Academic Programs Catalog

College of Social Science

Undergraduate Programs

The College of Social Science offers degree programs through its departments and schools and through the Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science.  A student should carefully study the catalog descriptions of these majors before choosing one.  The three general types of majors in the college are described below.

A departmental major consists of at least 30 credits in courses recognized by the department as counting toward the major.  Each departmental major is designed to provide concentrated study in a specific field; it will be complemented by courses outside the major to give breadth to a student’s education, including an interdisciplinary minor.

A student majoring in one of the schools is introduced to principles and techniques that are basic to the subject area and then learns to apply them in professional programs of study.  The minimum number of credits required varies among programs.  In each school, the major program consists of courses offered within the school and course work in complementary disciplines.

The Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Science major, administered by the Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science, is organized around  four thematic concentrations.  Students select one from the following:  Community Governance and Advocacy, Health and Society, International Studies, and Liberal Studies.  The Social Science Education major is available for students seeking teacher certification.  The Global and International Studies in Social Science major focuses on the study of global systems and processes as they are expressed in local places.  

Majors in the college lead to either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree.  They provide a valuable background for those interested in a wide variety of careers, as well as for those intending to pursue advanced degrees in professional or graduate school.

 


Minors

The College of Social Science requires each student to complete an interdisciplinary minor.  Minors approved to meet this requirement include:  African Studies; Asian Studies; Environment and Health; Human Behavior and Social Services; International Development; Law, Justice and Public Policy; Leadership of Organizations; The City: Environment, Design, and Society; and Youth and Society.

The college also offers a number of other minors, which may be combined with the requirements of a student’s degree program if desired.  These include:  Anthropology; Asian Pacific American Studies; Chicano/Latino Studies; Defense Studies and Leadership; Economics; Geographic Information Science; Geography; Global Studies in Social Science; Latin American and Caribbean Studies; Peace and Justice Studies; Security Management; and Sociology.

Students in Social Science may also complete a Minor in Bioethics (see the Lyman Briggs College section of this catalog).

Students who are enrolled in bachelor's degree programs in the college may elect the Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies. For additional information, refer to the statement on Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies in the College of Natural Science section of this catalog.

 


Freshmen

Freshmen at Michigan State University are enrolled in the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative but may declare a major preference for a major in a department or school of the College of Social Science, the Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Science major, or the Global and International Studies in Social Science major.  Students who declare any Social Science major preference will be assigned an academic advisor in this College. Upon reaching 28 credits, sophomores may choose to declare their major in the college.

 


Admission to the College of Social Science

  1. Completion of at least 28 credits acceptable to the college.
  2. An academic record which at least meets the requirements of Academic Standing of Undergraduate Students.
  3. Acceptance as a major in a program of the college. The number of students admitted to the School of Planning, Design and Construction, Urban and Regional Planning, and the School of Social Work program is limited.
  4. Students interested in the History Education major or the Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Science: Social Science Education major must be admitted first to the Teacher Preparation Program in the College of Education.
     

Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Degrees

To ensure an appropriately broad and well-balanced education, all undergraduates enrolled in the College of Social Science must satisfy the following subject matter and credit distribution requirements, in addition to the graduation requirements of the University as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog.

The following restrictions pertain to all courses taken in fulfillment of requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in the College of Social Science:

  1. Courses applied to the university requirements in Integrative Studies and Mathematics may not also be counted toward the college graduation requirements.
  2. Unless otherwise noted, no more than two courses offered by a student’s major department or school may be counted toward the college requirements.
  3. Only credits in courses graded on the numerical or Pass-No Grade system may be counted toward college and major requirements, i.e. courses taken in satisfaction of college and major requirements may not be taken on a Credit-No Credit basis.
  4. Not more than 4 credits of independent study, internship, field experience, or practicum courses may be used to fulfill the college requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees.
  5. Complete the requirements of a major of no fewer than 30 credits with a minimum 2.0 grade-point average for courses in the major.
     
    All candidates must meet the following requirements:
    Bachelor of Arts
    1. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING REQUIREMENT
      All students must complete an experiential learning requirement.  The experiential learning requirement may be satisfied either within or outside the requirements of the major.  The requirement may be met by completing a 3 or 4-credit experiential learning course, approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy or its designee.  A list of approved courses will be maintained by the College of Social Science.  The experiential learning requirement is designed to ensure that each undergraduate student will have the opportunity to enhance problem-solving and integrative reasoning skills through practice outside of the traditional classroom learning environment.  Study abroad and study away experiences, internships, service learning and civic engagement experiences, undergraduate research, including, in appropriate cases, honors theses, and entrepreneurship experiences can meet this requirement.  The requirement may also be met through a non-credit experience, for example, an undergraduate research experience mentored by a faculty member, if approved in advance by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy or its designee.  For further information, consult the Office of Student Affairs in the College of Social Science or an academic advisor in a department or school.
    2. INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR REQUIREMENT
      Complete a minimum of 15 credits in one Interdisciplinary Minor from a list of minors approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy.  Minors approved for this requirement include: African Studies; Asian Studies; The City: Environment, Design and Society; Law, Justice, and Public Policy; Leadership of Organizations; Human Behavior and Social Services; Youth and Society.  Other interdisciplinary minors can meet this requirement if approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy or its designee.  For further information, consult the Office of Student Affairs in the College of Social Science or an academic advisor in a department or school.
    3. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT
      Complete a minimum of 6 credits in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics courses from a list of courses approved and maintained by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy. Most courses offered in the College of Natural Science and the College of Engineering count toward this requirement.  Other courses approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy can meet this requirement. For further information, consult the Office of Student Affairs in the College of Social Science or an academic advisor in a department or school.  A department or school may require its majors to complete specific courses or particular subject matter areas to satisfy this requirement.  The requirement may be satisfied either within or outside the requirements of the major or within the interdisciplinary minor.  Mathematics 1825, 100E, and 290 may not apply to this requirement for the Bachelor of Arts degree.
    4. DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS
      1. Complete a minimum of 30 credits in courses numbered at the 300 level and above. Courses offered by the student’s major department or school may be used to satisfy this requirement.
      2. A maximum of 12 credits of independent study may be applied to the degree.
      3. A maximum of 12 credits of internship, field experience, or practicum credits may be applied to the degree.
      4. The total of independent study, internship, field experience, and practicum credits applied to the degree may not exceed 20 credits.
         
Bachelor of Science
  1. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING REQUIREMENT
    All students must complete an experiential learning requirement.  The experiential learning requirement may be satisfied either within or outside the requirements of the major.  The requirement may be met by completing a 3 or 4-credit experiential learning course, approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy or its designee.  A list of approved courses will be maintained by the College of Social Science.  The experiential learning requirement is designed to ensure that each undergraduate student will have the opportunity to enhance problem-solving and integrative reasoning skills through practice outside of the traditional classroom learning environment.  Study abroad and study away experiences, internships, service learning and civic engagement experiences, undergraduate research, including, in appropriate cases, honors theses, and entrepreneurship experiences can meet this requirement.  The requirement may also be met through a non-credit experience, for example, an undergraduate research experience mentored by a faculty member, if approved in advance by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy or its designee.  For further information, consult the Office of Student Affairs in the College of Social Science or an academic advisor in a department or school.
  2. INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR REQUIREMENT
    Complete a minimum of 15 credits in one Interdisciplinary Minor from a list of minors approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy.  Minors approved for this requirement include: African Studies; Asian Studies; The City: Environment, Design and Society; Law, Justice, and Public Policy; Leadership of Organizations; Human Behavior and Social Services; Youth and Society.  Other interdisciplinary minors can meet this requirement if approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy or its designee.  For further information, consult the Office of Student Affairs in the College of Social Science or an academic advisor in a department or school.
  3. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT
    Complete a minimum of 12 credits in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics courses from a list of courses approved and maintained by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy. Most courses offered in the College of Natural Science and the College of Engineering count toward this requirement.  Other courses approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy can meet this requirement. For further information, consult the Office of Student Affairs in the College of Social Science or an academic advisor in a department or school.  A department or school may require its majors to complete more than 12 credits to satisfy this requirement.  The requirement may be satisfied either within or outside the requirements of the major or within the interdisciplinary minor.  Mathematics 1825, 100E, and 290 may not apply to this requirement for the Bachelor of Science degree.
  4. ARTS AND HUMANITIES REQUIREMENT
    Complete a minimum of 6 credits in Arts and Humanities from a list of courses approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy.  Most courses offered in the College of Arts and Letters count toward this requirement.  Other courses approved by the College of Social Science Committee on Curriculum and Academic Policy can meet this requirement.  A list of approved courses is maintained by the College of Social Science.  For further information, consult the Office of Student Affairs in the College of Social Science or an academic advisor in a department or school.  A department or school may require its majors to complete specific courses or particular subject matter areas to satisfy this requirement.  The requirement may be satisfied either within or outside the requirements of the major or within the interdisciplinary minor.
  5. DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS
    1. Complete a minimum of 30 credits in courses numbered at the 300 level and above. Courses offered by the student’s major department or school may be used to satisfy this requirement.
    2. A maximum of 12 credits of independent study may be applied to the degree.
    3. A maximum of 12 credits of internship, field experience, or practicum credits may be applied to the degree.
    4. The total of independent study, internship, field experience, and practicum credits applied to the degree may not exceed 20 credits.

Preprofessional Programs

Students at Michigan State University may select programs of study that satisfy the admission requirements of a professional school of their choice, such as law or medicine.  Since the admission requirements to professional programs vary among schools, it is not feasible to establish a single program for each profession that satisfies the admission requirements of all professional schools.  In the field of law, however, the College of Social Science has suggested programs of study that satisfy the admission requirements of most law schools.  It is the student’s responsibility to determine whether a proposed program meets the entrance requirements of the desired professional school.

Prelaw. Prelaw programs in the College of Social Science are available through the Department of Political Science and the Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Science Program. For additional information refer to those sections and to the university statement on prelaw programs in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog.

Premed. Students preparing for medical school may pursue a premed program in combination with the B.S. degree program in several majors in the College, such as Anthropology, Human Development and Family Studies, Psychology, Sociology or the Interdisciplinary Studies in Social Science (Health and Society) major.  Declared premed students will be advised by a preprofessional advisor in the College of Natural Science as well as by the academic advisor in their Social Science major.


Honors Study

The College of Social Science encourages honors students to develop distinctive undergraduate programs in their chosen fields.  In each major a specially designated Honors Advisor, usually a member of the faculty, assists students to plan a rigorous and balanced program tailored to the students’ individual interests and abilities.

Departments and schools of the college offer honors courses and seminars at both introductory and advanced levels.  These courses are provided chiefly, but not exclusively, for members of the Honors College.  In addition, the college offers independent study and research opportunities for Honors College students whose interests in social, behavioral, and economic science reach beyond the topics covered by college courses.



Minor in African Studies

The Minor in African Studies, which is administered by the College of Social Science, is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor's degree programs at Michigan State University.  Although the minor complements a number of major fields, students who plan graduate study related to Africa, who wish to pursue careers in international agencies in the United States and other countries, or who wish to work in Africa may find the minor particularly appealing.  With the approval of the department and college that administer the student's degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor's degree.

The Minor in African Studies provides a multidisciplinary educational experience for students who are interested in Africa.  The minor is designed to help students to acquire a better understanding of diverse aspects of African environments, economies, politics, societies, and cultures.

The student's program of study for the minor must be approved in advance and in writing by the advisor for African studies in the College of Social Science.

Requirements for the Minor in African Studies

                   
The student must complete a minimum of 16 credits:  
1.   The following core course (4 credits):    
    HST 208 Introduction to African History, Culture and Society 4
2.   One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
    ANP 417 Introduction to Islam in Africa 3
    ANP 455 Archaeology of Ancient Egypt 3
    GEO 338 Geography of Africa   3
    GEO 339 Geography of the Middle East and North Africa 3
    HST 201 Historical Methods and Skills 3
    HST 360 African History to 1800 3
    HST 361 African History since 1800 3
    HST 364 South Africa: From Shaka Zulu to Mandela 3
    HST 421 Women and Gender in Africa 3
    HST 450 Special Topics in African History 3
    HST 484 Seminar in African History (W) 3
    PLS 422 Seminar in Political Science (W) 4
    The topic of HST 201 and PLS 422 must contain specific content pertaining to African studies and be approved by the African Studies advisor.  
3.   Complete at least 6 credits from the following courses (6 credits):  
    EEP 260 World Food, Population and Poverty 3
    ENG 350 Readings in African, African-American, or African Diaspora Literature 3
    HA 271 African Art       3
    MC 395 Cultural Dimensions of Public Affairs 4
    MUS 426 Music of Africa     2
    PHL 351 African Philosophy     3
    RCAH 203 Transcultural Relations through the Ages 4
    REL 360 African Religion     3
    The topic of MC 395 and RCAH 203 must contain specific content pertaining to African studies and be approved by the African Studies advisor.  
4.   The following course (3 credits):      
    PLS 351 African Politics     3
Students are encouraged to take courses in African languages to enhance their understanding of Africa.  

Minor in Asian Pacific American Studies

The Minor in Asian Pacific American Studies, which is administered by the College of Social Science, is available as an elective to students enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs at Michigan State University.  Although the minor complements a number of major fields, students who plan graduate study related to the social sciences, ethnic studies, literature, media studies, or history may find this minor engaging. Students interested in pursuing professional training in business administration and management, city and regional planning, counseling, education, law, library and information science, public health, and social welfare may also be interested.

The minor focuses on social and cultural history and contemporary issues relating to Asian Pacific Americans, a diverse group who come from varying class, ethnic, religious, and national backgrounds. The minor incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to issues and populations in the United States and includes exposure to current research, case studies, and contact with local communities.

Students who are interested in this minor must contact the coordinator for the Minor in Asian Pacific American Studies. The student’s program of study for the minor must be approved in advance and in writing by the coordinator for Asian Pacific American Studies. With the approval of the department and college that administer the student’s degree program, courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for a bachelor’s degree. Certain courses in the minor may require approval of the department or college that administers the course, and enrollment in a specific section as approved by the coordinator of the minor.

Requirements for the Minor in Asian Pacific American Studies

                   
The student must complete a minimum of 15 credits:  
1.   The following core course (3 credits):    
    SSC 293 Introduction to Asian Pacific American Studies 3
2.   Complete one course from each of the following areas (minimum of 12 credits):  
    Asian Pacific American Studies      
    ANP 437 Asian Emigrant Communities: A Global Perspective 3
    ENG 352 Readings in Asian or Asian American Literature 3
    ISS 335 National Diversity and Change: United States (N) 4
    MC 319 Asian American History 4
    Asian Diaspora            
    ANP 437 Asian Emigrant Communities: A Global Perspective 3
    ENG 352 Readings in Asian or Asian American Literature 3
    ENG 360 Studies in Postcolonial and Diaspora Literature (W) 3
    ENG 460 Seminar in Global and Postcolonial Literature 3
    FLM 451 Studies in Postcolonial Cinema 3
    MC 369 Global Issues in Citizenship (W) 4
    Race and Ethnicity          
    ANP 330 Race, Ethnicity, and Nation: Anthropological Approaches to Collective Identity 3
    ENG 449 Seminar in Race, Ethnicity, Literature 3
    FLM 450 Studies in Ethnic Film   3
    HDFS 442 Ethnic Families in America 3
    MC 281 Immigrants, Minorities, and American Pluralism 4
    MC 385 Comparative Race and Ethnic Relations 4
    SOC 215 Race and Ethnicity     3
    Asian Studies            
    ANP 414 Anthropology of South Asia 3
    ANP 415 China: Culture and Society 3
    ASN 464 Studies in the Literature of Asia and the Asian Diaspora (W) 3
    HA 260 Asian Art       3
    HA 462 The Arts of China     4
    HA 463 Japanese Art       4
    HST 210 Modern East Asia     4
    HST 365 The Vietnam War     3
    HST 366 Southeast Asia in the Age of Empire 3
    HST 368 China since 1900     3
    HST 370 Japan since 1800     3
    HST 451 Special Topics in Asian History 3
    MC 323 Japanese Foreign Policy 4
    PSY 493 Issues in Psychology (W) 3
    REL 325 East Asian Buddhism   3
    REL 335 East Asian Religions   3
    REL 355 Southeast Asian Religions 3
    With the approval of the Coordinator for Asian Pacific American Studies, students may take a second Asian Pacific American Studies or Asian Diaspora Studies course in place of an Asian Studies course. Students may not use the same course to fulfill the requirement in different areas.  
    The topic of ISS 335 and PSY 493 must contain specific content pertaining to Asian Pacific American Studies and be approved by the Coordinator for Asian Pacific American Studies.
 
 
    One Asian language course (Chinese, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Tamil, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Uzbek, Vietnamese and other languages as approved), may be used toward Asian Studies courses in requirement 2.  
    With the advance approval of the Coordinator for Asian Pacific American Studies, other courses and options such as study abroad, study away, and independent study may be used to fulfill minor requirements.  

 


Minor in Asian Studies

The Minor in Asian Studies, which is administered by the College of Social Science, is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor's degree programs at Michigan State University.  Although the minor complements a number of major fields, students who plan graduate study related to Asia or who wish to pursue careers in government or with corporations in Asia may find the minor particularly appealing.  With the approval of the department and college that administer the student's degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor's degree. Courses taken in a Michigan State University Study Abroad program in Asia may be counted toward the minor with the permission of the Director of the Asian Studies Center and the student's advisor.

The Minor in Asian Studies provides an opportunity for students to create a multidisciplinary specialty with Asia as the  focus.  The student's program of study for the minor must be approved in advance and in writing by the advisor for Asian Studies in Social Science.

Requirements for the Minor in Asian Studies

                     
The student must complete a minimum of 16 credits:    
1.   The following core course (4 credits):      
    HST 160 Introduction to Asian History and Culture 4  
2.   One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):    
    ANP 414 Anthropology of South Asia 3  
    ANP 415 China: Culture and Society 3  
    ANP 419 Anthropology of the Middle East 3  
    EC 406 Economic Analysis of Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States (W) 3  
    EC 413 Economic Analysis of Asia (W) 3  
    GEO 339 Geography of the Middle East and North Africa 3  
    GEO 340 Geography of Eurasia   3  
    HST 209 Traditional East Asia   4  
    HST 210 Modern East Asia     4  
    HST 343 Russia from Peter the Great to Lenin 3  
    HST 344 Russia in Twentieth Century 3  
    HST 365 The Vietnam War     3  
    HST 366 Southeast Asia in the Age of Empire 3  
    HST 367 Imperial China     3  
    HST 368 China since 1900     3  
    HST 369 Japan to 1800       3  
    HST 370 Japan since 1800     3  
    HST 372 The Middle East: Islam and Empires 3  
    HST 373 The Modern Middle East: From Empires to Nation States 3  
    HST 451 Special Topics in Asian History 3  
    HST 485 Seminar in Asian History (W) 3  
    ISS 330B Asia: Social Science Perspectives (I) 4  
    MC 441 Islam and World Politics 4  
    PLS 354 Politics of Asia     3  
    PLS 358 Politics of the U.S.S.R. and Its Successor States 3  
    The following courses may not fulfill requirement 3. below if used to fulfill this requirement: MC 441 and PLS 358.
3.   Complete at least 6 credits from the following courses (6 credits):    
    ASN 291 Special Topics in Asian Languages 1-4  
    ASN 401 East Asian Cultures (W) 3  
    HA 260 Asian Art       3  
    HA 261 Modern Asian Art     3  
    HA 462 The Arts of China     4  
    HA 463 Japanese Art       4  
    IAH 204 Asia and the World (I)   4  
    IAH 211B Area Studies and Multicultural Civilizations: Asia (I) 4  
    LL 250B Topics in National Cinemas: East Asian Cinema 3  
    MC 323 Japanese Foreign Policy 4  
    MC 324D Regional Politics, Cooperation, and Conflict in Asia 4  
    MC 328 Russian Foreign Policy   4  
    MC 441 Islam and World Politics 4  
    MUS 425 Music of South Asia and Its Diaspora 2  
    MUS 429 Music of East Asia     2  
    PLS 358 Politics of the U.S.S.R. and Its Successor States 3  
    REL 325 East Asian Buddhism   3  
    REL 330 Islam         3  
    REL 335 East Asian Religions   3  
    REL 340 Hinduism       3  
    REL 345 Religions of South Asia 3  
    REL 350 Buddhism in South Asia 3  
    REL 355 Southeast Asian Religions 3  
    REL 430 The Qur’an and Its Interpreters (W) 3  
    REL 432 Modern Muslim Thought (W) 3  
    The following courses may not fulfill requirement 2. above if used to fulfill this requirement: MC 441 and PLS 358. Students may not use both IAH 204 and IAH 211B to fulfill this requirement.    
4.   The following course (3 credits):        
    GEO 337 Geography of Asia-Pacific 3  
With the advance approval of the Asian Studies advisor in the College of Social Science, other courses and options such as study abroad, study away, and independent study may be used to fulfill minor requirements. Student are encourage to take courses in Asian languages to enhance their understanding of Asia.    



Minor in Chicano/Latino Studies

The Minor in Chicano/Latino Studies, which is administered by the College of Social Science, is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor's degree programs at Michigan State University.  Although the minor complements a number of major fields, students who plan graduate study related to the social sciences or who wish to pursue careers in education, social work, government or businesses that serve mixed ethnic communities may find the minor particularly appealing.  With the approval of the department and college that administer the student's degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor's degree.

The Minor in Chicano/Latino Studies is designed to help students to understand the multicultural dimensions of society; to gain a knowledge of Chicano/Latino scholarship and scholars; and to apply that knowledge to the study of Chicano/Latino communities and life.  The minor draws on research, teaching, and community service among Chicanas/os and U.S. Latinas/os that:

  1. Focuses intensively on the histories of different racial and cultural sub–groups of Latinos.
  2. Draws larger theoretical lessons from comparisons among these groups and between non–Latino populations.
  3. Seeks to articulate general principles that shape racial and ethnic relations.
  4. Explores how ethnic identity is constructed and reconstructed over time.
  5. Develops methodologies and principles which empower students to enhance leadership and human relations within diverse communities of peoples and conditions.
Students who plan to complete the requirements of the minor should consult the Director of Chicano/Latino Studies.

Requirements for the Minor in Chicano/Latino Studies

The student must complete a total of 15 credits including:

1. The following course (3 credits):
CLS 201 Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies 3
2. Three of the following courses focusing on Chicano/Latino content (9 credits):
ENG 351 Readings in Chicano and Latino Literatures 3
GSAH 230 Values, Experience, and Difference in Global Contexts 3
HDFS 442 Ethnic Families in America 3
HST 327 History of Mexican Americans in the United States 3
HST 383 The Caribbean 3
HST 384 Modern Mexico 3
PLS 304 Minority Politics 3
SOC 215 Race and Ethnicity 3
SOC 499 Social Issues and Change in Contemporary Society (W) 3
SPN 350 Introduction to Reading Hispanic Literature (W) 3
SPN 412 Topics in Hispanic Culture 3
SPN 491 Special Topics in Spanish 3
The following courses must have at least one-fourth of the content focus specifically on Chicanas/os and U.S. Latinas/os in the United States:  GSAH 230, SOC 215 and 499, SPN 412, or 491. Both HST 383 and HST 384 may not be used to fulfill this requirement. This requirement may be fulfilled by other courses with a Chicano/Latino focus, if approved in advance by the Director of Chicano/Latino Studies. The courses must deal with ethnicity, race, gender, and inequality. To qualify for inclusion, at least one-fourth of the content of the course must focus specifically on Chicano/Latinos in the United States.
3. One of the following three options (3 credits):
a. A supervised internship (CLS 493) relevant to Chicano/Latino studies with a public or private agency or organization.  To satisfy this option, the student must complete one course of at least 3 credits approved in advance by the Director for Chicano/Latino Studies.
b. Directed study abroad relevant to Chicano/Latino Studies. To satisfy this option, the student must complete one course of at least 3 credits approved in advance by the Director  for Chicano/Latino Studies.
c. A research experience relevant to Chicano/Latino Studies (CLS 490).  To satisfy this option, the student must complete one course of at least 3 credits approved in advance by the Director for Chicano/Latino Studies.


Minor in Global Studies in Social Science

The Minor in Global Studies in Social Science, which is administered by the College of Social Science, is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor's degree programs at Michigan State University.  The minor should be attractive to students who plan careers with a global focus and who, therefore, wish to add a strong global dimension to their disciplinary majors.  With the approval of the department and college that administer the student's degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor's degree.

The Minor in Global Studies in Social Science is designed for students who wish to increase their understanding of the processes of continuity and change in various regions of the world, particularly Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.  The minor provides an opportunity for students to learn how contemporary global systems influence global relations and national trends, as well as how culture shapes processes of continuity and change in one of the major world regions.  Multidisciplinary in theory and practice, the minor is based on the methodologies, theories, and literatures of the social sciences and liberal arts and involves faculty from the social sciences, languages, and applied professional fields.

The College of Social Science academic advisor for Global Studies in Social Science assists the student in planning a program of study that is tailored to the student's interests, disciplinary major, and career objectives.  The student's program of study for the minor must be approved in advance and in writing by the advisor for global studies in social science.

Requirements for the Minor in Global Studies in Social Science

The student must meet the requirements specified below:

                           
1.     Complete a minimum of 15 credits in courses at the 200 level or above excluding any credits in courses that are used to satisfy the Foreign Language Proficiency requirement referenced in item 2. below.  Not more than 4 of the 15 credits may be in 200–level courses.      
2.     Foreign Language Proficiency:   Demonstrate proficiency in a modern foreign language equivalent to four semesters of study at the university level.  The results of the Michigan State University foreign language placement test will be considered in determining whether or not the student has fulfilled this requirement.  The student is encouraged to complete a fifth semester of study in the language that focuses on the culture, history, and literature of a developing region of the world.      
3.     Conceptual Courses:  Complete at least two of the following courses that are in a field other than the student's major (6 credits):
      ABM  427 Global Agri-Food Industries and Markets 3    
      ANP  321 Anthropology of Social Movements  3    
      ANP  370 Culture, Health, and Illness 3    
      ANP  431 Gender, Environment and Development  3    
      ANP  436 Globalization and Justice: Issues in Political and Legal Anthropology 3    
      ANR  250 Global Issues in Agriculture and Natural Resources 3    
      ANR  475 International Studies in Agriculture and Natural Resources 2 to 6    
      ANS  480 Animal Systems in International Development 3    
      EC  410 Issues in the Economics of Developing Countries (W) 3    
      EEP  260 World Food, Population and Poverty 3    
      GEO  435 Geography of Health and Disease 3    
      GEO  454 Geography of Environment and Development 3    
      MC  320 Politics, Society and Economy in the Third World 4    
      PLS  342 Comparative Political Economy  3    
      PLS  344 Politics of Developing Countries 3    
      PLS  347 Democratic Regimes 3    
      PLS  363 International and Domestic Political Conflict  3    
      SOC  310 Global Migration 3    
      SOC  362 Developing Societies 3    
      SOC  416 Global Regions 3    
      SOC  451 Dynamics of Population  3    
      SOC  452 Environment and Society 3    
      WS  403 Women and Change in Developing Countries 3    
4.     Regional Courses:  Complete at least one course in any one of the following four geographic areas (3 or 4 credits):    
      Africa and the Middle East      
      ANP 416 Anthropology of Southern Africa 3    
      ANP 419 Anthropology of the Middle East 3    
      EC 414 Economic Analysis of Sub–Saharan Africa (W) 3    
      GEO 338 Geography of Africa 3    
      GEO 339 Geography of the Middle East and North Africa 3    
      HST 208 Introduction to African History, Culture and Society 4    
      HST 361 African History since 1800 3    
      HST 364 South Africa: From Shaka Zulu to Mandela 3    
      HST 373 The Modern Middle East: From Empires to Nation States 3    
      HST 450 Special Topics in African History 3    
      HST 484 Seminar in African History (W) 3    
      MC 324A Regional Politics, Cooperation, and Conflict in the Middle East 4    
      MC 324B Regional Politics, Cooperation, and Conflict in Sub–Saharan Africa 4    
      PLS 346 Middle East Politics 3    
      PLS 351 African Politics 3    
      Asia      
      ANP 414 Anthropology of South Asia 3    
      ANP 415 China:  Culture and Society 3    
      ANP 437 Asian Emigrant Communities: A Global Perspective 3    
      EC 413 Economic Analysis of Asia (W) 3    
      GEO 337 Geography of Asia-Pacific 3    
      HST 210 Modern East Asia 4    
      HST 367 Imperial China 3    
      HST 368 China since 1900 3    
      HST 369 Japan to 1800 3    
      HST 370 Japan Since 1800 3    
      HST 451 Special Topics in Asian History 3    
      HST 485 Seminar in Asian History (W) 3    
      MC 323 Japanese Foreign Policy 4    
      MC 324D Regional Politics, Cooperation and Conflict in Asia 4    
      PLS 354 Politics of Asia 3    
      Europe      
      EC 406 Economic Analysis of Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States (W) 3    
      GEO  336 Geography of Europe  3    
      GEO  340 Geography of Eurasia 3    
      HST  336 Contemporary Europe, 1870 to Present 3    
      HST 342 Modern East-Central Europe 3    
      HST 344 Russia in the Twentieth Century 3    
      HST  348 Modern Germany 3    
      HST  452 Special Topics in European History 3    
      MC  328 Russian Foreign Policy 4    
      PLS  356 Politics of Europe and the European Union  3    
      PLS  358 Politics of the U.S.S.R. and Its Successor States  3    
      Latin America and the Caribbean      
      ANP 410 Anthropology of Latin America 3    
      EC 412 Economic Analysis of Latin America (W) 3    
      GEO 335 Geography of Latin America 3    
      HST 212 National Latin America 4    
      HST 382 Modern Brazil 3    
      HST 383 The Caribbean 3    
      HST 384 Modern Mexico 3    
      HST 453 Special Topics in Latin American History 3    
      HST 486 Seminar in Latin American History (W) 3    
      MC 324C Regional Politics, Cooperation, and Conflict in Latin America and the Caribbean 4    
5.     Field Experience, Internship, Thesis, or Independent Study      
      (3 or 4 credits):  Complete one of the following three options:      
      a. An overseas field experience or internship in one of the four geographic areas listed in item 4. above.        
      b. A domestic internship that involves working on global issues.      
      c. A thesis or independent study under the direction of a faculty member.      
6.     Senior–level Seminar Course (3 or 4 credits).      
      Complete one course with significant global content, approved by the College of Social Science academic advisor for the Global Studies in Social Science minor.      


Minor in International Development

The Minor in International Development, administered by the College of Social Science, is an enhanced integrative learning program of study designed to assist students in understanding the social context of international development. Students will acquire a basic understanding of how social scientists approach international development and how to integrate different approaches to the interrelationships of topics around international development. 

The minor is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs in the College of Social Science or James Madison College. With the approval of the department and college that administer the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

Students who plan to complete the requirements of the minor should consult an undergraduate adviser in the College of Social Science.

Requirements for the Minor in International Development

Complete a minimum of 15 credits from the following:

1. The following course (3 credits):
ANP 201 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3
2. One of the following courses (3 credits):
EC 310 Economics of Developing Countries 3
EC 410 Issues in the Economics of Developing Countries (W) 3
GEO 204 World Regional Geography 3
HST 390 History of International Relations 3
PLS 342 Comparative Political Economy 3
SOC 362 Developing Societies 3
3. Two of the following courses (6 credits):
CSUS 215 International Development and Sustainability 3
EEP 260 World Food, Population and Poverty 3
GSAH 220 Global Interactions and Identities 3
MC 430 Applied International Development 3
PHL 358 Philosophy, Gender, and Global Development 3
PHL 452 Ethics and Development 3
WS 403 Women and Change in Developing Countries 3
4. The following capstone course (3 credits):
ANP 325 Anthropology of the Environment and Development 3



 

Minor in Latin American and Caribbean Studies

The Minor in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, which is administered by the College of Social Science, is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor's degree programs at Michigan State University.  The minor emphasizes coherent course work about the cultural context, history, politics, economics, and geography of Latin American and the Caribbean with the potential for complementary experiential learning. Some courses focus on individual countries, while others are comparative and cross-national. Second-year language proficiency is required. Linking preparatory course selections to experiential learning (study abroad or mentored research) is encouraged. The outcomes of these projects will be developed, presented and discussed in seminar series. With the approval of the department and college that administer the student's degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor's degree.

Requirements for the Minor in Latin American and Caribbean Studies

The student must complete a minimum of 15 credits as specified below:

                     
1.   Foreign Language Proficiency: Proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese or other relevant language is required and must be demonstrated by completion of second-year, university-level courses or equivalent language placement scores based on a Michigan State University placement test or equivalent examination. Students who are native speakers in the target language should contact the minor advisor to discuss placement.
2.   Complete a minimum of 14 credits from the following list, with at least four courses from at least two departments:
    Anthropology              
    ANP 410 Anthropology of Latin America 3  
    Economics              
    EC 412 Economic Analysis of Latin America (W) 3  
    English                
    ENG 351 Readings in Chicano and Latino Literatures 3  
    Geography              
    GEO 335 Geography of Latin America 3  
    History                
    HST 211 Colonial Latin America 4  
    HST 212 National Latin America 4  
    HST 382 Modern Brazil       3  
    HST 383 The Caribbean     3  
    HST 384 Modern Mexico     3  
    HST 453 Special Topics in Latin American History 3  
    HST 486 Seminar in Latin American History (W) 3  
    Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities    
    IAH 203 Latin America and the World (I) 4  
    Integrative Studies in Social Science      
    ISS 330C Latin America: Social Science Perspectives (I) 4  
    James Madison College            
    MC 324C Regional Politics, Cooperation, and Conflict in Latin America and the Caribbean 4  
    Political Science            
    PLS 352 Latin American Politics 3  
    Portuguese              
    PRT 150 Portuguese for Speakers of Other Romance Languages I 4  
    PRT 250 Portuguese for Speakers of Other Romance Languages II 4  
    PRT 320 Advanced Portuguese   3  
    PRT 340 Topics in Luso-Brazilian Language and Culture 3  
    PRT 350 Introduction to Literary Analysis (W) 3  
    Students that place into Third-Year Spanish may also count either PRT 150 or 250 toward general minor credits.
    Spanish              
    SPN 342 Media and Conversation 3  
    SPN 350 Introduction to Reading Hispanic Literature (W) 3  
    SPN 412 Topics in Hispanic Culture 3  
    SPN 432 Latin America and its Literature 3  
    SPN 472 Topics in the Literatures of the Americas 3  
    Electives (1 to 4 credits)          
    A maximum of 4 credits of experiential learning such as an internship, independent study, guided research, service learning, study abroad or relevant elective courses, approved by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, may substitute for credits in requirement 2.    
3.   Completion of the Seminar Series in Latin American and Caribbean Studies through enrollment of 1 credit in SSC 490. Students may opt for an additional enrollment of 1 credit for a maximum of 2 credits. Students will develop a project based on Latin American and Caribbean studies course work or elective experiential learning experience in the form of a research paper or other creative work to be presented in the seminar series at the completion of the minor.    

 


Minor in Peace and Justice Studies

The Minor in Peace and Justice Studies, which is administered by the College of Social Science, is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs at Michigan State University. The minor explores issues of human rights, social justice, environmental justice, economic justice, activism, peace, violence, and conflict, examining their connections and distinctions through an interdisciplinary curriculum that stimulates students to develop the critical thinking skills necessary to face global challenges.  The minor allows students to explore a range of thematic issues by developing a series of critical analytics that enable them to discern how power and injustice operate. Students will use critical thinking skills to analyze particular case studies or thematic issues.

With the approval of the department and the college that administer the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

The student’s program of study must be approved by the undergraduate advisor for Peace and Justice Studies before enrollment.

Requirements for the Minor in Peace and Justice Studies

The student must complete the following (15 credits):

                       
1.     One of the following core courses focusing on basic concepts and assumptions of peace and justice, contexts of violence and domination, alternatives to violence and domination, and peace and justice as a practice (3 credits):  
      ANP 436 Globalization and Justice: Issues in Political and Legal Anthropology 3
      ANP 439 Human Rights: Anthropological Perspectives 3
      PHL 353 Core Themes in Peace and Justice Studies  
2.     Complete 12 credits from the following.  At least 9 credits must be at the 300-400 level and 3 credits must be in a subject outside the student’s major. Courses must be approved by the undergraduate advisor for the Minor in Peace and Justice Studies to ensure appropriate amount of peace and justice studies content.  
      ANP 220 Gender Relations in Comparative Perspective 3
      ANP 236 The Anthropology of Peace and Justice 3
      ANP 270 Women and Health: Anthropological and International Perspectives 3
      ANP 280 The Anthropological Film 3
      ANP 321 Anthropology of Social Movements 3
      ANP 325 Anthropology of the Environment and Development 3
      ANP 330 Race, Ethnicity, and Nation: Anthropological Approaches to Collective Identity 3
      ANP 410 Anthropology of Latin America 3
      ANP 426 Urban Anthropology 3
      ANP 430 Culture, Resources and Power 3
      ANP  431 Gender, Environment and Development 3
      CJ  220 Criminology 3
      CJ  355 Juvenile Justice 3
      CJ  422 Comparative and Historical Criminal Justice 3
      CJ  425 Women and Criminal Justice 3
      COM 100 Human Communication 3
      EAD  363 Diversity and Higher Education 3
      EC  495 Economics of Poverty and Income Distribution (W) 3
      EEP  260 World Food, Population and Poverty 3
      GEO  418 The Ghetto 3
      GEO  432 Environmental Ethics (W) 3
      GSAH  310 Conflict and Justice in a Global Setting 3
      GSAH  312 Media Mobility: Change, Access, Representation 3
      HST  313 Women in the United States to 1869 3
      HST  364 South Africa: From Shaka Zulu to Mandela 3
      HST  392 History of the Holocaust 3
      HST  414 World War II: Causes, Conduct and Consequences 3
      HST  420 History of Sexuality since the 18th Century 3
      HST  455 Special Topics in Modern History 3
      HST  487 Seminar in Comparative History (W) 3
      JRN  445 Images and Messages 3
      JRN  475 International News and Government Regional Dynamics 3
      MC  280 Social Theory and Social Relations 4
      MC  281 Immigrants, Minorities, and American Pluralism 4
      MC  322 International Security 4
      MC  324A  Regional Politics, Cooperation, and Conflict in the Middle East 4
      MC  324B  Regional Politics cooperation, and Conflict in Sub-Saharan Africa 4
      MC  324C  Regional Politics, Cooperation, and Conflict in Latin America and the Caribbean 4
      MC  324D  Regional Politics, Cooperation, and Conflict in Asia 4
      MC  337 Global Public Health 4
      MC  366 Film, History, and Nation 4
      MC  369 Global Issues and Citizenship (W) 4
      MC  377 Culture, Politics and Post-Colonialism 4
      MC  382 Social Movements 4
      MC  385 Comparative Race and Ethnic Relations 4
      MC  386 Women and Power in Comparative Perspective 4
      MC  387 Jews and Anti-Semitism 4
      MC  388 Sexual Politics: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 4
      MC  482 Gender and Violent Conflict 3
      PHL  291 Special Topics in Introductory Philosophy 3 to 4
      PHL  342 Environmental Ethics 3
      PHL  350 Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy 3
      PHL  351 African Philosophy 3
      PHL  354 Philosophy of Law 3
      PHL  356 Philosophical Aspects of Feminism 4
      PHL  357 Philosophy of Karl Marx 3
      PHL  358 Philosophy, Gender, and Global Development 3
      PHL  450 Liberal Theory and Its Critics 3
      PHL  451 Philosophy and the Black Experience 3
      PHL  452 Ethics and Development 3
      PHL  453 Ethical Issues in Global Public Health 3
      PHL  454 Topics in Philosophy of Law 3
      PHL  456 Topics in Feminist Philosophy 4
      PLS  160 Introduction to International Relations 3
      PLS  320 The American Judicial Process 3
      PLS  344 Politics of Developing Areas 3
      PLS  363 International Political Conflict 3
      PLS  364 Politics of the United Nations and International Organizations 3
      RCAH  203 Transcultural Relations through the Ages 4
      RCAH  390 Immersions in Language and Culture 2 to 4
      SOC  215 Race and Ethnicity 3
      SOC  216 Sex and Gender 3
      SOC  331 Political Sociology 3
      SOC  452 Environment and Society 3
      SOC  481 Social Movements and Collective Identities 3
      WRA  115 Writing: Law and Justice in the United States 4
      WRA  125 Writing: The American Ethnic and Racial Experience 4
      WRA  130 Writing: American Radical Thought 4
      WRA  140 Writing: Women in America 4
      WS  301 Sexual Violence Against Women and Children: Theory and Response 3
      WS  403 Women and Change in Developing Countries 3
3.     Completion of a Capstone Paper. This paper may derive from one of the courses completed for requirements 1. or 2. It is intended to synthesize themes the student examined in the minor. A faculty member affiliated with the Minor in Peace and Justice Studies must approve the paper and inform the undergraduate advisor for Peace and Justice Studies of its satisfactory completion.