Academic Programs Catalog

College of Social Science

Department of Human Development and Family Studies

Amy Bonomi, Chairperson

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies is committed to improving the health and well-being of individuals and families across the lifespan through research and preparation of graduates for research, teaching, and professional practice.  Recognizing, understanding and addressing the central role of diversity and interdependence among families and communities in the process of human development are core values of the department.

Areas of study include child development, youth development, lifespan human development, family diversity and couple and family therapy.  Knowledge of basic research and the application of research to improving the lives of individuals in the context of the family, the community, and policy are emphasized.  Practical experiences in real-world settings are incorporated into all areas of study.  The Child Development Laboratory and the Couple and Family Therapy Clinic are part of the department.

At the undergraduate level, the focus is on the application of knowledge about individual development and family processes to early childhood education, child and youth services in the community, and services for adults.  At the graduate level, this focus is widened to include courses and research experiences with the goal of improving the training of early childhood teachers, preparing professionals who will serve youth in a variety of contexts, and training therapists who provide services to families, couples, and individuals. The department graduate programs also prepare scholars who study child development in the context of family processes, diverse families and family problems, and the process and outcome of therapeutic interventions.


Undergraduate Programs


Child Development - Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Child Development degree program combines a basic education in child development and family studies with a broad general education and preparation related to employment in early childhood education settings. Students will choose either a concentration in Elementary Education Teacher Certification, which requires admission to the teacher preparation program, or a concentration in Preschool Teaching in an Early Childhood Setting.

Elementary Education Teacher Certification course work prepares graduates to work in the early grades of primary schools, kindergarten through third grade and to meet the requirements to earn an Elementary Education Teaching Certificate (kindergarten through fifth grade) with an Early Childhood General and Special Education Endorsement.

The Preschool Teaching in an Early Childhood Setting concentration prepares graduates to work in early childhood settings such as Head Start and preschools and in other child-related fields such as policy, health care, or administration. Students in the Preschool Teaching in an Early Childhood Setting concentration will be required to complete an independent study experience such as study abroad, study away, experiential learning, internship, or undergraduate research.  The child development major is appropriate for students interested in working with young children, birth through age eight.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Child Development

  1. The University requirements for bachelor's degrees as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Arts degree in Child Development. Students pursuing the Elementary Education Teacher Certification concentration will be required to complete more than 120 credits.

    The University's Tier II writing requirement for the Child Development major is met by completing Human Development and Family Studies 321.  This course is referenced in item 3. a. below.
  2. The requirements of the College of Social Science for the Bachelor of Arts degree except for students pursuing the Elementary Education Teacher Certification concentration.
  3. The following requirements for the major:
                 
  a. All of the following courses (26 credits):  
    CEP 240 Diverse Learners in Multicultural Perspective 3
    HDFS 211 Child Growth and Development 3
    HDFS 320 Interaction with Children in Groups 3
    HDFS 320L Interaction with Children – Laboratory 1
    HDFS 321 Curriculum for Children (W) 3
    HDFS 321L Curriculum for Children – Laboratory 1
    HDFS 322 Infant Development and Program Planning 3
    HDFS 421 Assessment of the Young Child 3
    HDFS 424 Student Teaching in an Early Childhood Program 6
  b. One of the following concentrations:  
    Elementary Education Teacher Certification  
    Completion of an Integrated Teaching Major in Integrated Science, Language Arts, Mathematics,or  Social Studies. For additional information, refer to the statement on TEACHER CERTIFICATION in the Department of Teacher Education section of this catalog.  
    Preschool Teaching in an Early Childhood Setting  
    1. All of the following courses (15 credits):  
      HDFS 145 The Individual, Marriage and the Family 3
      HDFS 414 Parenting 3
      HDFS 442 Ethnic Families in America 3
      HDFS 472 Evaluation of Human Service Programs 3
      HDFS 473 Administration of Early Childhood Programs 3
    2. One of the following courses (1 to 3 credits):  
      Students must seek advisor approval prior to enrolling in one of these courses.  
      HDFS 490 Independent Study 1 to 3
      HDFS 497 Topics in Human Development and Family Studies 1 to 3
      SSC 490 Special Topics in Social Science 1 to 3

Early Care and Education

The Bachelor of Arts in Early Care and Education, is a collaborative, multi-institutional limited enrollment program. This degree focuses on the intellectual, social, emotional, and biological development of children. It includes planning and design of related human services and care/educational settings and preparation related to employment in early childhood education settings. The program provides instruction in parent-child relations, parenting practices, special needs of children, parental and environmental influences on child development, caregiver-child interactions, external support services, and related public policy issues. Designed for active duty military, spouses, retired and Department of Defense employees, rural head start teachers and off-campus students, the program provides flexibility for working professionals who need to maintain employment while advancing their educational opportunity.

The College of Social Science, in collaboration with The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA), offers this program by faculty from multiple land-grant universities: Michigan State University, Iowa State University, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska, Oklahoma State University, South Dakota State University, and Texas Tech University.

Students will earn this degree from their home institution while also enrolling for courses at other participating institutions.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the University and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be admitted, students must apply via their home institution and plan their course of study under the guidance of their academic advisor. Michigan State University students follow established University admission procedures to the College of Social Science and the Early Care and Education major. Students must have a minimum of 30 credits applicable to the graduation requirements of the admitting institution with an earned minimum grade-point average of 2.5.

Michigan State University students should contact the Department of Human Development and Family Studies for guidance on the completion of this program.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Early Care and Education

  1. The University requirements for the bachelor’s degree as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Arts degree in Early Care and Education.

    The University’s Tier II writing requirement for the Early Care and Education major is met by completing Human Development and Family Studies 406.
  2. The requirements of the College of Social Science.
  3. The following requirements for the major:
    1. All of the following courses which are taught online as part of the Great Plains IDEA Alliance (51 credits):
Child Development (ages 0-3)
Child Development (ages 4-8)
Professional Development in Early Care and Education
Child Guidance and Classroom Environments
Health, Safety and Nutrition in Early Care and Education
Practicum I: Child Observations in Classroom Environments
Development of Curriculum for Children (ages 0-3)
Development of Curriculum for Children (ages 4-8)
Assessment and Observations in Early Care and Education
Understanding and Adapting for Developmental Differences in Early Care and Education
Practicum II: Lesson Planning
Working with Families in Early Care and Education
Technology and Young Children
Diversity in the Lives of Young Children and Their Families
Administration and Supervision in Early Childhood Settings
Practicum III: Capstone Experience (W) [HDFS 406]

Students must have access to a high-quality preschool or head start classroom for their three practicum experiences.


Human Development and Family Studies - Bachelor of Arts

Graduates will be committed to improving the health and well-being of diverse individuals and families across the lifespan through research, teaching, and professional practice. Recognizing, understanding and addressing the central role of diversity and interdependence among families and communities is a core value of graduates. Students gain knowledge of basic research and the application of research to improving the lives of individuals in the context of the family, the community, and policy. Practical experience in real-world settings is incorporated into the degree program.  Students are prepared to work in community and governmental agencies and organizations that provide human services within changing societies and serve children, youth, and families. Upon graduation, students may apply for provisional certification as a Family Life Educator and with additional work experience they can earn full certification.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Human Development and Family Studies

  1. The University requirements for the bachelor’s degree as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Arts degree in Human Development and Family Studies.

    The University’s Tier II writing requirement for the Human Development and Family Studies major is met by completing Human Development and Family Studies 345. This course is referenced in item 3. below.
  2. The requirements of the College of Social Science for the Bachelor of Arts degree.
  3. The following requirements for the major.
                   
    a. All of the following courses (46 credits):  
      HDFS 145

    The Individual, Marriage, and the Family

    3

      HDFS 225 Lifespan Human Development in the Family

    3

      HDFS 270 Introduction to Human Development and Family Studies

    4

      HDFS 345 Principles of Family Studies (W)

    3

      HDFS 414 Parenting  

    3

      HDFS 442 Ethnic Families in America

    3

      HDFS 444 Interpersonal Relationships in the Family

    3

      HDFS 445 Human Sexuality

    3

      HDFS 447 Management of Human Service Programs

    3

      HDFS 448 Child and Family Policy

    3

      HDFS 454 Family Financial Management

    3

      HDFS 472 Evaluation of Human Service Programs

    3

      HDFS 481 Research and Quantitative Methods in Human 3
            Development and Family Studies  
      HDFS 493 Internship   6

 


Human Development and Family Studies - Bachelor of Science

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Human Development and Family Studies

  1. The University requirements for the bachelor’s degree as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies.

    The University’s Tier II writing requirement for the Human Development and Family Studies major is met by completing Human Development and Family Studies 345. This course is referenced in item 3. below.
  2. The requirements of the College of Social Science for the Bachelor of Science degree.
  3. The following requirements for the major.
                   
    a. All of the following courses (46 credits):  
      HDFS 145 The Individual, Marriage, and the Family

    3

      HDFS 225 Lifespan Human Development in the Family

    3

      HDFS 270 Introduction to Human Development and Family Studies

    4

      HDFS 345 Principles of Family Studies (W)

    3

      HDFS 414 Parenting  

    3

      HDFS 442 Ethnic Families in America

    3

      HDFS 444 Interpersonal Relationships in the Family

    3

      HDFS 445 Human Sexuality

    3

      HDFS 447 Management of Human Service Programs

    3

      HDFS 448 Child and Family Policy

    3

      HDFS 454 Family Financial Management

    3

      HDFS 472 Evaluation of Human Service Programs

    3

      HDFS 481 Research and Quantitative Methods in Human 3
            Development and Family Studies  
      HDFS 493 Internship   6

     


     


Minor in Youth and Society

The Minor in Youth and Society, administered by the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, is an enhanced interdisciplinary program of study designed to assist students in understanding the development of youth in societies globally, with particular attention to the dynamic interaction of youth, their families, and the societies in which they live.

The minor is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs in the College of Social Science. With the approval of the department and college that administer the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

Students who plan to complete the requirements of the minor should consult their major undergraduate advisor in the College of Social Science.

Requirements for the Minor in Youth and Society

Complete 15 credits from the following:

1. The following course (3 credits):
HDFS 212 Children, Youth and Family 3
2. One of the following courses (3 credits):
CJ 220 Criminology 3
HST 250 History and Technology of the Digital Age 3
HST 413 Families in Historical Perspective 3
PSY 444 Developmental Psychology: Adolescence through Youth (W) 3
SOC 316 Youth and Society 3
SW 471 Child Welfare 3
SW 475 School Violence: Causes and Interventions 3
3. Two of the following courses (6 credits):
CEP 261 Substance Abuse 3
COM 225 An Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3
COM 275 Effects of Mass Communication 3
CSUS 445 Community-Based Environmental and Sustainability Education 3
EAD 361 Educational Reform and Policy Analysis 3
HNF 150 Introduction to Human Nutrition 3
TE 353 International Education 3
4. The following capstone course (3 credits):
HDFS 412 Ecological Perspective of Adolescents 3



 

Teacher Certification Options

The child development disciplinary major leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree is available for teacher certification.
A early childhood-general and special education disciplinary minor is available for students pursuing elementary teacher certification.

Students who elect the child development disciplinary major or the early childhood-general and special education disciplinary minor must contact the Department of Human Development and Family Studies.

For additional information, refer to the statement on TEACHER CERTIFICATION in the Department of Teacher Education section of this catalog.


Graduate Study

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies is concerned with human development and with the interaction of individuals and family members throughout the life cycle as they interact with their environment. The department offers the following degree programs:

Graduate Certificate
   
Youth Development Specialist
    Youth Program Management and Evaluation
Master of Arts
    Family Community Services
    Youth Development
Master of Science
    Child Development
    Human Development and Family Studies
Doctor of Philosophy
    Human Development and Family Studies

All graduate programs in the department are designed to develop professional competence, to encourage creative thinking, and to prepare students to perform and utilize research. Each student's program is developed within the framework of the area of major interest, taking into consideration his or her professional experience, interests, and educational and career goals.

Careers to which advanced degrees may lead include college teaching, research, extension, marriage and family therapy, and administration in early childhood education centers. Graduates also may be employed as family specialists in community and family agencies.

Opportunities are available within the Department of Human Development and Family Studies for graduate students to participate in ongoing interdisciplinary research and in field experiences in school or community settings. The Child Development Laboratories and the Couple and Family Therapy Clinic provide opportunities for applied and research experiences.

Students who are enrolled in Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies may elect specializations in Infancy and Early Childhood. For additional information, refer to the statement on Interdepartmental Graduate Specializations in Infancy and Early Childhood in the College of Social Science section of this catalog.

Master of Arts and Master of Science

In addition to meeting the requirements of the University and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Students with limited undergraduate backgrounds may be required to correct such deficiencies by completing courses which serve as prerequisites to graduate work.



Child Development - Master of Science

This program focuses on the behavioral, psychological, biological and contextual processes that promote positive developmental outcomes in infants and young children.  Key contexts of development emphasized in the program include family, early childhood educational settings, and culture.  Courses are available in areas such as development across cultures, infant development, language and literacy research and practices, social-emotional development, observational methods for home or classroom, approaches to early education, intervention and prevention programs, and parenting. Laboratory experiences in early childhood education are available in the Child Development Laboratories, and research experiences are available through work with faculty mentors.


Family Community Services - Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in Family Community Services, is a collaborative, multi-institutional program offered totally online. This degree is designed to provide a research-based perspective to understand individual, family, interpersonal and community dynamics across the lifespan. Students will acquire knowledge and skills related to the design, implementation, sustainability, and leadership and management of family and community services programs.

The College of Social Science, in collaboration with The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA), offers this program with all course work delivered via the Internet/World Wide Web by faculty from multiple land-grant universities: Michigan State University, Kansas State University, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Oklahoma State University, and South Dakota State University.

Students will earn this degree from their home institution while also enrolling for courses at other participating institutions.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the University and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be admitted, students must apply via their home institution and plan their course of study under the guidance of their academic advisor. Michigan State University students follow established University admission procedures.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree in Family Community Services

The program is available only online and only under Plan B (without thesis). Each student’s course of study must be developed and approved in consultation with the academic advisor. The student must complete a total of 36 credits, of which 30 credits is course work required by The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA) consortium, distributed as follows:

  1. Core courses (30 credit hours):
    Administration and Management of Human Services Programs
    Crises Across the Lifespan
    Family Dynamics
    Family Resource Management
    Foundations and Principles of Family and Community Services
    Interpersonal Relationships
    Lifespan Development
    Parenting Education
    Program Design, Evaluation and Implementation
    Resilience in Families
  2. Additional course work (6 credit hours).
    This enrollment will vary at each institution.  At Michigan State University, students will fulfill this requirement by enrolling in course work approved by the student’s academic advisor.
  3. Pass a final oral examination or evaluation. This will include a formal presentation by the student on a topic determined by the student and the academic advisor.

Michigan State University students should contact the Department of Human Development and Family Studies or consult the Michigan State University Schedule of Courses for current course schedule and other information.

 


Youth Development - Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in Youth Development, is a collaborative, multiinstitutional program offered totally online. This degree is designed to promote an understanding of communities and families and to prepare students to have an impact on the development of youth in their homes, neighborhoods, and society. American youth born since the early 1980s are projected to be the largest, most ethnically diverse generation of adolescents in the history of the United States, and this program is designed to address that demographic shift.

The curriculum is focused on the promotion of positive development of all young people. It is designed for individuals who wish to work in a variety of youth-related professions, including youth-serving organizations and programs such as Boys and Girls Clubs, community recreation specialties, youth programs sponsored by faith-based institutions, correctional professions, or within U.S. Extension Programs.

The College of Social Science, in collaboration with The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA), offers this program with all course work delivered via the Internet/World Wide Web by faculty from multiple land-grant universities: Michigan State University, Kansas State University, University of Missouri, North Dakota State University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Nebraska.

Students will earn this degree from their home institution while also enrolling for courses at other participating institutions.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the University and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be admitted, students must apply via their home institution and plan their course of study under the guidance of their academic advisor. Michigan State University students follow established University admission procedures.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree in Youth Development

The program is available only online and only under Plan B (without thesis). Each student’s course of study must be developed and approved in consultation with the academic advisor. Each course is offered at least once every other year. The student must complete a total of 36 credits, of which 28 credits is course work required by The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA) consortium, distributed as follows:

  1. Core courses (28 credit hours):
    Administration and Program Management
    Adolescents and Their Families
    Community Youth Development
    Contemporary Youth Issues
    Foundations of Youth Development
    Program Design, Evaluation, and Implementation
    Youth Development
    Youth in Cultural Contexts
    Youth Policy
    Youth Professionals as Consumers of Research
  2. Additional course work (8 credit hours).
    This enrollment will vary at each institution and may require a master’s thesis, project, or practicum.  At Michigan State University, students will fulfill this requirement by enrolling in course work approved by the student’s academic advisor.
  3. Pass a final examination or evaluation.

Michigan State University students should contact the Department of Human Development and Family Studies or consult the Michigan State University Schedule of Courses for current course schedule and other information.

 


Human Development and Family Studies - Master of Science

The Master of Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies is designed to help students gain an understanding of increasingly diverse family units as well as individual family members as they develop across the life course.  Depending upon student interest and career goals, focus may be on human development (adolescence, aging), leadership, policy or diversity.  Students are prepared to work with and advocate for families, children, youth and adults in a broad range of settings, including extension offices, community agencies, and policy-making contexts.  Both a thesis (Plan A) and non-thesis (Plan B) option are offered.  Those pursuing Plan A are prepared for doctoral study in a variety of related fields. 


Human Development and Family Studies - Doctor of Philosophy

Faculty mentors work closely with doctoral students in experiences related to professional development, theory and conceptual model development, and translational research. Each student completes a professional portfolio during the course of the doctoral program in addition to comprehensive exams and the dissertation.

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Human Development and Family Studies offers four concentrations from which students may choose. They include:

Child Development: focus on behavioral, psychological, biological and contextual processes that promote positive developmental outcomes in infants and young children.

Family Diversity: focus on families in sociocultural context to include attention to gender, ethnicity, racial socialization, immigration, poverty, disability, sexual orientation and aging.

Lifespan Human Development: focus on developmental processes across the life course in the context of family, community, schools and other environments. Study may focus on one life stage (youth, emerging or older adults) or examine an issue (attachment, chronic illness) across the entire life course.

Couple and Family Therapy: focus on the application of research and theory to individual, group, couple and family therapy. Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE).

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

Admission to the doctoral program in human development and family studies is based on evidence of academic ability, research potential, achievement, and maturity. Admission to the program assumes a background in the behavioral sciences; collateral course work that does not count toward the doctoral degree may be required where background is inadequate. A prospective doctoral student is required to take the general sections of the Graduate Record Examination and include the results with the application.

To be admitted to the doctoral program in human development and family studies with couple and family therapy as the area of concentration, an applicant must have completed a master's degree program with a major in marriage and family therapy or its equivalent. Students who select the couple and family therapy concentration must participate in a personal interview with a selected faculty committee. Students who select the couple and family therapy concentration are admitted to the degree program in fall semester only.

Requirements for the Degree

Students in the doctoral program in human development and family studies who select the couple and family therapy concentration are required to complete a supervised clinical internship. The Couple and Family Therapy Program at Michigan State University has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. The re-accreditation period is effective through January 2013.

The inclusion of a foreign language in the doctoral program is at the discretion of the candidate and the guidance committee.


Youth Program Management and Evaluation - Graduate Certificate

The Youth Program Management and Evaluation Graduate Certificate is designed to assist youth professionals to develop and apply resources for successful implementation and management of youth-serving organizations. The program addresses the need for advanced education based on research and policy for optimal youth outcomes through a strengths-based curriculum.

The online format and course schedule of the certificate program allow flexibility to accommodate both full-time students and working professionals. The College of Social Science, in collaboration with The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA), offers this program with all course work delivered via the World Wide Web at www.gpidea.org.

Admission

To be considered for admission into the Youth Program Management and Evaluation Graduate Certificate applicants must follow established University admission procedures. Students currently pursuing the Master of Arts in Youth Development are not eligible to apply for admission to the Youth Program Management and Evaluation Graduate Certificate. For additional information, refer to the Admission section in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.

Requirements for the Youth Program Management and Evaluation Graduate Certificate

The program is available totally online. Each course is offered at least once every other year. The student must complete 13 credits of course work in collaboration with The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA).

  1. The following course (1 credit):
    Foundations of Youth Development
  2. Four of the following courses (12 credits):
    Administration and Program Management
    Contemporary Youth Issues
    Program Design, Evaluation and Implementation
    Youth Policy
    Youth Professionals as Consumers of Research

 


Youth Development Specialist - Graduate Certificate

The Youth Development Specialist Graduate Certificate is designed to assist youth professionals to train individuals in the second decade of life with the skills necessary for a successful transition into adulthood. The program addresses the need for advanced education in youth issues and does so through a strengths-based curriculum.

The online format and course schedule of the certificate program allows flexibility to accommodate both full-time students and working professionals. The College of Social Science, in collaboration with The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA), offers this program with all course work delivered via the World Wide Web at www.gpidea.org.

Admission

To be considered for admission into the Youth Development Specialist Graduate Certificate applicants must follow established University admission procedures. Students currently pursuing the Master of Arts in Youth Development are not eligible to apply for admission to the Youth Development Specialist Graduate Certificate.  For additional information, refer to the Admission section in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.

Requirements for the Youth Development Specialist Graduate Certificate

The program is available totally online. Each course is offered at least once every other year. The student must complete 13 credits of course work in collaboration with The Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA).

  1. The following course (1 credit):
    Foundations of Youth Development
  2. Four of the following courses (12 credits):
    Adolescents and Their Families
    Community Youth Development
    Contemporary Youth Issues
    Youth Development
    Youth in Cultural Contexts
    Youth Policy