Academic Programs Catalog

Undergraduate Education

Academic Orientation and Transitions

Remedial-Developmental-Preparatory Courses

The policy governing remedial–developmental–preparatory types of courses was established to protect the academic standards of Michigan State University undergraduate degrees while at the same time reinforcing the university's commitment to assist students in remedying their academic deficiencies in fundamental skill areas. The policy serves to motivate students to overcome their deficiencies while ensuring that all students complete a minimum of 120 credits of college level work as a condition of graduation.

Remedial-developmental-preparatory course numbers are four digits, rather than the three digits used for all other courses. The fourth or last digit identifies the type of remedial-developmental-preparatory course. For example, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures 1004 is a Type 4 course.

There are five types of remedial-developmental-preparatory courses.

Type 1:
Single courses designed to remedy deficiencies identified by Michigan State University placement test scores. The removal of any such deficiencies, either by one retest or by passing the course, is required as a condition for graduation.

Credits earned are included in all university computations except the total number required for graduation.

Type 2:
Course sequences designed to remedy deficiencies identified by Michigan State University placement test scores. The removal of any such deficiencies, either by one retest or by passing the courses, is required as a condition for graduation. More than the usual number of contact hours may be required.

Credits earned are included in all university computations except the total number required for graduation.

Type 3:
Courses designed to remedy deficiencies identified by Michigan State University placement test scores. The removal of such deficiencies, either by one retest or by passing the course, is required only as a condition for entry into some degree programs, and is required as a condition for graduation only for students in those programs.  More than the usual number of contact hours may be required.

Credits earned are included in all university computations and are included in the total number required for graduation.

Type 4:
Courses that students place into because of inadequate scores on Michigan State University placement tests that identify relevant skill deficiencies, although they do not measure knowledge in the course material. The removal of skill deficiencies is not part of the course objectives. It is expected that students will be enrolled concurrently in Type I and/or Type II and/or Type III courses for purposes of remedying those deficiencies. More than the usual number of contact hours may be required. 

Credits earned are included in all university computations and are included in the total number required for graduation.

Type 5:
Courses that may be required by departments or colleges for some students. The course may be designed either to prepare the student to handle the subject matter of a required entry level college course, or to improve his or her study skills or ability to make productive use of university offerings in general. More than the usual number of contact hours may be required.

Credits earned are included in all University computations except the total required for graduation.

Remedial–developmental–preparatory courses may not carry numbers above the 100 level and may not be offered under variable content numbers.

The removal of academic deficiencies, which would preclude graduation from Michigan State University, should have the highest priority in student program planning. Drops from Type I and Type II courses should not normally be processed except to facilitate transfer between sections. If a course overload requires that a student drop one or more courses in a specific semester, courses in the regular program of studies shall be dropped in preference to those designed to remove deficiencies.

The University Committee on Curriculum controls the number of  remedial-developmental–preparatory courses and assures conformity of such courses with existing policy. Upon recommendation by the University Committee on Curriculum, the Faculty Senate approves remedial–developmental–preparatory courses by type.