student's cumulative grade–point average is at least 2.00.

 


Probation

A student is on probation if during the most recent previous semester in attendance, the student had been in good standing, but at the end of that semester the cumulative grade–point average was below 2.00. Grades of I and ET are not considered in computing this grade–point average. The period of probation is one semester. If in the special case that there are grade changes during that semester which result in the student's cumulative grade–point average increasing to at least a 2.00, the student is returned to good standing.

Students on probation may be required to see an academic advisor. If they do not, a hold may be placed on their registration. If at the end of that semester, the cumulative grade–point average is at least 2.00, the student is returned to good standing. If not, the student will be put on final probation or recessed.

 


Final Probation

A student is on final probation if during the most recent previous semester in attendance, the student was on probation and at the end of the semester the cumulative grade–point average was still below 2.00 and the semester grade–point average was at least 2.00. Students with fewer than 30 credits earned at Michigan State University must have a semester grade–point average of 1.5 or higher. Grades of I and ET are not considered in computing the cumulative or semester grade–point average. The period of final probation is one semester. If in the special case there are grade changes during that semester which result in the student's grade–point average increasing to at least a 2.00, the student is returned to good standing.

Students on final probation may be required to see an academic advisor. If they do not, a hold may be placed on their registration. At the end of the semester on final probation, the cumulative grade–point average must be at least 2.00 or the student will be recessed. An exception to this can be made for students with 30 or fewer credits earned at Michigan State University.  If such a student has shown substantial progress during the semester and the evidence suggests that the student would attain good standing in one more semester, the student may be granted one additional semester on (extended) final probation at the discretion of the associate dean of the student's college.

 


Warning for Repeats

At the discretion of the associate dean of the student's college a student is normally put on warning for repeats after repeating between 10 and 14 credits . Students on warning for repeats may be required to see an academic advisor before enrolling for any subsequent semester. If they do not, a hold may be placed on their registration.


Warning for Lack of Satisfactory Progress in the Major

If at the end of a semester an upper-division student is not making satisfactory progress toward the degree requirements stated in the catalog (e.g., a student is not taking courses  in the student's major or the student's grade–point average in courses in the major is below the required major grade–point average), or the student's semester grade–point average is below 2.00, the student may be put on warning for lack of satisfactory progress in the major at the discretion of the associate dean of the student's college. Such students must be given a written statement of the criteria they must satisfy to progress satisfactorily. Students on warning for lack of satisfactory progress in the major may be required to see an academic advisor before enrolling. If they do not, a hold may be placed on their registration. If a student has been on warning for lack of satisfactory progress and is not making satisfactory progress in any subsequent semester, the student will normally be recessed. However, if lack of satisfactory progress is due to poor grades in the major courses and the student is otherwise in good standing, the student would be permitted, even encouraged, to remain at Michigan State University if the student changed to a more appropriate major.

 


Recess

  1. If in any semester a student receives all semester grades of 0.0 or I where numeric grades have been given and there are at least 6 credits of 0.0, the student will be recessed unless there are compelling reasons certified to the record by the associate dean of the student's college. If recessed, the student must remain out of Michigan State University for at least one calendar year.
  2. If at the end of a semester during which the student was on probation the cumulative grade–point average is still below 2.00 and the semester grade–point average is below 2.00 (1.5 for students with less than 30 credits earned at MSU), the student will be recessed. The student must remain out of Michigan State University for at least one calendar year.
  3. If at the end of a semester during which the student was on final probation the cumulative grade–point average is not at least 2.00, the student will be recessed. The student must remain out of Michigan State University for at least one calendar year.
  4. If a student has previously been put on warning for lack of satisfactory progress in the major and at the end of any subsequent semester the student is not making satisfactory progress, the student will be recessed. A student recessed for lack of satisfactory progress in the major must remain out of Michigan State University for at least one calendar year.
  5. If at the end of the third consecutive semester of enrollment a provisionally admitted student does not reach English language proficiency or does not demonstrate consistent progress in English language proficiency as determined by the Director of the English Language Center, the student will be recessed. The student must remain out of Michigan State University for at least one calendar year.

After a recessed student has been out of Michigan State University for the prescribed period, the student may be readmitted to Michigan State University at the discretion of the appropriate associate dean. If readmitted, the student will be put on probation, final probation, or warning for lack of progress in the major, and the associate dean may impose specific conditions in writing that must be met. A second recess is dismissal.

 


Dismissal

  1. If a student has previously been recessed or dismissed, readmitted, and again meets one of the criteria 1–5 for recess or has failed to comply with the specific written conditions imposed at the time of readmission, the student will be dismissed.

Students who have been dismissed must remain out of school for at least two years. After that period, they may be readmitted only if a convincing case can be made to the associate dean of the admitting college that circumstances have changed so that there is a reasonable probability of success. Students will be readmitted on probation, final probation, warning for repeats, or warning for lack of progress in the major as appropriate, and specific conditions in writing will be imposed.

 


Readmission after Academic Recess


After Academic Recess

The recessed student is normally allowed a second chance to demonstrate satisfactory academic performance. Therefore, he or she may apply for readmission to be effective at the conclusion of the specified period of recess. The student may be required to submit a report of activities during the period of recess. The report may be used as one kind of evidence regarding readiness to return. If the student has attended another institution while on recess, he or she must submit an official transcript and have earned at least a 2.00 grade–point average (GPA), or its equivalent, to be considered for readmission.

 


After Academic Dismissal

Academic dismissal does not imply future readmission nor does it mean that the person is forever barred from enrollment at Michigan State University. After a period of at least two years, a student dismissed for academic reasons may apply for readmission.  The applicant must be prepared to submit evidence of growth in maturity and responsibility indicative of capacity to perform university-level work. Declarations of good intentions are not sufficient. Each application will be considered on its merits. If the student has attended another institution while on dismissal, he or she must submit an official transcript to be considered for readmission.

For additional information, see Readmission Procedure in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog.

 


Graduation Requirements


Graduation Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree

To be recommended for a bachelor's degree, a student must:

  1. Complete one year's work, normally the year of graduation, earning at least 30 credits in courses given by Michigan State University. A senior who has earned sufficient credits from this University and met the minimum requirements as stated below, through prior arrangement with the associate dean of the college and the registrar, may be permitted to transfer not to exceed 10 of the last 30 credits from an accredited four–year college or university of comparable academic quality.
  2. Earn at least 27 credits on the East Lansing campus or at approved Michigan State University instructional sites after reaching junior standing.
  3. Complete at least 20 credits at Michigan State University while enrolled in the major in the college in which the degree is to be earned.
  4. Remove any deficiencies identified by Michigan State University placement test scores, as described in the Academic Placement Tests and Remedial–Developmental–Preparatory Courses sections.
  5. Complete the university mathematics requirement, as described below.
  6. Complete the university writing requirement, as described below.
  7. Complete the university Integrative Studies requirement, as described below.
  8. Complete satisfactorily an approved program of study in a college.
  9. Complete a minimum of 120 credits with at least a 2.00 grade–point average. Note that certain programs require more than 120 credits. See program degree requirements for specific totals.

Note: A maximum of 6 credits in English as a Second Language (ESL) 220, 221, 222 or 223 may count towards the 120-credit minimum.

Note: Fulfillment of Requirement 1. (above) by active-duty service members of the U.S. Armed Forces may occur any time they are enrolled.  At least 30 credits or no more than twenty-five percent of the degree requirements for the undergraduate degree must be earned in courses given by Michigan State University. Reservist and National Guardsmen on active-duty are covered in the same manner.

 


Mathematics Requirement (Effective Fall 2017)

The university Mathematics requirement ensures that all students build a foundation of quantitative literacy.  Each student must complete the university Mathematics requirement by fulfilling one of the options below:

  1. Complete two of the following courses:
    1. Mathematics 101, 102, or 103.
  2. Complete both of the following:
    1. Mathematics 103; and
    2. One of the following courses: Mathematics 112, 114, 124, 132, 152H, or 201; or Statistics and Probability 200 or 201. Students who place into any course in 2.b. via the Mathematics Placement Exam need only complete the course in 2.b. in order to fulfill the University Mathematics requirement. 
  3. Complete one of the following:
    1. Mathematics 110 or 116.
  4. Waiver through a proctored Mathematics Placement Exam yielding a score resulting in placement in Mathematics 132 (calculus). For additional information, refer to the statement on Academic Placement Tests – Mathematics (Algebra) in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog.

Students who transfer one of the following: Mathematics 112, 114, or 201; or Statistics and Probability 200 or 201 alone, with no other mathematics course above the level of MTH 1825, must take the Mathematics Placement Exam. Based on the score achieved, additional course work may be required to fulfill the university Mathematics requirement.

 

Incoming freshmen who have taken a College Board Advanced Placement Examination in Mathematics should consult the statement on Academic Placement Tests. Transfer students should consult the statement on Transfer Student Admission.

 

For students who are enrolled in Lyman Briggs College, the completion of Lyman Briggs 118 satisfies the university Mathematics requirement.

 


Writing Requirement

Each student must complete the university's writing program requirements as follows:

  1. The Tier I writing requirement that consists of either a. or b. below. (Effective Fall 2016)
    1. one of the following 4-credit Tier I writing courses during the first year: Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures 101 or 195H; or
    2. the developmental writing courses: Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures 0102 and 1004 and one 4-credit Tier I writing course during the first year. 
  2. Based on the English placement mechanism, a student may be  required to complete the developmental writing courses prior to enrolling in a Tier I writing course.  The developmental writing courses are administered by the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures.  For additional information, refer to the statement on Academic Placement Tests.
  3. New freshmen who have taken the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in English should consult the statement on Academic Placement Tests. Transfer students should consult the statement on Transfer Student Admission.
  4. For students who are enrolled in James Madison College, the completion of James Madison College 111 or 112 satisfies the university Tier I writing requirement.

    For students who are enrolled in Lyman Briggs College, the completion of Lyman Briggs 133 satisfies the university Tier I writing requirement.

    For students who are enrolled in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities, the completion of Residential College in the Arts and Humanities 111 satisfies the university Tier I writing requirement.
  5. The Tier II writing requirement for the student's academic major and degree program.  This requirement involves writing in the student's discipline and is met by completing either:
    1. one or more 300–400 level Tier II writing courses as specified for the student's academic major and degree program, or
    2. a cluster of 300–400 level courses that involve writing experiences and that are approved as the Tier II writing requirement for the student's academic major and degree program.


Integrative Studies

Integrative Studies is an important component of Michigan State University’s unique approach to liberal general education, offering a core curriculum  that complements specialized work by students in their majors.  Integrative Studies courses integrate multiple ways of knowing and modes of inquiry and introduce students to important ways of thinking in the three core knowledge areas: the Arts and Humanities, the Biological  and Physical Sciences, and the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences. They assist students during their study to develop as more critical thinkers.  They also encourage appreciation of our humanity and creativity,  human cultural diversity, the power of knowledge, and our responsibilities for ourselves and for our world.

Courses in Michigan State University’s Integrative Studies Program are aimed at developing intellectual abilities, including critical thinking and interpretive skills.  They help increase knowledge about other times, places, and cultures, key ideas and issues in human experience, and the scientific method and its usefulness in understanding the natural and social worlds.  They are expected to enhance appreciation of the role of knowledge, and of values and ethics, in understanding human behavior and solving social problems.  Finally, they help students recognize responsibilities and opportunities associated with democratic citizenship and with living in an increasingly interconnected, interdependent world.

The Center for Integrative Studies in the Arts and Humanities in the College of Arts and Letters has primary responsibility for the Arts and Humanities area of Integrative Studies at Michigan State University.

The Center for Integrative Studies in General Sciences in the College of Natural Sciences has primary responsibility for Integrative Studies courses in the Biological and Physical Sciences at Michigan State University.

The Center for Integrative Studies in the Social Sciences in the College of Social Science has primary responsibility for Integrative Studies courses in the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences at Michigan State University.

 


Requirements for the Integrative Studies Program

The completion of a minimum of 24 credits in Integrative Studies is required for each student. 

Each student must earn at least the specified number of Integrative Studies credits in each of the following three areas:  Arts and Humanities (8 credits); Biological and Physical Sciences (8 credits); and Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (8 credits).

  1. In the Arts and Humanities area, students must complete one IAH course numbered below 211 and one other IAH course numbered 211 or higher. Completion of the Tier I writing requirement is the prerequisite for any IAH course below 211. Any IAH course below 211 serves as the prerequisite for any IAH course numbered 211 or higher.
  2. In the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences area, students must complete a sequence of two courses:  one 200–level course and one 300–level course. The 200–level course is the prerequisite for the 300–level course.
  3. In the Biological and Physical Sciences area, each student must complete 8 credits.  The 8 credits consist of 3 credits in Biological Sciences, 3 credits in Physical Sciences, and a 2–credit laboratory experience, taken concurrently with one of the courses. Completion of a defined level of mathematics is a prerequisite for courses in both the biological and physical sciences.

    3.1. The Biological and Physical Sciences requirement may be met by alternative courses approved for specific academic major and degree programs for students enrolled in those programs.

    3.2. A student who changes from a major having approved alternative courses in Biological and Physical Sciences to a major which requires the regular Integrative Studies sequence will be given credit for the alternative courses already completed.

Many of the courses in the Arts and Humanities area and in the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences area, emphasize national diversity (designated "N" at the end of the course title), or international and multicultural diversity (designated "I" at the end of the course title).  Some courses emphasize both national diversity, and international and multicultural diversity (designated "D" at the end of the course title).  Students must include at least one "N" course and one "I"  course in their Integrative Studies programs.  A "D" course may meet either an "N" or an "I" requirement, but not both.


Dual Enrollment


Undergraduate and Graduate

For information, refer to the Dual Enrollment by Undergraduates statement in the Graduate Education section of this catalog. 

 


Additional Major

With the permission of the relevant department and college, a student who is enrolled in or has completed a Michigan State University bachelor's degree program may elect to complete the requirements for an additional major. An additional major may be completed within the number of credits required for the student's bachelor's degree program or with only such additional credits necessary to satisfy the requirements for the additional major. The additional major consists of the specified requirements of the major and, where required, of the college.

A student who is interested in completing an additional major should contact the department that administers the intended additional major. The department requests the additional major from the college to update the student's record.

The completion of the additional major will be noted on the student's final transcript. Only the primary major of the student's bachelor's degree program will be designated on the student's diploma.

 


Time Limit for Completing a Bachelor's Degree

There is no time limit for the completion of the bachelor's degree.  For students who have been admitted to a major, progress toward the degree shall be evaluated on an individual basis after an assessment of the student's academic record and degree requirements. The student shall be informed of the remaining requirements for graduation at the time of admission or readmission to the major and encouraged to complete his or her degree.

Requirements for a major or degree program may be updated through the appropriate university processes.  Changes in a major or degree program shall be implemented in a manner which will not delay the graduation date or significantly alter the program of a currently enrolled student who is making normal progress toward the degree. Michigan State University must reserve the right to modify or eliminate programs that are described in this publication. In the event such an action is taken, students affected will be advised by their units of the options available to them to complete their degrees. Every reasonable effort will be made to permit students to complete these programs or similar programs.

 


Requirements for a Second Bachelor's Degree

To pursue a second bachelor's degree, a student must be admitted to the second bachelor's degree program. To be granted a second bachelor's degree, a student must earn at least 30 credits in residence in addition to the credits required for the first degree and meet the specified requirements of the second college and  major. A student who completes the requirements for a second bachelor's degree will receive two diplomas, one for each major.

 


Scholastic Honors

Information on scholarships for students is available through the Michigan State University Web site www.admissions.msu.edu/Undergraduate_Scholarships.asp.

 


Dean's List

The Dean's List honors all undergraduates in the university who earn a 3.50 or better grade–point average (GPA) for the courses in their undergraduate program totaling 12 or more credits for a given semester. The courses must be taken as part of the undergraduate program to be recognized as part of the semester total GPA, and not taken to fulfill the requirements of a graduate or professional degree program. The credits for a given semester must have been recorded under the numerical grading system. The Dean's List designation appears on the student's official transcript. The list, prepared each semester, is displayed in the MSU Union Building and is also available at www.reg.msu.edu/ROInfo/GradHonor/DeansList.aspx.

 


College Honors Awards

Several of the colleges present students with awards at special occasions such as honors banquets or award receptions.

 


Awards and Prizes

A variety of awards and prizes in recognition of special talents and achievement are available.

 


Graduation Honors

Honors College students, students who complete the Academic Scholars program within the Honors College, students who graduate with honor or high honor, and Board of Trustees Award recipients are recognized in the commencement program and at the commencement exercise.

 


Graduation with Honor

The policy for granting graduation with honor as established by the University Academic Council provides for honoring at each commencement the top 20 percent of the graduating undergraduate students based upon their grade-point averages. Approximately six percent receive the degree With High Honor and approximately 14 percent receive the degree With Honor.

The current minimum grade–point averages to receive graduation honors can be found on the Office of the Registrar Web site at https://reg.msu.edu/ROInfo/GradHonor/GraduationHonors.aspx.

The specific minimum grade–point averages required for honors are determined by the Office of the Provost following a review of the standards by the University Committee on Undergraduate Education. The grade–point distributions of each year's Spring graduates are used for establishing new grade–point average standards for the following consecutive Spring, Summer, and Fall graduating classes.

Graduation with honor is based on the entire academic performance at Michigan State University. However, recognition of graduation with honor in the commencement program is based on the grade–point average of all work at Michigan State University completed prior to the opening of the semester of graduation. Transfer students must earn a minimum of 50 semester credits at Michigan State University to be eligible for graduation with honor or recognition in the commencement program. Graduation with honor is indicated on the student's permanent academic record and on the diploma. Lists are also released to the press with appropriate designations.


Board of Trustees Awards

Awards are made at Fall and Spring commencements to the six or more graduating seniors who achieved the highest cumulative scholarly records by the close of the preceding semester.  At least three–fourths of the credits for the degree must be earned at Michigan State University with numerical grades by the close of the preceding semester. Fall, Spring, and Summer graduating seniors are eligible. The President of the University acts on behalf of the Board in determining the recipients of the awards.

Summer Board of Trustees Award recipients, please contact the commencement office at acadevnt@msu.edu if you plan to participate in the December commencement ceremony.

 


Academic Apparel at Commencement

At the commencement exercises, candidates graduating from the Honors College wear a white stole with the initials, HC. Candidates graduating With Honor or With High Honor wear a gold braid.

 


Financial Aid for Undergraduates

A comprehensive and coordinated program of financial aid to assist qualified students is available to Michigan State University undergraduates in the form of scholarships, educational grants, loans, and jobs.

Applications for financial aid are available on the web at www.fafsa.gov. Results of the application, known as the FAFSA, are sent electronically to the MSU Office of Financial Aid for processing.

When a FAFSA is received and the extent of the financial need is determined, the student is considered for any of the scholarships, grants, and loans for which he or she is eligible. The financial aid package is prepared to assist in meeting the financial need of the student. This package may include any combination of scholarship, grant, loan, or job. Career Services, 113 Student Services Building, www.careernetwork.msu.edu, assists students in procuring jobs.

Most of the educational grants require that financial need be demonstrated. Many of the scholarships and grants are limited to Michigan residents.

Students may obtain information about applying for aid at the Office of Financial Aid, 252 Student Services Building.


Federal Aid and Satisfactory Progress Toward the Bachelor's Degree

Federal aid regulations limit the amount of time federal financial aid recipients can work toward a bachelor's degree and require measured progress toward that degree.

  1. Students who have completed the requirements for an undergraduate degree are no longer eligible for federal grant funds once the degree requirements have been met, regardless of whether the student seeks conferral of the degree.
  2. Students who have exceeded the maximum time frame to complete the degree as described below are no longer eligible for any federal, state, or institutional need-based funds or any federal loans funds.

Undergraduate students seeking their first bachelor's degree are allowed to earn 150% of the number of credits required for the degree. Most bachelor's degrees require 120 credits. In this case, students enrolling in a semester after earning their 180th credit are no longer considered to be making Satisfactory Progress toward the degree.

Many Certificates in Agriculture Technology and Certificates in Veterinary Technology require 60 credits. For these programs, the 150% limit would be 90 credits.

Credits completed at all post-secondary institutions are counted in the total, whether or not Michigan State University has accepted these credits in transfer and whether or not the student received aid for them.

Students are expected to complete 67% of the credits taken during their time of attendance. Completed credits are those credits in which the student remains enrolled throughout the term of instruction for each course and for which the student receives a numerical, CR-NC, P-N, or V-Visitor grade.

 


Federal Aid and Required GPA

Federal regulations require that students must maintain a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) sufficient to meet university graduation requirements. This is a minimum GPA of 2.00 for undergraduate students.


Federal Financial Aid Probation and Denial

Students who fail to meet any of the above requirements are notified by the Office of Financial Aid regarding their federal-aid eligibility status. The notification will outline the appeal process for students with extenuating circumstances.

There are four kinds of federal-aid eligibility status:

  1. Federal-aid regular status applies to students who complete 67% of their MSU assessed credits, are within the 150% maximum credit limit and have the minimum required GPA.
  2. Federal-aid warning applies to students who have failed the 67% completion rule and/or who have fallen below the minimum cumulative GPA in the semester. This is a one-semester grace period. Students are eligible for federal aid while in this status.  
  3. Federal-aid denial applies to students who have failed the 67% completion rule for two consecutive measurement periods, have failed to regain the minimum cumulative GPA standards after one semester of probation, and/or have exceeded the 150% maximum credit limit. In all cases, the denial will apply unless the student submits a successful appeal or regains good standing by fulfilling the requirements.
  4. Federal-aid probation applies when a student has submitted a successful appeal, for the duration of the approved appeal. 

A student who fails the 67% completion standard for the first time will be placed on federal-aid warning for the next measurement period. A student already on federal-aid warning who fails the 67% completion standard for a second time will be placed on federal-aid denial. Students who are on federal-aid denial  or who are on federal-aid warning who pass the 67% completion requirement will be restored to federal-aid regular status if they have not failed another Satisfactory Academic Progress requirement.

Students who are unable to complete a bachelor's degree within 150% of the required credits for the degree are ineligible for federal financial aid and are placed on federal-aid denial beginning with the semester following the one in which they enrolled in their last credit. A reminder regarding the credit maximum and extension requests will be sent to students at least one semester before they attempt their final allowed credit. A student granted an extension will be placed on federal aid probation.

Students with a cumulative GPA below 2.00 are placed on warning for one semester. If the cumulative GPA is still below 2.00 at the end of the next term of enrollment, the student is denied aid until the required 2.00 cumulative GPA is earned.

 


Academic Impacts on Pell Grant

The Department of Education requires institutions to verify that credits used to determine the Pell grant award amount must exclude credits for a failed class if we cannot verify that the student actually earned the failing grade. The student is deemed to have earned the 0.0 grade if he or she attended the class at least one day after the census date (end of refund period) of the class. Students who never attended or whose last date of attendance was before the census date are considered to have an unearned 0.0 and Pell disbursements are adjusted based upon the new (earned) credits.

 


Student Loans


University Short-Term Loan Program

The Short–Term Loan Program at Michigan State University is designed to help students meet emergency situations and should not be regarded as a means of financing a college education.

 


Federal Perkins Student Loan Program

This low-interest loan program was established by the federal government in an agreement with Michigan State University. All awards are based upon the availability of funds.

Loans must be used for legitimate educational purposes such as room, board, tuition, and books. Eligibility is determined by a uniform method of needs analysis through the submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Automatic consideration is given to financial aid applicants who demonstrate financial need. Students must normally be enrolled on a full–time basis to receive a loan.

 


Federal Subsidized Stafford (Direct) Loan

The Federal Subsidized Stafford (Direct) Loan is based on demonstrated need. While the student is enrolled at least half time, payment on the principle is deferred and the federal government pays interest.  Interest will begin to accrue when a borrower enters repayment. Interest rates vary annually. The rate for 2016-17 is 3.76%.

Completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is required for participation in the Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan Program.

Annual maximums for subsidized Federal Stafford Loans are:

Freshman $3,500
Sophomore $4,500
Junior/Senior $5,500
 


Federal Unsubsidized Stafford (Direct) Loan

The Federal Unsubsidized Stafford (Direct) Loan is not based on need. Payment on the principal is deferred while the student borrower is enrolled at least half time. Interest is paid by the student borrower through quarterly payments, or if a student desires it can be added daily to the principal, to be repaid when the student ceases to be enrolled. Interest rates vary annually. The rate for 2016-17 is 3.76%.

Completion of the FAFSA is required for participation in the Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan program.

Annual maximums for the Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are:

Dependent Freshman $5,500
Dependent Sophomore $6,500
Dependent Junior/Senior $7,500
Independent Freshman $9,500
Independent Sophomore $10,500
Independent Junior/Senior  $12,500

Note that the maximums include both subsidized and unsubsidized
loans. For example, an independent freshman who receives a $3,500
subsidized loan can borrow no more than $6,000 in unsubsidized loan.

Lifetime loan limits for all Stafford Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans are:

Dependent undergraduate $31,000
Independent undergraduate $57,500


Federal PLUS Loan

The Federal PLUS Loan Program (Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students) is for parents of dependent undergraduate students. A credit check is required and will be conducted by the loan servicer. The maximum amount that can be borrowed is the lesser of the cost of education or the difference between the cost of education and any outside resources and/or financial aid received. Interest rates vary annually. The rate for 2016-17 is 6.31%. Repayment begins 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed. Completion of the FAFSA is required for participation in the PLUS Program.


Student Employment

The Student Employment Office provides resources for students seeking part–time and summer employment opportunities throughout their careers at Michigan State University. Various types of positions are available, both on–campus and off–campus. Students interested in employment after graduation will find assistance through Career Services and Placement.

Students who qualify for financial aid through the federal Work–Study Programs will find job opportunities listed on the Career Services Web site, MySpartanCareer, for jobs located both on–campus and off–campus.

A student who plans to work will need to provide identification and an original Social Security card in order to complete the W–4 and I–9 forms to comply with federal laws. A complete list of acceptable documents and more specific information is available at the Career Services, 113 Student Services Building, 1-517-355-9510.

Besides listing job opportunities, Career Services offers many other services and resources to students during their careers at Michigan State University.  Services include workshops offered throughout the year to aid students in their job searches, resume critiquing, advising about specific aspects of jobs searches and employment, a career–related referral service for paid internships, on–campus interviewing for summer positions, and a summer Employment Fair, held every February.

 


Other State and Federal Programs of Financial Assistance

These programs are not administered directly by Michigan State University. However, the university will on request, certify  students receiving awards under these programs  with the appropriate agency.

Brief descriptions of the programs are given below and additional information can be obtained from the agency indicated or from the Veteran Certification Section, Office of the Registrar, 150 Administration Building.

State of Michigan

Michigan Indian Tuition Waiver

To qualify a student must be certified by the Michigan Department of Civil Rights as a member of a federally recognized tribe, and be a legal resident of the State of Michigan for not less than 12 consecutive months. This program covers only resident  tuition for any postsecondary–level course work, part–time or full–time. Further information concerning qualifications and application procedures is available by contacting the Office of Financial Aid.

Michigan Public Act 245 (as amended)

A person not under 16 and not over 22 years of age who has been a resident of this state for 12 months and who is the child of a Michigan veteran of the armed forces of the United States who was killed in action or died from other causes during a war or war condition in which the United States has been, is, or may hereafter be a participant, or who as a result of wartime service has since died or is totally disabled, or who as a result of war time service was totally disabled before death from any cause or who is officially listed by the United States government as missing in action in a foreign country, may be eligible for educational assistance under this act. Inquiries and application should be made with the Michigan Veterans' Trust Fund, Ottawa Street Building, N. Tower, P. O. Box 30026, Lansing, Michigan 48909.

Police Officer's and Fire Fighter's Survivor Tuition Act
Public Act 195 of 1996

Public Act 195 of 1996 provides for the waiver of tuition at public universities for the surviving spouse and children of Michigan police officers and fire fighters killed in the line of duty. Tuition will be covered for eligible survivors enrolled in an undergraduate degree program. Inquiries and application should be made with the Survivor Tuition Program, Student Scholarships and Grants toll free at 1-888-447-2687.

Michigan Veterans Trust Fund

Temporary assistance granted by the Michigan Veterans Trust Fund (MVTF) for emergencies or hardships is available to eligible wartime veterans, and their families, residing in the state. Additional information is available at www.michigan.gov/ssg.

Michigan Rehabilitation Services

Financial assistance to persons who have a disability that has interfered with or may interfere with the individual's job performance should contact the Michigan Rehabilitation Services, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, Box 30010, Lansing, Michigan 48909 or 1-800-605-6722.

United States Government

Veterans Education Benefits

The Veterans Administration (VA) offers a number of programs to those who have served, as well as to eligible survivors and dependents of veterans. A brief summary of each program is listed below.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill

The Post-9/11 GI Bill provides up to 36 months of education benefits to those who have served on active duty after September 10, 2001. These benefits can be used only at institutions of higher learning within 15 years from the date of last discharge from active duty.

Montgomery GI Bill - Active Duty (Chapter 30)

The MGIB-Active Duty program provides up to 36 months of education benefits to those who have served on active duty.

Montgomery GI Bill - Selected Reserve (Chapter 1606)

The MGIB-Selected Reserve program may be available to members of the Selected Reserve. The Selected Reserve includes the Army Reserve, Navy Reserve, Air Force Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve and Coast Guard Reserve, and the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard.

Reserve Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 1607)

The Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP) is a Department of Defense education benefit program designed to provide educational assistance to members of the Reserve components called or ordered to active duty in response to a war or national emergency (contingency operation) as declared by the President or Congress. This program makes certain reservists who were activated for at least 90 days after September 11, 2001 either eligible for education benefits or eligible for increased benefits.

Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 35)

The Dependents' Educational Assistance Program (DEA) provides education and training opportunities to eligible dependents of veterans who are permanently and totally disabled due to a service-related condition, or who died while on active duty or as a result of a service related condition. The program offers up to 45 months of education benefits.

Veterans’ Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 32)

The Veterans’ Educational Assistance Program (VEAP) is available if those who first entered active duty between January 1, 1977 and June 30, 1985 and elected to make contributions from military pay to participate in this education benefit program. Contributions are matched on a $2 for $1 basis by the U.S. Government.

Tutorial Assistance for Persons Receiving Veterans Educational Allowances

Eligible persons may receive up to $100 a month up to a maximum of $1,200 for special tutoring if deficient in a course or courses.

Department of Veterans Affairs Work–Study Allowance

Eligible veterans may apply directly with the Department of Veterans Affairs for the VA Work–Study Program.
Students approved for educational assistance allowances should contact a VA Certifying Official, Office of the Registrar, 150 Administration Building.