Academic Programs Catalog

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Undergraduate Programs

The department offers Bachelor of Science degree programs with majors in Dietetics, Food Science, and in Nutritional Sciences.  Additional information describing career opportunities for each of these majors may be found in the sections below. Minors in Beverage Science and Technology, and in Food Processing and Technology are also available.

Students who are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in food science may elect a Minor in Plant, Animal, and Microbial Biotechnology.  For additional information, refer to the Minor in Plant, Animal, and Microbial Biotechnology statement.

Dietetics

The undergraduate program in dietetics has been approved by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic's Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) as a Didactic Program that meets the minimum academic requirements for professionally qualified dietitians.

The undergraduate program in dietetics is designed so that supporting disciplines provide a knowledge base prerequisite to the professional courses. Course offerings are sequenced to build upon previous knowledge and provide increasingly complex experiences. The student is expected to acquire approximately equal expertise in nutritional assessment and care and in foodservice management systems.

Verification of successful completion of the ACEND-approved minimum academic requirements is the responsibility of the Dietetic Program Director in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition.

Persons who wish to receive a final Verification Statement for the fulfillment of ACEND-approved minimum academic requirements from Michigan State University, but who have not completed a Bachelor of Science degree with a Dietetics major at Michigan State University, must complete a minimum of 10 credits in 300—400 level courses in dietetics at Michigan State University with a minimum grade of 2.0 or better in each course.

Eligibility for the Registration Examination for Dietitians is determined by verification of successful completion of an ACEND-approved Didactic Program in Dietetics and one of the following supervised practice experiences:  ACEND-approved Dietetic Internship, or ACEND-approved Accredited Coordinated Program. Dietetic registration, as administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration, is a requirement of most positions for professional dietitians.

Admission as a Junior

Enrollment in the dietetics major is limited. The Bachelor of Science Degree in Dietetics is a professional degree, which requires acceptance into a competitive internship in order to complete the requirements for eligibility to take the registered dietitian examination. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5 is necessary to be considered for admission.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Dietetics

  1. The University requirements for bachelor's degrees as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog.

    The University's Tier II writing requirement for the Dietetics major is met by completing Human Nutrition and Foods 300, 471 and 472.  Those courses are referenced in item 3. a. below.

    Students who are enrolled in the Dietetics major leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition may complete an alternative track to Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences that consists of the following courses:  Biochemistry 200 or Physiology 250; Chemistry 141, 143, and 161. The completion of Chemistry 143 and 161 satisfies the laboratory requirement.
  2. The requirements of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees.
  3. The following requirements for the major:
    a. All of the following courses in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
    (42 credits):
    HNF 150 Introduction to Human Nutrition 3
    HNF 300 Experimental Approaches to Foods 4
    HNF 320 Professional Practice of Dietetics and Nutrition 3
    HNF 350 Advanced Human Nutrition and Metabolism 4
    HNF 377 Applied Community Nutrition 4
    HNF 400 Art and Science of Food Preparation 2
    HNF 406 Global Foods and Culture 3
    HNF 440 Foodservice Operations 3
    HNF 444 The Business of Nutrition Services 3
    HNF 445 Foodservice Management Practicum 2
    HNF 453 Nutrition and Human Development 3
    HNF 471 Medical Nutrition Therapy I 4
    HNF 472 Medical Nutrition Therapy II 4
    b. The following courses outside the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition (39 to 42 credits):
    (1) All of the following courses (30 credits):
    ANTR 350 Human Gross Anatomy for Pre-Health Professionals 3
    BMB 200 Introduction to Biochemistry 4
    CEM 141 General Chemistry 4
    CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry 4
    CEM 161 Chemistry Laboratory I 1
    FSC 342 Food Safety and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point Program 3
    MGT 325 Management Skills and Processes 3
    PSL 250 Introductory Physiology  4
    PSY 101 Introductory Psychology 4
    (2) One of the following courses (3 or 5 credits):
    MTH 103 College Algebra 3
    MTH 116 College Algebra and Trigonometry 5
    (3) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
    STT 200 Statistical Methods 3
    STT 201 Statistical Methods 4
    (4) The following course (3 credits):
    CSE 101 Computing Concepts and Competencies 3
    Students who pass a waiver examination will not be required to complete Computer Science and Engineering 101.


Food Science

Graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in food science may be employed by food and allied industries, federal and state governments, and universities to work at the interface between the production and delivery of food. The program also prepares students for advanced study in graduate and professional schools. The required courses stress the principles of food safety and preservation and the application of scientific principles to control and enhance the flavor, color, texture, and nutritive value.

In addition to the core program, students in food science must complete one of the following interdisciplinary concentrations that are designed to provide additional breadth and depth: basic food science, food business and industry, food packaging, or food technology.

Basic Food Science. This concentration is designed for students with an interest in integrating in-depth study of basic sciences with the core of their food science education. Advanced courses in chemistry, microbiology, food safety, toxicology and pharmacology are among the fields students may elect to strengthen their bachelor's degree. Students interested in professional post-graduate education such as medicine and dentistry may elect to take a series of courses that meets the admission standards for most professional colleges.

Food Business and Industry. This concentration is designed for students who are interested in working for food or food-related businesses, where a knowledge of both food science and of food business management, economics, and marketing is important.  Students who complete this concentration may pursue careers in manufacturing management, technical sales, food product marketing, or similar areas or may pursue graduate study in business.

Food Packaging.  This concentration is designed to prepare students for careers in the food industry with an emphasis in food packaging. The concentration focuses on the design, use, and evaluation of food packaging materials and the effect of packaging materials on the shelf life of food.  Students who complete this concentration may pursue graduate study in packaging or food science.

Food Technology.  This concentration focuses on food processing  methods and their effect on food quality and process characteristics.  Students who complete this concentration may pursue careers in production supervision, quality assurance, inspection, product development, and process development.  They may also pursue graduate study to prepare for positions in research, production, and management in the food industry, government, or universities.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Food Science

  1. The University requirements for bachelor's degrees as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Science degree in Food Science.

    The University's Tier II writing requirement for the Food Science major is met by completing all of the following courses:  Food Science 402, 440, 441, 455, 470. Those courses are referenced in item 3.a. below.

    Students who are enrolled in the Food Science major leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition may complete an alternative track to Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences that consists of the following courses: Biological Science 161, Chemistry 161 and 162, and Physics 231. The completion of Chemistry 161 and 162 satisfies the laboratory requirement. Biological Science 161, Chemistry 161 and 162  and Physics 231 may be counted toward both the alternative track and the requirements for the major referenced in item 3. below.

    The completion of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources mathematics requirement may also satisfy the University mathematics requirement.
  2. The requirements of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for the Bachelor of Science degree.

    Certain courses referenced in requirement 3. below may be counted toward College requirements as appropriate.  The completion of Mathematics 124 satisfies the College's mathematics requirement.
  3. The following requirements for the major:
    a. All of the following courses (54 credits):
    BE 429 Fundamentals of Food Engineering 3
    BS 161 Cell and Molecular Biology 3
    CEM 141 General Chemistry 4
    CEM 142 General and Inorganic Chemistry 3
    CEM 161 Chemistry Laboratory I 1
    CEM 162 Chemistry Laboratory II 1
    FSC 211 Principles of Food Science 3
    FSC 222 Professional Development and Career Planning in Food Science 1
    FSC 310 Sensory Analysis and Consumer Research 3
    FSC 325 Food Processing: Unit Operations 3
    FSC 401 Food Chemistry 3
    FSC 402 Food Chemistry Laboratory 1
    FSC 422 Advanced Professional Seminar in Food Science 1
    FSC 440 Food Microbiology 3
    FSC 441 Food Microbiology Laboratory 2
    FSC 442 Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point Training and Certification 1
    FSC 455 Food and Nutrition Laboratory 3
    FSC 470 Integrated Approaches to Food Product Development 3
    HNF 150 Introduction to Human Nutrition 3
    MMG 301 Introductory Microbiology 3
    MTH 124 Survey of Calculus I 3
    PHY 231 Introductory Physics I 3
    b. One of the following courses (3 credits):
    FSC 430 Food Processing: Fruits and Vegetables 3
    FSC 431 Food Processing: Cereals 3
    c. One of the following courses (3 credits):
    FSC 432 Food Processing: Dairy Foods 3
    FSC 433 Food Processing: Muscle Foods 3
    d. One of the following concentrations (23 to 26 credits):
    Basic Food Science (25 credits):
    (1) All of the following courses (16 credits):
    BMB 401 Comprehensive Biochemistry 4
    CEM 251 Organic Chemistry I 3
    CEM 252 Organic Chemistry II 3
    CEM 255 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2
    STT 201 Statistical Methods 4
    (2) Nine credits from the following courses (9 credits):
    ANS 407 Food and Animal Toxicology 3
    CEM 262 Quantitative Analysis 3
    CEM 333 Instrumental Methods and Applications 3
    CEM 383 Introductory Physical Chemistry I 3
    FSC 421 Food Laws and Regulations 3
    MMG 409 Eukaryotic Cell Biology 3
    MMG 425 Microbial Ecology 3
    MMG 431 Microbial Genetics 3
    MMG 445 Microbial Biotechnology (W) 3
    MMG 451 Immunology 3
    PHM 350 Introductory Human Pharmacology 3
    PHM 450 Introduction to Chemical Toxicology 3
    PHY 232 Introductory Physics II 3
    The Basic Food Science concentration fills many, but not all, of the minimum requirements for admission to professional schools. Students interested in preparing for post-graduate professional programs should consult with a preprofessional advisor in the College of Natural Science. Admission requirements of professional schools vary and the student is responsible for reviewing  the requirements of each school of interest and consulting regularly with an advisor.
    Food Business and Industry (23 credits):
    (1) All of the following courses (17 credits):
    ACC 230 Survey of Accounting Concepts 3
    BMB 200 Introduction to Biochemistry 4
    CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry 4
    MKT 327 Introduction to Marketing 3
    STT 315 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Business 3
    (2) Two of the following courses (6 credits):
    ABM 100 Decision-making in the Agri-Food System 3
    ABM 222 Agribusiness and Food Industry Sales (W) 3
    ABM 435 Financial Management in the Agri-Food System 3
    FI 311 Financial Management 3
    FIM 335 Food Marketing Management 3
    MKT 302 Consumer and Organizational Buyer Behavior 3
    Either Finance 311 or Agribusiness Management 435, but not both of those courses, may be used to satisfy  requirement (2) for the Food Business and Industry concentration.
    Food Packaging (26 credits):
    (1) All of the following courses:
    BMB 200 Introduction to Biochemistry 4
    CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry 4
    PKG 101 Principles of Packaging 3
    PKG 221 Packaging with Glass and Metal 3
    PKG 322 Packaging with Paper and Paperboard 4
    PKG 323 Packaging with Plastics 4
    STT 201 Statistical Methods 4
    Food Technology (23 credits):
    (1) All of the following courses (14 credits):
    BMB 200 Introduction to Biochemistry 4
    CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry 4
    FSC 420 Quality Assurance 2
    STT 201 Statistical Methods 4
    (2) Nine credits from the following courses (9 credits):
    CEM 482 Science and Technology of Wine Production 3
    CHE 483 Brewing and Distilled Beverage Technology 3
    FSC 430 Food Processing: Fruits and Vegetables 3
    FSC 431 Food Processing: Cereals 3
    FSC 432 Food Processing: Dairy Foods 3
    FSC 421 Food Laws and Regulations 3
    FSC 433 Food Processing: Muscle Foods 3
    FSC 481 Fermented Beverages 3
    HB 100 Introduction to Hospitality Business 2
    HB 265 Food Management: Safety and Nutrition 3
    HB 267 Management of Food and Beverage Systems 3
    HB 409 Introduction to Wine 3
    HNF 300 Experimental Approaches to Food 4
    HRT 403 Handling and Storage of Horticultural Crops 3
    HRT 430 Exploring Wines and Vines 3
    Courses selected to meet this requirement may not be used to fulfill requirement 3. c. above.


Nutritional Sciences

The nutritional sciences major emphasizes intensive study in biological and physical sciences as a basis for understanding the science of nutrition and the relationships between nutrients and human health. Core course requirements emphasize human nutrition with areas of study in energy metabolism, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and nutrition in the prevention and treatment of disease. Issues and techniques involved in nutrition research, and a food and nutrition laboratory course are included in the core courses. Supporting discipline courses emphasize biochemistry, biology, chemistry, mathematics, microbiology, physics and physiology.

This major offers the opportunity to concentrate in one of three areas. The biomedical nutrition concentration is designed to meet the admissions requirements of most colleges of medicine, dentistry and paramedical colleges while the student pursues a bachelor's degree in a clinically related area. The global nutrition and health concentration emphasizes the international aspects of nutrition within the context of sustainability, policy, food security, and agricultural systems. The public health nutrition concentration allows students to develop skills in biostatistics, epidemiology, and program planning and evaluation, in the context of nutrition and population health. The major also prepares students to enter graduate school programs in nutrition and other life sciences. Graduates in nutritional sciences qualify for positions in the food industry, corporate wellness and health promotion programs, public health programs, pharmaceutical sales and similar occupations.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nutritional Sciences

  1. The University requirements for bachelor's degrees as described in the Undergraduate Education  section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Science degree in Nutritional Sciences.

    The University's Tier II writing requirement for the Nutritional Sciences major is met by completing Human Nutrition and Foods 450. This course is referenced in item 3. below.

    Students who are enrolled in the Nutritional Sciences major leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition may complete an alternative track to Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences that consists of the following courses:  Chemistry 141, 161; Biological Science 161 and 171.  The completion of Chemistry 161 and Biological Science 171 satisfies the laboratory requirement.
     
  2. The requirements of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for the Bachelor of Science degree.

    The credits earned in certain courses referenced in item 3. below may be counted toward college requirements as appropriate.

    The completion of Mathematics 124 or 132 or Lyman Briggs 118 satisfies the college mathematics requirement.
    1. The following requirements for the major:
      a.  The following courses (41 to 43 credits):
      (1)  All of the following courses (25 credits):
      COM 100 Human Communication 3
      CSS 124 Introduction to Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems 2
      FSC 211 Principles of Food Science 3
      FSC 455 Food and Nutrition Laboratory 3
      HNF 150 Introduction to Human Nutrition 3
      HNF 250 Contemporary Issues in Human Nutrition 3
      HNF 250L Professional Development and Career Planning in Nutrition 1
      HNF 350 Advanced Human Nutrition and Metabolism 4
      HNF 450 Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease 3
      (2) One of the following, either (a) or (b) (5 credits):
      (a) BS 161 Cell and Molecular Biology 3
      BS 171 Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory 2
      (b) LB 145 Biology II: Cellular and Molecular Biology 5
      (3) One course from each of the following groups (a) and (b) (5 or 6 credits):
      (a) CEM 141 General Chemistry 4
      CEM 151 General and Descriptive Chemistry 4
      CEM 181H Honors Chemistry I 4
      LB 171 Principles of Chemistry I 1
      (b) CEM 161 Chemistry Laboratory I 1
      CEM 185H Honors Chemistry Laboratory I 2
      LB 171L Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I 1
      (4) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
      MTH 124 Survey of Calculus I 3
      MTH 132 Calculus I 3
      LB 118 Calculus I 4
      (5) Completion of a minimum of 3 credits in Experiential Learning. Students must consult with their academic advisor for specific details on this requirement. Completion of this requirement may be fulfilled by enrollment in ANR 475, HNF 490, HNF 490H, HNF 494 or any approved study abroad, service, or research experience.
      b. One of the following concentrations:
      Biomedical and Molecular Nutrition (40 to 50 credits):
      (1) One of the following, either (a) or (b) (4 or 6 credits):
      (a) BMB 401 Comprehensive Biochemistry 4
      (b) BMB 461 Advanced Biochemistry I 3
      BMB 462 Advanced Biochemistry II 3
      (2) One of the following, either (a) or (b) (8 credits):
      (a) LB 273 Physics I 4
      LB 274 Physics II 4
      (b) PHY 231 Introductory Physics I 3
      PHY 232 Introductory Physics II 3
      PHY 251 Introductory Physics Laboratory I 1
      PHY 252 Introductory Physics Laboratory II 1
      (3) All of the following courses (11 credits):
      CEM 251 Organic Chemistry I 3
      CEM 252 Organic Chemistry II 3
      CEM 255 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2
      HNF 310 Nutrition in Medicine for Pre-Health Professionals 3
      (4) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
      STT 201 Statistical Methods 4
      STT 231 Statistics for Scientists 3
      (5) One course from each of the following groups (4 or 5 credits):
      (a) CEM 142 General and Inorganic Chemistry 3
      CEM 152 Principles of Chemistry 3
      CEM 182H Honors Chemistry II 4
      LB 172 Principles of Chemistry II 3
      (b) CEM 162 Chemistry Laboratory II 1
      LB 172L Principles of Chemistry II – Reactivity Laboratory 1
      (6) One of the following, either (a) or (b) (4 or 8 credits):
      (a) PSL 310 Physiology for Pre-Health Professionals 4
      (b) PSL 431 Human Physiology I 4
      PSL 432 Human Physiology II 4
      (7) Two of the following courses (6 to 8 credits):
      ANTR 350 Human Gross Anatomy for Pre-Health Professionals 3
      CEM 262 Quantitative Analysis 3
      IBIO 341 Fundamental Genetics 4
      IBIO 408 Histology 4
      MMG 301 Introductory Microbiology 3
      MMG 409 Eukaryotic Cell Biology 3
      PHM 350 Introductory Human Pharmacology 3
      PSY 320 Health Psychology 3
      Global Nutrition and Health (42 to 47 credits):
      (1) All of the following courses (23 credits):
      CSUS 215 International Development and Sustainability 3
      HNF 377 Applied Community Nutrition 4
      HNF 406 Global Foods and Culture 3
      HNF 415 Global Nutrition 3
      HNF 453 Nutrition and Human Development 3
      PSL 310 Physiology for Pre-Health Professionals 4
      SOC 362 Developing Societies 3
      (2) One of the following, (a) or (b), (4 or 6 credits):
      (a) CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry 4
      (b) CEM 251 Organic Chemistry I 3
      CEM 252 Organic Chemistry II 3
      (3) One of the following courses (2 to 4 credits):
      AL 200 Cultural Difference and Study Abroad 3
      ANP 200 Navigating Another Culture 2
      ANP 370 Culture, Health, and Illness 3
      COM 391 Topics in Verbal, Intercultural, or Gender Communication 4
      GSAH 230 Values, Experience, and Difference in Global Contexts 3
      (4) One of the following courses (4 credits):
      BMB 200 Introduction to Biochemistry 4
      BMB 401 Comprehensive Biochemistry 4
      (5) One of the following courses (3 credits):
      CSUS 429 Program Evaluation for Community Sustainability 3
      CSUS 433 Grant Writing and Fund Development (W) 3
      (6) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
      STT 201 Statistical Methods 4
      STT 224 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Ecologists     3
      STT 231 Statistics for Scientists    3
      STT 464 Statistics for Biologists    3
      (7) One of the following courses (3 credits):
      ANP 270 Women and Health: Anthropological and International Perspectives 3
      CSS 431 International Agricultural Systems 3
      CSUS 463 Food Fight: Politics of Food  3
      EEP 260 World Food Population and Poverty 3
      FOR 466 Natural Resource Policy  3
      GEO 435 Geography of Health and Disease 3
      PHL 453 Ethical Issues in Global Public Health 3
      SOC 161 International Development and Change 3
      Public Health Nutrition (40 to 43 credits):
      (1) All of the following courses (23 credits):
      HM 101 Introduction to Public Health 3
      HNF 377 Applied Community Nutrition 4
      HNF 385 Public Health Nutrition 3
      HNF 485 Advanced Public Health Nutrition 3
      PSL 310 Physiology for Pre-Health Professionals 4
      STT 421 Statistics I 3
      STT 422 Statistics II 3
      (2) One of the following, either (a) or (b), (4 or 6 credits):
      (a) CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry 4
      (b) CEM 251 Organic Chemistry I 3
      CEM 252 Organic Chemistry II 3
      (3) One of the following courses (4 credits):
      BMB 200 Introduction to Biochemistry 4
      BMB 401 Comprehensive Biochemistry 4
      (4) One of the following courses (3 credits):
      CSUS 429 Program Evaluation for Community Sustainability 3
      CSUS 433 Grant Writing and Fund Development (W) 3
      (5) Two of the following courses (6 or 7 credits):
      ANP 270 Women and Health: Anthropological and International Perspectives 3
      ANP 370 Culture, Health, and Illness 3
      ANP 443 Human Adaptability 3
      EPI 240 Epidemiological Investigations in Nutrition and Health 4
      EPI 390 Disease in Society: Introduction to Epidemiology and Public Health 3
      GEO 435 Geography of Health and Disease 3
      HNF 453 Nutrition and Human Development 3
      PHL 453 Ethical Issues in Global Public Health 3
      PLS 313 American Public Policy 3
      SOC 451 Dynamics of Population  3
      SOC 475 Health and Society 3

Minor in Beverage Science and Technology

The Minor in Beverage Science and Technology is designed to provide students with fundamental knowledge of the production of fermented beverages. Certain courses in this minor are only offered at off-campus wineries or breweries. The minor is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs at Michigan State University. The minor is administered by the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition.

With the approval of the department and college that administer the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

Requirements for the Minor in Beverage Science and Technology

               
Students must complete 15 credits from the following:  
1. One of the following courses (3 credits):  
  FSC 342 Food Safety and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point Program 3
  MMG 201 Fundamentals of Microbiology 3
  MMG 301 Introductory Microbiology 3
2. One of the following courses (3 credits):  
  BE 350 Heat and Mass Transfer in Biosystems 3
  BE 429 Fundamentals of Food Engineering 3
  CHE 311 Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer 3
  FSC 325 Food Processing: Unit Operations 3
  ME 410 Heat Transfer 3
3. All of the following courses (9 credits):  
  CEM 482 Science and Technology of Wine Production 3
  CHE 483 Brewing and Distilled Beverage Technology 3
  FSC 481 Fermented Beverages 3

Minor in Food Processing and Technology

The Minor in Food Processing and Technology is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (other than the Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in food science), The School of Hospitality Business, the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics and to students who are enrolled in the Environmental Biology/Microbiology and Microbiology coordinate majors in Lyman Briggs College.  The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition administers the minor.

The primary educational objective of the minor is to provide students with basic knowledge of food processing.  The undergraduate coordinator for food science in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition is available to assist students in planning their programs of study for the minor.

With the approval of the college and department that administer the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

Requirements for the Minor in Food Processing and Technology

The student must complete:

               
1. One of the following courses (3 credits):  
  ANS 201 Animal Products 3
  FSC 211 Principles of Food Science 3
2. The following course (3 credits):  
  FSC 325 Food Processing: Unit Operations 3
3. Two of the following courses (5 or 6 credits):  
  FSC 342 Food Safety and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point Program 3
  FSC 420 Quality Assurance 2
  FSC 421 Food Laws and Regulations 3
4. Two of the following courses (6 credits):  
  CEM 482 Science and Technology of Wine Production 3
  CHE 483 Brewing and Distilled Beverage Technology 3
  FSC 430 Food Processing: Fruits and Vegetables 3
  FSC 431 Food Processing: Cereals 3
  FSC 432 Food Processing: Dairy Foods 3
  FSC 433 Food Processing: Muscle Foods 3
  FSC 481 Fermented Beverages 3