Academic Programs Catalog

College of Social Science

School of Criminal Justice

Mary Finn, Director

Free and democratic society requires a commitment to safety and security as well as to core values of justice, equity, and civil liberty.  Indeed, the appropriate balance of security and liberty is an ongoing challenge of free societies.  Public and private agencies at various levels provide for security, safety, justice, and freedom through efforts to prevent crime and to appropriately respond to crime when it does occur. 

The academic study of criminal justice through the Bachelor of Arts, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in the School of Criminal Justice is based on the belief that the study of the causes of crime and delinquency must be combined with the study of the institutions and processes involved in the prevention and response to crime and delinquency.  Additionally, the systematic study of crime, criminal behavior, and criminal justice and security processes should be informed by multidisciplinary theory and research.  The challenges posed by crime and security in contemporary society necessitate well-educated professionals prepared for careers in criminal justice, security, and related areas.

The School of Criminal Justice offers an undergraduate minor in secuirty management, graduate specializations in security management, forensic science, and in judicial administration, and Master of Science degrees in Criminal Justice, Forensic Science, Law Enforcement Intelligence and Analysis, and Judicial Administration; and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Criminal Justice.

 


Undergraduate Programs


Criminal Justice

The Bachelor of Arts degree program in criminal justice is designed to prepare students for entry level positions in public and private agencies identified with criminal justice administration.  Such agencies apprehend offenders, adjudicate alleged offenses, redirect emergent criminal careers, and promote industrial and commercial security.  Such agencies also encourage and emphasize community responsibility for the success of their programs.

The bachelor's program in criminal justice provides a basic orientation to the institutions and processes of criminal justice and offers students wide exposure to all of the major disciplines of the criminal justice system.  The program promotes general knowledge through core and social science courses.  It provides students with the opportunity to pursue interests in the following areas:  juvenile justice, police administration, adult corrections, and security.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice

  1. The requirements of the University as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice.

    The University's Tier II writing requirement for the Criminal Justice major is met by completing one of the following courses: Criminal Justice 424, 426, 427, 430, 445, 465, or 485.  Those courses are referenced in item 3. a. (3) below.
  2. The requirements of the College of Social Science for the Bachelor of Arts degree.
  3. The following requirements for the major:
                   
    a. The following courses in the School of Criminal Justice (30 credits):  
      (1) All of the following Prerequisite Courses (12 credits):  
        CJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
        CJ 220 Criminology 3
        CJ 275 Criminal Procedure 3
        CJ 292 Methods of Criminal Justice Research 3
      (2) Two of the following courses (6 credits):  
        CJ 335 Policing 3
        CJ 365 Corrections 3
        CJ 355 Juvenile Justice 3
        CJ 385 Private Security 3
      (3) Twelve credits from the following courses including 3 credits in Criminal Justice 424, 427, 430, 445, 465, or 485. At least 9 credits must be at the 400-level.  
        CJ 210 Introduction to Forensic Science 3
        CJ 235 Investigation Procedures 3
        CJ 400H Honors Study 1 to 3
        CJ 422 Comparative and Historical Criminal Justice 3
        CJ 424 Crime, Mass Media, and Society (W) 3
        CJ 425 Women and Criminal Justice 3
        CJ 426 Violence Against Women (W) 3
        CJ 427 Criminology and Public Policy (W) 3
        CJ 429 Interdisciplinary Topics in Cybersecurity 3
        CJ 430 Advanced Seminar in Policing (W) 3
        CJ 432 Community Policing 3
        CJ 433 Law Enforcement Intelligence Operations 3
        CJ 434 Police Administration 3
        CJ 439 Homeland Security 3
        CJ 445 Cyber-Crime and Cyber-Security (W) 3
        CJ 465 Critical Issues in Corrections (W) 3
        CJ 466 Corrections Organizations and Systems 3
        CJ 471 Law of Corrections 3
        CJ 473 Comparative Constitutional Law 3
        CJ 474 Law and Criminal Justice Policy 3
        CJ 485 Critical Issues in Private Security 3
        CJ 490 Independent Study 1 to 3
        CJ 491 Topics in Criminal Justice 2 to 4

 


Minor in Law, Justice and Public Policy

The Minor in Law, Justice and Public Policy, administered by the School of Criminal Justice, enhances the education and training of students who anticipate entering fields that require multidisciplinary approaches to advanced research, professional practice, or policymaking related to law. 

The minor is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs in the College of Social Science. With the approval of the department and college that administer the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

Students who plan to complete the requirements of the minor should consult their major undergraduate advisor in the College of Social Science.

Requirements for the Minor in Law, Justice and Public Policy

Complete 15 credits from the following:

1. The following course (3 credits):
CJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
2. One of the following courses (3 credits):
CJ 220 Criminology 3
EC 425 Law and Economics (W) 3
HDFS 448 Child and Family Policy 3
HST 318B United States Constitutional History from 1877 3
PLS 321 Constitutional Law 3
SOC 131 Social Problems 3
3. Two of the following courses (6 credits):
CSUS 465 Environmental and Natural Resource Law 3
ENG 473B Law and Literature 3
GBL 323 Introduction to Business Law 3
IBIO 446 Environmental Issues and Public Policy 3
JRN 430 News Media Law and Ethics 3
PHL 354 Philosophy of Law 3
4. The following capstone course (3 credits):
PLS 320 Judicial Politics 3



 

Minor in Security Management

The complexities of modern society have combined to generate a variety of threats to business organizations, information networks, government installations and operations, and individuals.  The Minor in Security Management is designed for students who are interested in private and government security.

The minor, which is administered by the School of Criminal Justice, is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor's degree programs at Michigan State University.  The minor should be of particular interest to students who are enrolled in certain programs in the Eli Broad College of Business and the College of Social Science, and to students who are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science degree program in Computer Science.

The Minor in Security Management is designed to help students to understand:

  1. The business and technical aspects of protecting private and government assets.
  2. The administrative, management, technical, and legal problems of asset protection and loss prevention.
  3. Concepts related to protecting personal and personnel rights, proprietary information, facilities, and other assets of an organization.
  4. Security's relationship to the value of freedom and democratic principles in our society.

With the approval of the department or school and college that administer the student's degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor's degree.

Requirements for the Minor in Security Management

The student must complete:

1. All of the following courses (12 credits):  
  ACC 230 Survey of Accounting Concepts 3
  CJ 235 Investigative Procedures 3
  CJ 385 Private Security 3
  CJ 485 Critical Issues in Private Security (W) 3
2. One of the following courses (3 credits):  
  CJ 429 Interdisciplinary Topics in Cyber Security 3
  CJ 445 Cyber-Crime and Cyber-Security (W) 3
3. One of the following courses (3 credits):  
  CSE 101 Computing Concepts and Competencies 3
  FI 320 Introduction to Finance 3
  MGT 325 Management Skills and Processes 3
  MKT 327 Introduction to Marketing 3


 


Graduate Study

The School of Criminal Justice is at the forefront of education in the nature of crime, administration of criminal justice, security management and administration, and the legal system.   Throughout the program there is an emphasis on the relationship between theory and practice as well as the interconnection of the activities of the many agencies and professions involved in the systems of justice and private security. Through their research, teaching, and practice, graduates can contribute to the development of improved systems for the prevention and control of crime and delinquency.

The School of Criminal Justice offers a professionally and managerially oriented Master of Science degree program for advanced students, many of whom are criminal justice professionals.  The Master of Science degree is offered both on campus and through online delivery.  The Master of Science in Forensic Science offers concentrations in forensic anthropology, biology, and chemistry and is only offered on-campus. The School also offers Master of Science degrees in Law Enforcement Intelligence and Analysis and Judicial Administration, which are available only online.

The Doctor of Philosophy is designed to produce graduates who can apply interdisciplinary theory and a variety of research methodologies to the study of crime causation, social reaction, and the justice system.  The Ph.D. in Criminal Justice permits students to emphasize the study of crime, crime control, and justice administration while simultaneously developing a strong foundation in social science theory and research methods. It prepares students for careers in college and university teaching and research, as well as for advanced public-policy positions.


Criminal Justice - Master of Science

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

While a criminal justice undergraduate major comparable to that offered by this school is not required for admission to the Master of Science degree program, the applicant must have a background of education and occupational experience appropriate to the successful pursuit of graduate work in the concentration elected. Applicants insufficiently prepared for graduate study in criminal justice may have to complete collateral course work or pursue individualized study to satisfy deficiencies. Occupational experience is highly desirable before undertaking graduate study in some fields of criminal justice.

All applicants must have at least 12 credits of undergraduate course work in political science, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, history, social work, or any combination thereof. At least 6 of these credits must be in sociology, psychology, social work, or any combination of such courses.

Regular Status 

  1. A bachelor's degree from a recognized educational institution.
  2. An undergraduate grade–point average of 3.20 or higher.
  3. Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination General Test or a satisfactory score on the Miller Analogies Test (social science professional scale).
  4. Evidence of personal traits and characteristics considered important for scholarly performance.
  5. Occupational experience is given weight in the selection of master's degree candidates whenever such experience is important to the study of a specific concentration or is an important factor in obtaining appropriate employment after completion of the Master of Science degree.

Provisional Status

A limited number of applicants who do not satisfy the school's regular admission requirements may be accepted provisionally. These students will be judged on the basis of their potential contribution to the field of criminal justice. Students should not be enrolled on a provisional basis for more than one semester. The student must be admitted on a regular basis to be considered a degree candidate. To qualify for admission to regular status, the student must complete a minimum of 10 credits in criminal justice graduate course work with a grade–point average of 3.20 or higher.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Criminal Justice

The program is available under both Plan A (with thesis) and Plan B (without thesis).  The student must complete a total of 30 credits distributed as follows:

Requirements for Both Plan A and Plan B

               
1. Core Courses (15 credits)  
  CJ 801 Crime Causation, Prevention, and Control 3
  CJ 810 Proseminar in Criminal Justice 3
  CJ 811 Design and Analysis in Criminal Justice Research1 3
  CJ 812 Criminal Justice Management Seminar1 3
  CJ 887 Quantitative Methods in Criminal Justice Research 3
2. Plan A      
  1. Complete 6 credits of Criminal Justice 899 Master's Thesis Research with a grade of 3.0 or better.  
  2. Pass an oral examination in defense of the thesis.  
  3. Complete 3 credits of electives approved by the academic advisor.  
  Plan B    
  1. Complete Criminal Justice 896 Policy Analysis under Conditions of Change with a grade of 3.0 or better.  
  2. Pass an oral examination covering the policy analysis paper completed by successfully completing Criminal Justice 896.  
  3. Complete 6 credits of electives approved by the academic advisor.  
3. Criminal Justice electives approved by an academic advisor 6

 


 

 1For a student who completes the requirements for the graduate Specialization in Forensic Science.

  1. A course dealing with an aspect of the legal system approved by the School of Criminal Justice may be substituted for Criminal Justice 811.
  2. Criminal Justice 815 may be substituted for Criminal Justice 812.


 


Judicial Administration - Master of Science

The Master of Science degree in Judicial Administration is a Plan B (without thesis) online program designed for individuals desiring a leadership or management career in the judicial administration profession in the United States or internationally. Students who are currently employed in the U.S. federal, state, or local courts or courts in other countries may apply, as well as students wishing to enter a judicial administration career.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Master of Science degree program in Judicial Administration, an applicant must:

  1. Submit a personal statement regarding his or her academic and professional goals.
  2. Have a bachelor’s degree from a recognized educational institution. 
  3. Have an undergraduate grade–point average of 3.20 or higher. 
  4. Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination General Test (GRE) taken within the last five years. The GRE examination is waived for candidates who meet the undergraduate grade-point average requirement of 3.20 or for candidates who have completed a graduate degree.

The School of Criminal Justice recognizes that many applicants have been out of the academic environment for some time, and other factors may be considered in the admission process. A limited number of applicants who do not satisfy the School’s regular admission requirements may be admitted on a provisional basis. The decision to grant provisional admission is based on the student’s potential contributions to the field of judicial system administration. A student may be enrolled on a provisional basis for only two semesters and must be admitted on a regular basis to be considered a degree candidate.  Course work completed while on provisional status will not count towards the degree requirements.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Judicial Administration

The program is available only online, under Plan B (without thesis).  The student must complete a total of 30 credits distributed as follows:

               
1. All of the following courses (21 credits):  
  CJ 811 Design and Analysis in Criminal Justice Research 3
  CJ 812 Criminal Justice Management Seminar 3
  CJ 829 National and Global Trends in Court Planning 3
  CJ 860 Historical Foundations/Contemporary Frameworks in Judicial Administration 3
  CJ 861 Budget Planning and Resource Allocation for Court Performance 3
  CJ 862 Workforce Planning and Management in the Courts 3
  CJ 887 Quantitative Methods in Criminal Justice Research 3
2. Two of the following courses (6 credits):  
  CJ 863 Courthouse Planning: Space, Technology, Security, and Disaster Recovery 3
  CJ 864 Elements of Essential Court Operations 3
  JRN 892 Journalism Special Topics 3
3. The following course (3 credits):
 
  CJ 896 Policy Analysis Under Conditions of Change 3
4. Completion of a final examination or evaluation.  

 


Criminal Justice - Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in criminal justice focuses on criminal justice and criminology and theory-based knowledge of crime, criminal justice organizations and processes and the law. During the course of doctoral study, students are expected to develop the depth, breadth and consistency of their training in research methods and their applications of analytical capabilities to administrative and policy issues.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be eligible for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy program in Criminal Justice, an applicant must have:

  1. Completed an undergraduate degree in criminal justice or related social science field.
  2. An overall grade-point average of at least 3.2 in the most recent academic degree (master’s or bachelor’s).
  3. Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test as judged by the faculty.
  4. Evidence of experience in social science research, such as the completion of a master’s thesis.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Criminal Justice

Students who are enrolled in the Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Criminal Justice must complete a minimum of 72 credits.

  1. Completion of 24 credits in Criminal Justice 901, 904, 906, 907, 908, and 909.
  2. Students admitted directly from an undergraduate degree program must take Criminal Justice 811 and 887 as prerequisites to Criminal Justice 906, 907, and 909. Criminal Justice 811 and 887 may not be counted toward doctoral program requirements.
  3. Completion of 6 credits of additional criminal justice courses at the 800 level or above.
  4. Completion of 12 additional credits outside the School of Criminal Justice as approved by the student’s guidance committee.
  5. Completion of two 3-credit doctoral research methods courses in the College of Social Science as approved by the student’s guidance committee.
  6. Satisfactory completion of 24 credits of Criminal Justice 999 and defense of a doctoral dissertation.

Normally students complete the requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in four years.


Forensic Science - Master of Science

Several colleges and departments within Michigan State University cooperate to offer the Master of Science in Forensic Science. These include the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources in cooperation with the Department of Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies;  the College of Human Medicine in cooperation with the Department of Radiology; the College of Natural Science in cooperation with the departments of Chemistry; Pharmacology and Toxicology, Statistics and Probability, and Zoology as well as the Center for Advanced Microscopy, the Genetics Program and the Biomedical Laboratory Diagnostics Program; and the College of Social Science in cooperation with the Department of Anthropology and the School of Criminal Justice. The School of Criminal Justice is the primary administrative unit.

This program is designed to give all students a broad, theoretical and practical background in the scientific, legal and investigative aspects of forensic science while providing the opportunity to study one of the major disciplines in depth. Students enrolled in this program must complete a concentration in one of the following areas: forensic chemistry, forensic biology, or forensic anthropology.

A thesis is required of all students pursuing Plan A and opportunities exist for an internship in a practicing United States or international forensic science laboratory.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Master of Science degree program in forensic science, an applicant must have:

  1. completed a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree in a discipline appropriate to the desired concentration. For example, a student who desires to complete the concentration in forensic chemistry must have a bachelor’s degree in chemistry or a closely allied science such as biochemistry.
  2. a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 for all course work in the bachelors degree.
  3. satisfactory scores in the Graduate Record Examination General Test as judged by the program faculty. No substantive area GRE exams are required.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Forensic Science

The program is available under Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (without thesis). Each student will have a thesis advisory committee comprised of the academic advisor and two other program faculty. The student must complete at least 38 credits as follows:

               
1. The following courses (6 credits):  
  CJ 804 Crime Scene Investigation 1
  CJ 805 Survey in Forensic Science 3
  CJ 817 Law and Forensic Science 2
2. One of the following concentrations:  
  Forensic Chemistry (18 credits)  
  CEM 832 Mass Spectrometry 3
  CEM 835 Advanced Analytical Chemistry II 3
  CJ 819 Forensic Analysis of Drugs and Alcohol 3
  CJ 820 Forensic Chemistry and Microscopic Evidence 3
  NSC 820 Scanning Electron Microscopy; Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis 3
  PHM 431 Pharmacology of Drug Addiction 3
  Forensic Biology (18 credits):  
  BMB 801 Molecular Biology 3
  CJ 820 Forensic Chemistry and Microscopic Evidence 3
  CJ 824 Forensic Serology 3
  CJ 825 DNA Profiling 3
  FOR 842 Population Genetics, Genealogy and Genomics 3
    or          
  FW 828 Conservation and Genetics 3
  STT 464 Statistics for Biologists 3
  Forensic Anthropology (16 credits):  
  ANP 441 Osteology and Forensic Anthropology 4
  ANP 842 Human Osteology 5
  ANP 843 Bioarcheology 3
  ANP 844 Topics in Forensic Anthropology 4
  Students must enroll for Anthropology 844 twice, in increments of 2 credits.  
3. Complete an additional 8 to 10 credits of electives chosen in consultation with the student’s academic advisor.  

Additional Requirements for Plan A

1.    Complete 6 credits in Forensic Science 899 Master's Thesis Research.
2.    Attend at least one Master's Seminar Series lecture per semester.
3.    Pass an oral examination in defense of the thesis.

Additional Requirements for Plan B

1.    Complete 6 credits of Forensic Science 890 Independent Study.
2.    Attend at least one Master's Seminar Series lecture per semester.
3.    Completion of a final examination or evaluation.


Law Enforcement Intelligence and Analysis - Master of Science

The Master of Science degree in Law Enforcement Intelligence and Analysis is a Plan B (without thesis), online program designed for working law enforcement professionals to enhance their education and training in the critical field of intelligence. Criminal justice students wishing to enter a law enforcement career with a specialized graduate degree may also apply.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Social Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Master of Science degree program in Law Enforcement Intelligence and Analysis, an applicant must:

  1. submit a personal statement regarding their academic and professional goals.
  2. submit scores from a GRE general exam taken within the last five years. The GRE exam is waived for candidates with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.2 or higher from an accredited and recognized college or university, and for applicants with a completed graduate degree.

The School of Criminal Justice recognizes that many applicants have been out of the academic environment for some time, and other factors may be considered in the admission process. A limited number of applicants who do not satisfy the School’s regular admission requirements may be admitted on a provisional basis. The decision to grant provisional admission is based on the student’s potential contributions to the field of criminal justice. A student may be enrolled on a provisional basis for only two semesters and must be admitted on a regular basis to be considered a degree candidate. To qualify for regular status, a student must complete a minimum of 12 credits of graduate course work in criminal justice with a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Law Enforcement Intelligence and Analysis

               
The student must complete at least 30 credits under Plan B (without thesis).  
1. All of the following courses (9 credits):  
  CJ 802 Proseminar in Law Enforcement Intelligence Operations 3
  CJ 811 Design and Analysis in Criminal Justice Research 3
  CJ 887 Quantitative Methods in Criminal Justice Research 3
2. Five of the following courses (15 credits):  
  CJ 801 Crime Causation Prevention and Control 3
  CJ 803 Foundations in Homeland Security
3
  CJ 810 Proseminar in Criminal Justice 3
  CJ 822 Comparative Criminal Justice 3
  CJ 823 Globalization of Crime 3
  CJ 837 Counterterrorism and Intelligence 3
  CJ 838 Issues in Terrorism 3
  CJ 839 Analytic Thinking and Intelligence 3
  CJ 856 Advanced Topics in Policing 3
  GEO 802 Geospatial Technology 3
3. The following course (3 credits):  
  CJ 896 Policy Analysis under Conditions of Change 3
4. Complete an additional 3 credits of electives as approved by the student's guidance committee.
5. Complete a final examination or evaluation.  


Graduate Specialization in Forensic Science

The Graduate Specialization in Forensic Science provides a thorough understanding of the broad field of forensic science and prepares students for the role of court-qualified expert.  Students study scientific, technical, and ethical issues and the relationship of their own area of expertise to the criminal justice system. The legal aspects of forensic science presented include the study of court-qualified expert qualifications, types of scientific evidence likely to be admissible in court, and how evidence may become inadmissible for scientific and technical reasons.  Students will participate in a mock trial drawing on their systemic understanding of their field of expertise and their ability to explain methodology and evidence to laypersons.

This graduate specialization is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in doctoral degree programs at Michigan State University.  The Graduate Specialization in Forensic Science, which is administered by the School of Criminal Justice, is designed for individuals in a discipline that typically does not lend itself to full-time employment in a crime laboratory but may require participation in the criminal justice system in order to offer expert advice.  Completion of this specialization will provide students with knowledge of the United States legal system, scientific evidence, and intricacies of testifying, all of which are requisite to becoming an effective court-qualified expert in the courtroom.


With the approval of the department and college that administers the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the specialization may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the doctoral degree. The students program of study must be approved by the student’s advisor for the specialization.


Requirements for the Graduate Specialization in Forensic Science


The student must complete 9 credits from the following:

               
1. All of the following courses (6 credits):  
  CJ 805 Survey of Forensic Science 3
  CJ 817 Law and Forensic Science 2
  FRS 890 Independent Study 1
  Independent study will entail a substantial literature and legal essay reviewing the student’s specialized field as it relates to the forensic sciences and the legal system.  
2. Complete a 3 credit 800 or 900-level course that is relevant to the discipline, such as forensic anthropology or forensic entomology, and is approved by the student’s advisor and the Director of the Forensic Science program.  

Graduate Specialization in Judicial Administration

Management of the courts and the judicial process in contemporary society requires expert knowledge and complex skills. The courts need qualified professionals who can ensure that the public receives timely and just resolution to cases requiring judicial intervention.

The Specialization in Judicial Administration, which is administered by the School of Criminal Justice within the College of Social Science, is available online as an elective to students who are enrolled in master’s degree programs at Michigan State University with the exception of student's pursuing the Master of Science in Judicial Administration. This specialization is designed to meet the educational needs of students currently working in the judicial system. It prepares students to understand the purposes and responsibilities of the courts; leadership and its role in guiding the courts;  and interaction with the community. It provides opportunities to learn how to obtain and manage human resources including staff education and development, budgets, and fiscal resources; manage cases and information technology effectively; envision and plan strategically; and implement and manage auxiliary court programs and required services, which complement and support the core functions of the courts.

With the approval of the department or school and college that administers the student’s degree program, courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the specialization may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the master’s degree. The student’s program of study must be approved by the student’s guidance committee for the specialization.

Requirements for the Graduate Specialization in Judicial Administration

The student must:

               
1. Complete all of the following core courses (12 credits):  
  CJ 812 Criminal Justice Management Seminar 3
  CJ 829 National and Global Trends in Court Planning 3
  CJ 860 Historical Foundations/Contemporary Frameworks of Judicial Administration 3
  CJ 864 Elements of Essential Court Operations 3
  Equivalent courses may be substituted with approval of the Criminal Justice academic advisor.  

 


Graduate Specialization in Security Management

The complexities of modern society have combined to generate a variety of threats to business organizations, information networks, government installations and operations, and individuals.  The Graduate Specialization in Security Management is designed for students who are interested in private and government security.

The specialization, which is administered by the School of Criminal Justice, is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in master's degree programs at Michigan State University.  The specialization should be of particular interest to students who are enrolled in certain programs in the Eli Broad College of Business and the College of Social Science.

The Specialization in Security Management is designed to help students to understand:

  1. The business and technical aspects of protecting private and government assets.
  2. The administrative, management, technical, and legal problems of asset protection and loss prevention.
  3. Concepts related to protecting personal and personnel rights, proprietary information, facilities, and other assets of an organization.
  4. Security's relationship to the value of freedom and democratic principles in our society.

With the approval of the department or school and college that administer the student's degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the specialization may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the master's degree.

Requirements for the Graduate Specialization in Security Management:

The student must complete:

               
1. All of the following courses (15 credits):  
  CJ 801 Crime Causation, Prevention, and Control 3
  CJ 811 Design and Analysis in Criminal Justice Research 3
  CJ 812 Criminal Justice Management Seminar 3
  CJ 885 Security Management 3
  CJ 886 Security Administration 3
  An equivalent course may be substituted for Criminal Justice 811 and 812 with approval of a Criminal Justice advisor.  
2. One of the following courses (3 credits):  
  LIR 823 Organizational Behavior in Labor and Industrial Relations 3
  MGT 824 Management and Organizational Behavior 3
  PLS 810 Proseminar in Public Administration 3
  PSY 860 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 3