Academic Programs Catalog

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

School of Planning, Design and Construction

Scott T. Loveridge, Acting Director


The School of Planning, Design, and Construction is jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and the College of Social Science. The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources is the primary administrative unit. The school includes the academic programs that affect the various components of the built environment – construction management, landscape architecture, interior design, and urban and regional planning. Its educational discovery and engagement programs enhance the quality of life in a sustainable manner. The school serves the needs of students, the public, and the built environment via its undergraduate and graduate programs, research, conferences, and workshops offered through various outreach programs.

The school and its programs advance the university's bolder by design mission by creating, disseminating and applying knowledge to improve the quality of life in urban, regional and international communities. It accomplishes this mission, in part, by implementing, evaluating and disseminating innovative approaches developed through multidisciplinary research and collaborative community partnerships. The school provides a collaborative learning environment for faculty and students at Michigan State University to participate in a scholarship of engagement in generating and applying knowledge to address the contemporary challenges of communities.

The school also offers a dual degree program which provides an opportunity for students who are currently accepted into the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program to enroll in graduate courses required in the Master of Arts Degree in Environmental Design while completing the last year and a half (three semesters) of their bachelor's degree program. Students interested in pursuing the dual degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture in Landscape Architecture and the Master of Arts in Environmental Design should contact the School of Planning, Design and Construction. Students are eligible to apply for admission to the dual degree program after completion of the first three years of curriculum requirements in the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture in Landscape Architecture.


Undergraduate Programs

The School of Planning, Design, and Construction exists to educate individuals for professional careers in areas impacting the built environment, spanning the life of a constructed edifice or entity, from planning, to design, and construction management. The school offers Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree programs. Individuals meeting the general University requirements for admission shown in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog are enrolled in the Undergraduate University Division but may declare a major preference in the School of Planning, Design, and Construction. Refer to the specific degree program for further details regarding junior-level admission requirements and program curriculum.

The school offers programs leading to bachelor’s degrees in the following fields:
    Construction Management
    Interior Design
    Landscape Architecture
    Urban and Regional Planning

The Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in urban and regional planning is offered through the College of Social Science. For information about this program, refer to the statement on the School of Planning, Design, and Construction in the College of Social Science section of this catalog.



Construction Management

The program is designed to provide a student with a background in managerial, technological, economic, social, political, and environmental aspects of residential and commercial construction. A systems approach is used and includes project management, construction science, land acquisition and development, real estate, finance, management, and marketing. Career opportunities include supervisory and managerial employment within commercial and residential contracting, land development, and real estate organizations; material distribution systems; financial institutions; and governmental agencies.

Admission as a Junior

Construction management builds upon a basic understanding of mathematics, physics, statistics, and economics to develop the skills necessary to manage construction projects. Prior to enrollment in the major, students must have demonstrated this basic understanding by a minimum performance in the courses listed and a minimum overall grade point average.

Enrollment in the construction management major is limited. Those seeking admission must at least meet the criteria listed below.

1. Completion of at least 56 credits.
2. Completion of the following courses with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course:
MTH 124 Survey of Calculus I 3
PHY 231 Introductory Physics I 3
STT 200 Statistical Methods 3
Or
STT 201 Statistical Methods 4
Or
STT 315 Introduction Probability and Statistics for Business 3
Or
STT 421 Statistics I 3
EC 201 Introduction to Microeconomics 3
Or
EC 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics 3
CMP 101 Principles of Construction Management 2
CMP 124 Residential Construction Materials and Methods 3
CMP 210 Commercial Construction Methods 3
CMP 211 Building Codes 3
CMP 222 Statics and Strengths of Materials 3
CMP 230 Utility Systems 4
3. Have either a cumulative grade-point average of 3.00 in the CMP courses listed in item 2. or a cumulative MSU grade-point average of 3.00.

While meeting all of the criteria above is necessary to be considered for admission to the Bachelor of Science Degree in Construction Management, it does not guarantee admission. Other factors such as work experience, personal experience, and diversity may also be considered.

For additional information about admissions criteria and procedures, students should contact the Construction Management Program in the School of Planning, Design, and Construction.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Construction Management

  1. The University requirements for bachelor's degrees as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Science degree in Construction Management.

    The University's Tier II writing requirement for the Construction Management major is met by completing Construction Management 385 or 435 or 436. Those courses are referenced in item 3. b. below.

    Students who are enrolled in the Construction Management major leading to the Bachelor of Science degree may complete an alternative track to Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences that consists of Physics 231 and 251 and one of the following choices: Biological Science 161 and 171 or Biological Science 162 and 172 or Plant Biology 105 and 106 or Microbiology and Molecular Genetics 205 and 206. The completion of Physics 251 and Biological Science 171 or 172 or Plant Biology 106 or Microbiology and Molecular Genetics 206 satisfies the laboratory requirement. With advisor approval, for this laboratory requirement, Biological Science 171 or 172,  Plant Biology 106 and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics 206 may be waived if the student completes another chemistry laboratory course or a physics laboratory course beyond Physics 251.

    Physics 231 and 251 and Biological Science 161 and 171 or 162 and 172 or  Plant Biology 105 and 106 or Microbiology and Molecular Genetics 205 and 206 may be counted toward both the alternative track and the requirements for the major referenced in item 3. below.

    The completion of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources mathematics requirement may also satisfy the University mathematics requirement.
  2. The requirements of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for the Bachelor of Science degree.

    Certain courses referenced in requirement 3. below may be counted toward College requirements as appropriate.  The completion of Mathematics 124 satisfies the College's mathematics requirement.
  3. The following requirements for the major:
    a. All of the following courses (64 credits):
    ACC 230 Survey of Accounting Concepts 3
    CMP 101 Principles of Construction Management 2
    CMP 124 Residential Construction Materials and Methods 3
    CMP 210 Commercial Construction Methods 3
    CMP 211 Building Codes 3
    CMP 230 Utility Systems 4
    CMP 305 Site Construction and Measurement 3
    CMP 311 Construction Project Scheduling 3
    CMP 315 Construction  Quantity Surveying 3
    CMP 322 Structural Systems 3
    CMP 325 Real Estate Principles and Construction Finance 4
    CMP 328 Construction Presentation Graphics and Building Information Modeling 2
    CMP 385 Construction Documents and Contracts (W) 3
    CMP 401 Construction Safety Management 3
    CMP 415 Cost Estimating and Analysis 3
    CMP 423 Construction Project Management 3
    COM 100 Human Communication 3
    CSE 101 Computing Concepts and Competencies 3
    GBL 323 Introduction to Business Law 3
    MTH 124 Survey of Calculus I 3
    PHY 231 Introductory Physics I 3
    PHY 251 Introductory Physics Laboratory I 1
    Students who pass a waiver examination will not be required to complete Computer Science and Engineering 101.
    Students must have a minimum grade-point of 2.00 in each of the following courses: CMP 305, 311, 315, 322, 325, 328, 385, 401, 415, and 423.
    b. One of the following courses (3 credits):
    CE 221 Statics 3
    CMP 222 Statics and Strengths of Materials 3
    c. One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
    CE 312 Soil Mechanics 4
    CE 471 Construction Engineering - Equipment, Methods and Planning 3
    CMP 453 Land Development 3
    CMP 491 Special Topics in Construction Management 3
    IDES 240 Computer-Aided Design for Designers 3
    LA 230 Site Construction Materials and Methods 3
    PDC 491 Special Topics 3
    UP 458 Housing and Real Estate Development 3
    d. One of the following courses (3 credits):
    CMP 435 Residential Building and Development Projects (W) 3
    CMP 436 Commercial Building Projects (W) 3
    CMP 492 Capstone Project Competitions 3
    CMP 493 Professional Internship in Building Construction Management 3
    e. Complete four credits from the following courses:
    CEM 141 General Chemistry 4
    CEM 161 Chemistry Laboratory I 1
    PHY 232 Introductory Physics II 3
    PHY 252 Introductory Physics Laboratory II 1
    f. Complete one of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
    COM 225 An Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3
    COM 240 Introduction to Organizational Communication 4
    ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing 3
    ENG 232 Writing as Exploration 3
    g. One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
    STT 200 Statistical Methods 3
    STT 201 Statistical Methods 4
    STT 315 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Business 3
    STT 421 Statistics I 3
    h. One of the following courses (3 credits):
    EC 201 Introduction to Microeconomics 3
    EC 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics 3
    i. One of the following courses (3 credits):
    FI 320 Introduction to Finance 3
    MKT 327 Introduction to Marketing 3
    SCM 303 Introduction to Supply Chain Management 3
    j. Complete the following course (3 credits):
    MGT 325 Management Skills and Processes 3


Interior Design

This major provides academic preparation designed to enable the graduate to enter the profession of interior design. The program has been accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA).

Emphasis is placed on learning the means of satisfying functional and aesthetic requirements appropriate for a variety of specific interior spatial uses. Consideration is given to the human being and the micro–environment in the total complex of environmental relationships. The combination of courses and experiences provides students an opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, and insights needed to solve design problems creatively and effectively.

Students meeting the university admissions requirements are enrolled as freshmen and sophomores in the Neighborhood Student Success Collaborative but may declare a major preference for Interior Design.

Admission as a Junior

The number of students admitted as juniors to the major in interior design is limited. To be considered for admission, a student must have:

  1. An all–university grade–point average of 2.50 or better.
  2. A grade–point average of 3.00 or better in the following courses: Interior Design 140, 142, 150, 152, 240, 250, 252, and Apparel and Textile Design 231. Those courses are referenced in item 3. a. below in the Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Interior Design.

In addition, transfer students must have previous design work evaluated by the department prior to placements in required courses.

Selective admissions are made at the end of spring semester for Michigan State University and transfer students from those students who have met the criteria referenced above and who have completed Interior Design 252. The final selection of students to be admitted to the major is based on the cumulative grade–point average of all courses taken and a grade–point average calculated for selected courses and portfolio review by faculty members. In addition, factors such as  diversity and residency may be considered.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Interior Design

  1. The University requirements for bachelor's degrees as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Arts degree in Interior Design.

    The University's Tier II writing requirement for the Interior Design major is met by completing Interior Design 340, 440, 442, and 452.  Those courses are referenced in item 3. a. below.

    The completion of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources mathematics requirement may also satisfy the University mathematics requirement.
  2. The completion of the requirements of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for the Bachelor of Arts degree.
  3. The following requirements for the major:
    a. All of the following courses in the School of Planning, Design and Construction (62 credits):
    ATD 231 Textile Materials 4
    IDES 140 Design for Living 3
    IDES 142 Design Theory Studio 3
    IDES 150 Interior Design Drafting 3
    IDES 152 Interior Environments 4
    IDES 240 Computer–Aided Design for Designers 3
    IDES 250 CAD and Structural Systems 3
    IDES 252 Interior Design Synthesis I 4
    IDES 340 Interior Design Specifications and Workroom Practices 3
    IDES 342 Interior Design:  Human Dimensions 3
    IDES 343 Interior Design Presentation and Media 3
    IDES 344 History of Interior Design: Ancient Through Rococo 3
    IDES 350 Interior Design Lighting and Environmental Systems 3
    IDES 352 Interior Design Synthesis II 4
    IDES 354 History of Interior Design:  Neo–Classical Through Modern 3
    IDES 393 Introduction to Professional Practice 1
    IDES 440 Contemporary Design Issues 2
    IDES 441 Interior Design Open Office Systems 1
    IDES 442 Interior Design Programming 3
    IDES 451 Interior Design Professional Practice 2
    IDES 452 Interior Design Synthesis III 4
    b. The following course (3 credits):
    CSE 101 Computing Concepts and Competencies 3
    Students who pass a waiver examination will not be required to complete Computer Science and Engineering 101. An approved computer skills course may be substituted for CSE 101.
    c.  The following course (5 credits):
    MTH 116 College Algebra and Trigonometry 5
    d. One of the following courses (3 credits):
    EC 201 Introduction to Microeconomics 3
    EC 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics 3
    e. Any one of the following History of Art options (6 to 9 credits):
    (1) Any two History of Art courses (6 to 9 credits).
    (2) Any one History of Art course (3 or 4 credits), and Study Abroad through enrollment in IDES 490 Independent Study (3 to 5 credits).
    (3) Any one History of Art course (3 to 4 credits) and IDES 456 Historic Preservation and Sustainability (3 credits)


Landscape Architecture

The undergraduate Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program provides a diverse learning experience which strives for a balance among philosophy, theory, and application of concepts related to past, present, and future problem–solving in landscape architecture and allied environmental planning and design professions.

The program includes professional courses in design theory and graphic communications, environmental perception, history, and plant materials and their uses; technical aspects of site development, design applications for representative land uses; site planning for typical projects; community planning, housing and recreational development; and urban and regional design and planning.

The program offers meaningful design opportunities and challenges within the classroom and on community projects, which prepare the student to communicate through writing, speech and graphics. These objectives are met in group and in individual assignments where independent study and growth are encouraged.

The program in landscape architecture at Michigan State University has been accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) since 1952.

Honors Study

Students interested in honors programs in landscape architecture should consult with an academic advisor.

Admission as a Junior

The number of students who can be admitted as juniors to the landscape architecture major is limited. To be considered for admission as a junior, a student must have completed the core courses referenced in item 2. below. Students who have been admitted as juniors are entitled to enroll in upper-level landscape architecture courses required for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree.

To be admitted to the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program, the following factors will be taken into consideration:  (1) overall MSU grade-point average; (2) grade-point average in all landscape architecture courses; (3) evidence of creative works and service; and (4) a written essay.

Admissions are determined by the faculty on the basis of the relative qualifications of applicants and the enrollment capacity in the program. Admission is competitive.

Detailed information regarding admission requirements and procedures is available from the School of Planning, Design and Construction, Associate Director.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Degree in Landscape Architecture

  1. The University requirements for bachelor's degrees as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 130 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree in Landscape Architecture.

    Students who are enrolled in the Landscape Architecture major leading to the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree in the School of Planning, Design and Construction may complete an alternative track to Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences that consists of the following courses:  Plant Biology 105 and 106, and Chemistry 141 and 161.  The completion of Plant Biology 106 and Chemistry 161  satisfies the laboratory requirement.  Plant Biology 105 and 106, and Chemistry 141 and 161 may be counted toward both the alternative track and the requirements for the major referenced in item 2. below.

    The completion of Mathematics 116 referenced in requirement 2. below may also satisfy the University mathematics requirement.

    The University's Tier II writing requirement for the Landscape Architecture major is met by completing Landscape Architecture 480.  That course is referenced in item 2. c. below.
  2. The following requirements for the major:
                   
    a. A  minimum grade–point average of 2.00 in the 42 credits required in 300–400 level Landscape Architecture courses referenced in requirement 2.c. below.  
    b. Collateral Courses (36 credits):  
      (1) All of the following courses (33 credits):  
        CEM 141 General Chemistry 4
        CEM 161 Chemistry Laboratory I 1
        HRT 211 Landscape Plants I1 3
        HRT 212 Landscape Plants II1 3
        HRT 311 Landscape Design and Management Specifications 4
        ISS 310 People and the Environment (I)1 4
        MTH 116 College Algebra and Trigonometry1 5
        PDC 120 Planning and Design Digital Graphics1 2
        PLB 105 Plant Biology1 3
        PLB 106 Plant Biology Laboratory1 1
        UP 424 Geographic Information Systems and Design Tools for Planning 3
      (2)

    Students must demonstrate AutoCAD proficiency through transfer credit, waiver or completion of the following course (0 to 3 credits)1:

     
        IDES 240 Computer-Aided Design for Designers 3
    c. Landscape Architecture Courses:  All of the following courses (61 credits):  
      LA 140 Graphics and Two-Dimensional Design Studio1 4
      LA 141 Graphics and Three-Dimensional Design Studio1 4
      LA 200 Introduction to Landscape Architecture1 3
      LA 230 Site Construction Materials and Methods1 4
      LA 231 Landscape Site Engineering1 4
      LA 242 Creating Space Studio1 4
      LA 243 Place Making Studio1 4
      LA 332 Advanced Landscape Site Engineering 4
      LA 344 Connections of Scale Studio 5
      LA 345 Design Development Studio 5
      LA 390 Landscape Architecture Field Studies 3
      LA 421 Drawing as Knowing 4
      LA 447 Juried Design Studio 5
      LA 448 Regional Environmental Design Studio 2
      LA 449 Landscape Architecture Design Studio 3
      LA 480 Professional Practice (W) 3
    d. One of the following courses (3 credits):  
      EC 201 Introduction to Microeconomics 3
      EC 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics 3
    e. Directed Electives (14 credits):  
     

    A minimum of 14 additional credits in courses approved by the student's academic advisor. Courses that are used to satisfy the University Integrative Studies and writing requirements may not be used to satisfy this requirement. Courses used to satisfy the AutoCAD proficiency requirement referenced in item 2 b. (2) above may not be used to satisfy this requirement.

     

1Core course that must be completed in order for a student to be considered for admission to the major.

Dual Degree Program: Bachelor of Landscape Architecture in Landscape Architecture and Master of Arts in Environmental Design

The dual degree program provides an opportunity for students who are currently accepted into the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program to enroll in graduate courses required in the Master of Arts Degree in Environmental Design while completing the last year and a half (three semesters) of their bachelor’s degree program.

Students interested in pursuing the dual degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture in Landscape Architecture and the Master of Arts in Environmental Design should contact the School of Planning, Design and Construction. Students are eligible to apply for admission to the dual degree program after completion of the first two years of curriculum requirements in the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture in Landscape Architecture. Admission to Master of Arts in Environmental Design must be approved before beginning graduate-level course work in the fourth year of the bachelor’s degree program. Upon completion of the requirements for both the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree and the Master of Arts degree, both degrees are awarded simultaneously. The Master of Arts degree will not be awarded until the student has completed the requirements for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree.

To be admitted to the dual degree program, the following factors will be taken into consideration:

  1. Overall MSU grade-point average.
  2. Grade-point average in all landscape architecture courses.
  3. Evidence of creative works and service.
  4. A written essay.

Admission is competitive and enrollment is limited for each entering class. Students who are not selected for admission into the dual degree program will be advised of other degree options. Students may reapply for admission during the following admissions cycle.

A student who is admitted to the dual degree program must:

  1. Satisfy all of the requirements for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree program to which the student was originally admitted.
  2. Satisfy all of the requirements for the Master of Arts degree in Environmental Design.

Students admitted to the dual degree program will apply 9 credits of course work toward the master’s program for qualifying 400-level and above course work taken at the undergraduate level at Michigan State University. The 9 credits are applied toward the credit requirement of the master’s degree.


 

 

 


Graduate Study

Graduate study may lead to a Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Urban and Regional Planning or Doctor of Philosophy degree. The School has expertise and facilities available for advanced study and research in the following areas: Environmental Design; Planning, Design and Construction; and Urban and Regional Planning. The School offers programs leading to graduate degrees in the following fields:

Master of Arts
    Environmental Design
Master of Science
    Construction Management
Master of International Planning Studies
    International Planning Studies
Master of Urban and Regional Planning
    Urban and Regional Planning
Doctor of Philosophy
    Planning, Design and Construction

The Master of International Planning Studies degree program with a major in international planning studies and the Master of Urban and Regional Planning degree program with a major in urban and regional planning are offered through the College of Social Science. For information about those programs, refer to the statement on the School of Planning, Design, and Construction in the College of Social Science section of this catalog.


Construction Management - Master of Science

The Master of Science degree program with a major in construction management is designed to provide breadth in the managerial, technological, economic, and environmental aspects of construction.  The program is also designed to provide depth through a systems approach encompassing project management, estimating, scheduling and project controls, land acquisition and development, architectural and engineering design, construction technology, real estate, finance, business management, and marketing.

The master’s program in construction management is available under either Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (without thesis).  Students who anticipate careers in teaching, consulting, or research, or who plan to pursue a doctoral program, are encouraged to select Plan A.  After the student’s academic advisor has approved the student’s program of study under Plan A, the student may not pursue the program under Plan B without the approval of the school.

Students who are enrolled in the master’s program in construction management often take courses in business management, labor and industrial relations, civil engineering, human environment and design, resource development, urban planning, statistics, or education, in addition to courses in the major.  Students may work directly with one or more faculty members on an independent basis to cover material that is not available through regular courses.

Master of Science

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the master's degree program in construction management, an applicant must take the Graduate Record Examination General Test and have the scores submitted to the department.

To be admitted to the program on regular status, an applicant must:

  1. Have a Bachelor of Science degree in construction management or in a related area such as architecture, business, design, engineering, management, or urban planning.
  2. Have a cumulative grade–point average of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) for the undergraduate program.
  3. Have experience in the construction industry acceptable to the department.
  4. Have completed as part of the undergraduate program 3 semester credits of introductory calculus (MTH 124 Survey of Calculus I or its equivalent); 3 semester credits of introductory physics (PHY 231 Introductory Physics I or its equivalent).

Applicants who have not completed the credits referenced in item 4. above may be admitted on provisional status. In addition, students may be required to complete specified collateral courses, from the following list, with a grade-point average of at least 3.00. These courses will not count toward the degree. The guidance committee will determine which courses are required as collateral courses for each applicant.

One of the following courses:
CMP 124 Residential Construction Materials and Methods
CMP 210 Commercial Construction Methods
One of the following courses:
CMP 305 Site Construction and Measurements
CMP 315 Construction Quantity Surveying
One or more of the following courses:
CMP 222 Statics and Strengths of Materials
CMP 322 Structural Systems
CSE 101 Computing Concepts and Competencies
Business, management or economics course

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Construction Management

The student must complete a total of 30 credits for the degree under Plan A (with thesis) or 33 credits for the degree under Plan B (without thesis). For students who elect independent study courses, including Construction Management 890, no more than 6 credits under Plan A and 9 credits under Plan B may be counted toward the requirements for the degree. The student’s program of study must be approved by the student’s academic advisor and must meet the requirements specified below:

               
Requirements for Plan A   
1. A minimum of 18 credits in 800–900 level courses.  
2. All of the following courses:  
  CMP 817 Construction Management Information Systems 3
  CMP 822 Legal Issues in Construction 3
  CMP 892 Construction Management Research Seminar 2
3. One additional 800-level Construction Management courses, excluding Construction Management 890, 898, and 899. Students without a background in construction project scheduling and estimating must complete Construction Management 811 and 815 in partial fulfillment of this requirement.  
4. One graduate course in research methods.  
5. One 400-level course or above in statistics.  
Additional Requirements for Plan A  
1. Complete 6 credits of Construction Management 899. No more than 6 credits may be counted toward the requirements for the degree under Plan A.  
2. Complete and defend a master’s thesis acceptable to the student’s guidance committee.  
Requirements for Plan B  
1. A minimum of 24 credits in 800-900 level courses.  
2. All of the following courses:  
  CMP 817 Construction Management Information Systems 3
  CMP 822 Legal Issues in Construction 3
  CMP 892 Construction Management Research Seminar 2
3. One additional 800-level Construction Management course, excluding Construction Management 890, 898, and 899. Students without a background in construction project scheduling and estimating must complete Construction Management 811 and 815 in partial fulfillment of this requirement.  
4. One 400-level course or above in statistics.  
Additional Requirements for Plan B  
1. Successful completion of a final examination given by the guidance committee.  

Transfer Credits

No more than 9 semester credits of graduate course work (excluding research and thesis credits) may be transferred from other recognized educational institutions.



Environmental Design - Master of Arts

The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources in cooperation with the Landscape Architecture program and the Interior Design program in the School of Planning, Design and Construction and the Departments of Horticulture and Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies participate in the Master of Arts degree in Environmental Design. The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources is the primary administrative unit..

The purpose of this master’s degree is to train prospective or practicing professionals to address the complex interdisciplinary nature of environmental design. Students will develop a highly individualized plan of study with a focus in a relevant design area such as golf course architecture, landscape reclamation, visual quality modeling, landscape restoration, interiorscapes, wellness/therapeutic garden design, landscape development systems, plant management systems, adaptive reuse of facilities for tourism and recreation, park safety design and development, and park and tourism development and design within ecological systems.

The Master of Arts Degree in Environmental Design addresses four areas of professional development. These include:

  1. acquisition of in-depth knowledge in the area of environmental design theory;
  2. development of problem-solving skills within an interdisciplinary professional context;
  3. development of technological expertise and a knowledge base in a selected area of environmental design; and
  4. a greater command of graphic, written, and oral communication skills.

All students will take a core of three courses in environmental design (theory, seminar, and studio), in addition to either a Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (without thesis). Students will elect relevant courses in fields which pertain to their design area of interest.

The program is planned to provide an alternative to traditional professional degrees by addressing the needs of students with undergraduate design backgrounds who wish to work in an interdisciplinary setting while pursuing an area of individual interest.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Master of Arts in Environmental Design, the applicant must have:

  1. completed a bachelor’s degree in a design related field such as horticulture, park and recreation, interior design, landscape architecture, or architecture.
  2. a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 in design and technology courses with an academic background sufficient to indicate probable success in the program.
  3. satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination General Test (GRE) as judged by the environmental design faculty. No substantive area GRE examinations are required.
  4. acceptance as an advisee by a participating environmental design faculty member.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree in Environmental Design

Students in the Master of Arts in Environmental Design must complete a total of 33 credits for the degree under either Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (without thesis). A minimum of 17 of those credits must be at the 800-level or above, distributed as follows:

               
1. All of the following core courses (12 credits):  
  IDES 891 Topics in Interior Design and Human Environment 3
  LA 816 Environmental Design Theory 3
  LA 817 Environmental Design Studio 3
  LA 883 Environmental Design Seminar 3
2. Guided elective courses related to the student’s area of design interest, chosen in consultation with the student’s academic advisor.  

For Plan A , students must complete a minimum of 6 and a maximum of 9 credits of Master’s Thesis Research (899) in one of the following departments: Planning, Design and Construction; Horticulture;  or Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies. They must also prepare a written thesis and pass an oral examination.

For Plan B, students must complete 6 credits of Master’s Research (898) in one of the following departments: Planning, Design and Construction; Horticulture;  or Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies. They must also complete either a major planning or design project or pass a comprehensive examination.




Planning, Design and Construction - Doctor of Philosophy

The many aspects of our built and natural environment – buildings, facilities, interior spaces, infrastructure, neighborhoods, and communities – are an integral part of our society. Every new space and structure serves to define and shape a community’s personality. Poor planning design and/or construction can compromise a community’s appearance and drain its resources. Conversely, well-planned, designed and constructed environments sustain and enrich a community.

The Doctor of Philosophy in Planning, Design and Construction with a concentration in construction management, environmental design, or urban and regional planning will enable students to meet future challenges. Graduates of this program will possess the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the effects of plans, regulations, design, materials, project management techniques, and construction systems on the economic, environmental, and social concerns of stakeholders and society.

Admission

To be considered for regular admission to the Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Planning, Design and Construction, an applicant must have all of the following:

  1. A master’s degree in a related field.
  2. A cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale.
  3. GRE scores no lower than 301 in combined verbal and quantitative and at least 4.0 analytical.
  4. TOEFL scores (for international applicants):
    1. Paper-based – no lower than 575 (with no sub scores below 52)
    2. Computer-based – no lower than 235 (with no sub scores below 19)
    3. Internet-based – no lower than 90 (with no sub scores below 19 for reading, listening, and   speaking, and no writing sub score below 22)

Additionally, students are encouraged to submit a sample of scholarly work or a portfolio of design work. Depending on the proposed area of concentration, the school may ask for  additional background information.

Provisional admission may be granted to an applicant who does not meet the above requirements but demonstrates outstanding potential. Collateral course work will not count  towards degree requirements.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Agriculture  and Natural Resources and the College of Social Science, the student must meet the requirements specified below.

Guidance Committee

The guidance committee should be comprised of at least four faculty members. The chairperson and one other committee member should be from the student’s area of concentration within the School, a third member can be from the student’s area of concentration or another area of concentration within the School, and a fourth member must be from outside the school.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Planning, Design and Construction

The student must:

               
1. Complete 9 credits in the following core courses:  
  PDC 901 Integrated Approach to Planning, Design and Construction
  PDC 992 Advanced Research Methods in Planning, Design and Construction
  An advanced statistics course or other related course 3
2. Complete a minimum of four additional courses related to the area of concentration as specified by the student’s guidance committee. Concentration areas include: construction management, environmental design, or urban and regional planning. 12 
3. Pass both a written and oral comprehensive examination.  
4. Complete 24 credits of Planning, Design and Construction 999. 24
5. Complete and successfully defend a dissertation in an area related to the area of concentration.