Academic Programs Catalog

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

Scott R. Winterstein, Chairperson


The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife strongly believes that our natural resources and environment are vital to our future, thus the faculty, staff and students strive to meet the global challenges that threaten the sustainability of our ecosystems. Our students and stakeholders are empowered with the knowledge needed to ensure our natural heritage and a high quality of life.  The department's mission is to provide the education, research, and outreach needed by society for the conservation and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife resources and their ecosystems.  For more information visit www.fw.msu.edu.
 

Undergraduate Programs


Fisheries and Wildlife

Fisheries and wildlife management involves the maintenance and management of wild populations of fish and wildlife species and the ecosystems in which they live.  Wild populations cannot be managed without an understanding of how human, social, economic, political and behavioral considerations interact in the natural world.  As a fisheries and wildlife major at Michigan State University, students will acquire basic knowledge in the application of these interactions between and among the natural and social sciences. 

Majors in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife prepare for rewarding careers as fisheries and wildlife technicians, biologists, managers, naturalists, and applied ecologists.  Others may choose to pursue related careers as conservation officers, environmental consultants or natural resource administrators.  Employment is generally found with state and federal natural resource agencies such as the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Park Service.  There are also excellent job opportunities with private companies such as International Paper and non-profit organizations such as The Nature Conservancy or Trout Unlimited as well at many universities and colleges.

The undergraduate program in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University is nationally and internationally recognized.  The program provides a strong base in the foundational and applied sciences of natural resource management. The program is designed to develop understanding of the cultural, recreational, and economic values of biological resources. The department offers a core of required courses including biology and physical sciences, math and statistics, communications, ethics and philosophy, and experiential learning in addition to a large selection of other fisheries and wildlife courses.  The fisheries and wildlife undergraduate program also allows students to develop their individual interests through completion of one of six concentrations that are designed to provide additional breadth and depth, including: conservation biology, fisheries biology and management, wildlife biology and management, water sciences, fish and wildlife disease ecology and management, and preveterinary.

Conservation Biology focuses on the science of analyzing and protecting the earth’s biological diversity drawing from the biological, physical and social sciences, economics, and the practice of natural resource management.

Fisheries Biology and Management is designed for students interested in the research and management of fish, other freshwater and marine organisms, and the ecosystems that sustain them.

Wildlife Biology and Management is for students interested in understanding and managing terrestrial habitats and animals including game, non-game, and endangered species.

Water Sciences is designed for students interested in examining the biological, physical, chemical, geological and hydrological aspects of lakes and ponds, rivers and streams, wetlands and groundwaters including water quality. This concentration provides students with an understanding for protecting and restoring water resources around the Great Lakes and the world.

Fish and Wildlife Disease Ecology and Management is designed to provide students with an improved understanding of the emergence and spread of infectious diseases and the likely consequences that increased contact between fish and wildlife, and domestic animal and human populations have on these environmental problems.

Preveterinary is designed for students who are interested in careers in veterinary medicine and satisfies the course requirements for admission to Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Dual advising at the College of Veterinary Medicine is required.

Students who complete the requirements for the fisheries and wildlife major and choose elective courses appropriately can also satisfy requirements for certification by: the American Fisheries Society as an Associate Fisheries Scientist;  the Wildlife Society as an Associate Wildlife Biologist; the Society of Wetland Scientists as a Wetland Professional-in-training.

Students who are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science degree in Fisheries and Wildlife may elect to minor in any number of related relevant subject areas. For additional information available on minors, visit http://www.reg.msu.edu/AcademicPrograms/Programs.aspx?PType=MNUN.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Fisheries and Wildlife

  1. The University requirements for bachelor's degrees as described in the Undergraduate Education section of this catalog; 120 credits, including general elective credits, are required for the Bachelor of Science degree in Fisheries and Wildlife.

    The University’s Tier II writing requirement for the Fisheries and Wildlife major is met by completing Fisheries and Wildlife 434 referenced in item 3. below.

    Students who are enrolled in the Fisheries and Wildlife major leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife may complete an alternative track to Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences by completing items 3. a. and 3. b. below. The completion of Biological Sciences 171 or 172 or Lyman Briggs 144 and Chemistry 161 or Lyman Briggs 171L satisfies the laboratory requirement. Completion of items 3. a. and 3. b. below will be counted toward both the alternative track and the requirements for the major.

    The completion of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources mathematics requirement may also satisfy the University mathematics requirement.
  2. The requirements of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources for the Bachelor of Science degree.

    Certain courses referenced in requirement 3. below may be counted toward College requirements as appropriate.  The completion of item 3. d. below satisfies the College's mathematics requirement.
  3. The following requirements for the major:
                   
    a. One of the following groups of courses (9 or 10 credits):   
      (1) BS  161 Cell and Molecular Biology 3
        BS 171 Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory 2
        BS 162 Organismal and Population Biology 3
        BS 172 Organismal and Population Biology Laboratory 2
      (2) BS  161 Cell and Molecular Biology 3
        BS 171 Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory 2
        LB 144 Biology I - Organismal Biology 4
      (3) LB  144 Biology I – Organismal Biology 4
        LB  145 Biology II: Cellular and Molecular Biology  5
        Students pursuing the Preveterinary concentration must complete either group (2) or group (3).  
    b. One of the following groups of courses (5 credits):  
      (1) CEM  141 General Chemistry 4
        CEM  161 Chemistry Laboratory I 1
      (2) CEM  151 General and Descriptive Chemistry 4
        CEM  161 Chemistry Laboratory I 1
      (3) LB  171 Principles of Chemistry I 4
        LB  171L  Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I 1
    c. One course from each group (6 to 8 credits):   
      (1) PHY  231 Introductory Physics I 3
        PHY  183 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I 4
        LB  273 Physics I 4
      (2) CSS  210 Fundamentals of Soil Science 3
        GLG 201 The Dynamic Earth 4
        GEO  203 Introduction to Meteorology 3
        GEO 206 Physical Geography 3
        ENT  319 Introduction to Earth System Science 3
    d. One course from each group (6 or 7 credits):   
      (1) MTH  124 Survey of Calculus I 3
        MTH  132 Calculus I 3
        LB  118 Calculus I 4
      (2) STT  231 Statistics for Scientists 3
        STT  224 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Ecologists 3
        STT  421 Statistics I  3
    e. Two of the following courses (6 credits):   
      COM 100 Human Communication 3
      COM 225 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3
      COM 275 Effects of Mass Communication 3
      CSUS 325 Study and Practice of Communication for Sustainability (W) 3
      CSUS 433 Grant Writing and Fund Development (W) 3
      FW  435 Integrated Communications for the Fisheries and Wildlife Professional 3
      JRN 472 Laboratory in Environmental Reporting 3
      WRA 320 Technical Writing (W) 3
      WRA  331 Writing in the Public Interest (W) 3
      WRA 341 Nature, Environmental, and Travel Writing 3
      WRA  453 Grant and Proposal Writing 3
    f. One of the following courses (3 credits):   
      FW  438 Philosophy of Ecology (W) 3
      FW 439 Conservation Ethics 3
      PHL  340 Ethics     3
      PHL 342 Environmental Ethics 3
      PHL  380 Nature of Science 3
      PHL   484 Philosophy of Biological Science 3
      GEO  432 Environmental Ethics (W) 3
    g. One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):   
      FW  493 Professional Internship in Fisheries and Wildlife 3
      FW  490 Independent Study in Fisheries and Wildlife 3
      FW  480 International Studies in Fisheries and Wildlife 3
      FW  499 Senior Thesis in Fisheries and Wildlife 4
    h. All of the following courses (17 credits):   
      FW  101 Fundamentals of Fisheries and Wildlife Ecology and Management 3
      FW  293 Undergraduate Seminar in Fisheries and Wildlife 1
      FW  364 Ecological Problem Solving 3
      FW  424 Population Analysis and Management 4
      FW  434 Human Dimension of Fisheries and Wildlife Management (W) 3
      ZOL  355 Ecology     3
    i. One of the following courses (2 or 3 credits):  
      FW 101L Fundamentals of Fisheries and Wildlife Ecology and Management Laboratory 2
      FW 238 Introductory Fisheries and Wildlife Field Experience 3
    j. One of the following concentrations:   
      Conservation Biology (27 to 29 credits):  
      (1) All of the following courses (12 credits):  
        FW  444 Conservation Biology 3
        FW 445 Biodiversity Conservation Policy and Practice 3
        FW  443 Restoration Ecology 3
        ZOL  445 Evolution (W) 3
      (2) One of the following courses (3 credits):  
        FOR 404 Forest Ecology 3
        PLB  441 Plant Ecology 3
        ZOL 485 Tropical Biology  3
      (3) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        CSS  350 Introduction to Plant Genetics 3
        ZOL  341 Fundamental Genetics 4
      (4) One of the following courses (3 credits):  
        FW  410 Upland Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  414 Aquatic Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  416 Marine Ecosystem Management  3
        FW  417 Wetland Ecology and Management 3
        FW 454 Environmental Hydrology for Watershed Management 3
        FW  479 Fisheries Management 3
      (5) One of the following courses (3 credits):  
        CSUS 464 Environmental and Natural Resource Policy in Michigan

    3

        CSUS 465 Environmental Law and Policy 3
        EEP  255 Ecological Economics 3
        FW  481 Global Issues in Fisheries and Wildlife 3
        FOR  466 Natural Resource Policy 3
        MC 450 International Environmental Law and Policy 3
        ZOL  446 Environmental Issues and Public Policy 3
      (6) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        ENT  422 Aquatic Entomology  3
        FOR  204 Forest Vegetation 3
        FW  471 Ichthyology 4
        PLB  218 Plants of Michigan 3
        PLB  418 Plant Systematics 3
        ZOL  360 Biology of Birds  4
        ZOL  365 Biology of Mammals 4
        ZOL  384 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles (W) 4
      Fisheries Biology and Management (25 to 28 credits):  
      (1) One of the following courses (3 credits):   
        FW  472 Limnology  3
        FW  420 Stream Ecology 3
      (2) All of the following courses (10 credits):  
        FW  471 Ichthyology 4
        FW  479 Fisheries Management  3
        FW  474 Field and Laboratory Techniques for Aquatic Studies  3
      (3) One of the following courses (3 credits):  
        FW  414 Aquatic Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  416 Marine Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  417 Wetland Ecology and Management 3
        FW 454 Environmental Hydrology for Watershed Management 3
      (4) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        ENT 404 Fundamentals of Entomology 3
        ENT  422 Aquatic Entomology 3
        ZOL  306 Invertebrate Biology 4
      (5) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        PLB  418 Plant Systematics 3
        PLB 424 Algal Biology 4
      (6) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        CSS 350 Introduction to Plant Genetics 3
        FW 431 Ecophysiology and Toxicology of Fishes 3
        ZOL  328 Comparative Anatomy and Biology of Vertebrates (W) 4
        ZOL  341 Fundamental Genetics 4
        ZOL  483 Environmental Physiology (W) 4
      Wildlife Biology and Management (26 or 27 credits):  
      (1) All of the following courses (9 credits):  
        FW  410 Upland Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  417 Wetland Ecology and Management 3
        FW 413 Wildlife Research and Management Techniques 3
      (2) Two of the following courses (8 credits):  
        ZOL  360 Biology of Birds  4
        ZOL  365 Biology of Mammals 4
        ZOL  384 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles (W) 4
      (3) One of the following courses (3 credits):  
        FOR  204 Forest Vegetation 3
        PLB  218 Plants of Michigan 3
        PLB  418 Plant Systematics 3
      (4) One of the following courses (3 credits):  
        FOR 404 Forest Ecology 3
        PLB 105 Plant Biology 3
        PLB 203 Biology of Plants 3
        PLB 335 Plants Through Time 3
        PLB 441 Plant Ecology 3
      (5) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        CSS 350 Introduction to Plant Genetics 3
        ZOL  328 Comparative Anatomy and Biology of Vertebrates (W) 4
        ZOL  341 Fundamental Genetics 4
        ZOL  483 Environmental Physiology (W) 4
      Water Sciences (24 to 28 credits):  
      (1) Two of the following courses (6 credits):  
        FW  417 Wetland Ecology and Management 3
        FW  420 Stream Ecology 3
        FW  472 Limnology 3
      (2) The following course (3 credits):   
        FW  474 Field and Laboratory Techniques for Aquatic Studies  3
      (3) One of the following courses (3 credits):  
        FW  414 Aquatic Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  416 Marine Ecosystem Management 3
        FW 454 Environmental Hydrology for Watershed Management 3
        FW  479 Fisheries Management 3
      (4) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        ENT 404 Fundamentals of Entomology 3
        ENT  422 Aquatic Entomology 3
        FW  471 Ichthyology 4
        ZOL  306 Invertebrate Biology 4
      (5) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        PLB  418 Plant Systematics 3
        PLB  424 Algal Biology 4
      (6) Two of the following courses (6 to 8 credits):  
        CSS 350 Introduction to Plant Genetics 3
        FW 431 Ecophysiology and Toxicology of Fishes 3
        GLG  421 Environmental Geochemistry 4
        MMG  425 Microbial Ecology 3
        ZOL  303 Oceanography 4
        ZOL  341 Fundamental Genetics 4
        ZOL  353 Marine Biology (W) 4
        ZOL  483 Environmental Physiology (W) 4
      Fish and Wildlife Disease Ecology and Management (33 to 35 credits):  
      (1) All of the following courses (24 credits):  
        EPI  390 Disease in Society: Introduction to Epidemiology and Public Health 4
        FW  423 Principles of Fish and Wildlife Disease  3
        FW 423L  Principles of Fish and Wildlife Disease Laboratory  1
        FW  444 Conservation Biology 3
        FW 463 Wildlife Disease Ecology 3
        MMG  301 Introductory Microbiology 3
        ZOL 341 Fundamental Genetics 4
        ZOL  445 Evolution (W) 3
      (2) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry 4
        CEM 251 Organic Chemistry 3
      (3) One of the following courses (3 credits):  
        FW  410 Upland Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  414 Aquatic Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  416 Marine Ecosystem Management 3
        FW  417 Wetland Ecology and Management 3
        FW 454 Environmental Hydrology for Watershed Management 3
        FW  479 Fisheries Management 3
      (4) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        FW 471 Ichthyology 4
        ZOL  306 Invertebrate Biology 4
        ZOL  316 General Parasitology 3
        ZOL  360 Biology of Birds  4
        ZOL  365 Biology of Mammals 4
        ZOL  384 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles (W) 4
      Preveterinary (38 or 39 credits):
     
      (1) All of the following courses (31 credits):  
        BMB  401 Basic Biochemistry  4
        CEM  251 Organic Chemistry I 3
        CEM  252 Organic Chemistry II  3
        CEM  255 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2
        FW  423 Principles of Fish and Wildlife Disease  3
        FW  423L  Principles of Fish and Wildlife Disease Laboratory  1
        FW 463 Wildlife Disease Ecology 3
        MMG  301 Introductory Microbiology 3
        MMG  302 Introductory Laboratory for General and Allied Health Microbiology 1
        MMG  409 Eukaryotic Cell Biology  3
        PHY  251 Introductory Physics Laboratory I 1
        PHY  232 Introductory Physics II  3
        PHY 252 Introductory Physics Laboratory II  1
      (2) One of the following courses (4 credits):  
        ANS  314 Genetic Improvement of Domestic Animals 4
        ZOL  341 Fundamental Genetics 4
      (3) One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):  
        ANS 313 Principles of Animal Feeding and Nutrition 4
        HNF 150 Introduction to Human Nutrition 3
        HNF 260 Principles of Human Nutrition 3

Minor in Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement

The Minor in Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement is designed to combine the natural resource expertise of the fisheries and wildlife, forestry, parks, recreation and tourism, and environmental sustainability programs, with the law enforcement expertise of the criminal justice program to serve those students with career interests in conservation, recreation or environmental law enforcement. The minor is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs in criminal justice, fisheries and wildlife, forestry, parks, recreation and tourism and environmental studies and sustainability. The minor is administered by the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Students who are interested in enrolling should apply to the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife for acceptance.

With the approval of the department and college that administer the student’s degree program, courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

Requirements for the Minor in Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement

The student must complete (19 to 20 credits):

1. Complete both of the following courses (4 credits):
CJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CSUS 278 Introduction to Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement 1
Natural Resources Conservation and Management (6 or 7 credits)
1. One of the following courses (3 credits):
CSUS 200 Introduction to Sustainability 3
CSUS 276 Sustaining our National Parks and Recreation Lands 3
FOR 202 Introduction to Forestry 3
FW 101 Fundamentals of Fisheries and Wildlife 3
2. One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
CSUS 320 Environmental Planning and Management 3
CSUS 476 Natural Resource Recreation Management 4
FW 444 Conservation Biology 3
FW 481 Global Issues in Fisheries and Wildlife 3
Environmental Attitudes, Policy and Law (3 credits)
1. One of the following courses (3 or 4 credits):
CSUS 310 History of Environmental Thought and Sustainability 3
CSUS 464 Environmental and Natural Resource Policy in Michigan 3
CSUS 465 Environmental and Natural Resource Law 3
FOR 330 Human Dimensions of Forests 3
FOR 466 Natural Resource Policy 3
FW 434 Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management 3
FW 445 Biodiversity Conservation Policy and Practice 3
MC 450 International Environmental Law and Policy 3
SOC 452 Environment and Society 3
ZOL 446 Environmental Issues and Public Policy 3
Law Enforcement (6 credits)
1. Two of the following courses (6 credits):
CJ 210 Introduction to Forensic Science 3
CJ 220 Criminology 3
CJ 235 Investigation Procedures 3
CJ 275 Criminal Procedure 3
CJ 335 Policing 3
CJ 432 Community Policing 3


Minor in Marine Ecosystem Management

The Minor in Marine Ecosystem Management is designed to provide students with a fundamental background in ecosystem management of marine natural resources. Students gain insight and experience in marine management issues relative to estuarine, coastal, and open-water marine ecosystems from the perspective of habitat, biota and human resource users. Students are also exposed to the management skills necessary to recognize and use effective techniques to conserve, preserve and restore marine ecosystem integrity for the benefit of society. This unique management emphasis serves the career interests of students well as they pursue positions in the marine sciences.

The Minor in Marine Ecosystem Management is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in Bachelor of Science degree programs with majors in Fisheries and Wildlife, and Zoology. The minor is administered by the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. With the approval of the department and college that administer the student’s degree program, courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

Students who plan to complete the requirements for the marine ecosystem management minor should contact the undergraduate advisor for fisheries and wildlife in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Requirements for the Minor in Marine Ecosystem Management

The student must complete:

               
Marine Ecosystem Management  
All of the following courses (14 credits):  
FW 110 Conservation and Management of Marine Resources 3
FW 416 Marine Ecosystem Management 3
ZOL 303 Oceanography     4
ZOL 353 Marine Biology (W)     4
Biodiversity            
One of the following courses (4 credits):  
FW 471 Ichthyology       4
PLB 424 Algal Biology     4
ZOL 306 Invertebrate Biology 4
Experiential Learning in Marine Ecosystem Management  
One of the following courses which must contain a marine emphasis (2 to 4 credits):  
FW 480 International Studies in Fisheries and Wildlife 3
FW 493 Professional Internships in Fisheries and Wildlife 2 or 3
ZOL 496 Internship in Zoology 4
ZOL 498 Internship in Zoo and Aquarium Science 4

 


Graduate Study

The graduate program in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University is nationally and internationally recognized as a leader in research and teaching.  Our faculty are  among the top professionals in their fields, and our programs are at the forefront of teaching management policy, conservation biology, human dimensions of natural resources management, as well as fish and wildlife biology, ecology, and management.

Scientists from throughout the world regularly visit the department, interacting with the faculty and students, and presenting seminars.  Graduate students are encouraged to attend regional, national, and international professional meetings such as the annual Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference, the American Fisheries Society Conference, the Wildlife Society Conference, the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference, the Society for Conservation Biology Conference, Ecological Society of American Conference, and the International Association of Landscape Ecology Conference in addition to local professional meetings such as the Michigan Chapters of the American Fisheries Society and The Wildlife Society.

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife brings together a diverse group of related basic and applied sciences.  Faculty and graduate students are actively engaged in teaching, research, and outreach.  Major areas of interest include: wildlife ecology and management; fisheries science and management; limnology (including water quality and water pollution biology); conservation biology; environmental management; aquaculture; human dimensions of resource management; wetland ecology and management; stream ecology; wildlife disease ecology and conservation medicine; and ecosystem and population modeling.

In addition to the major areas of interest, fisheries and wildlife graduate students can develop their own program of study under the direction of major professors and guidance committees within the department.  For students who wish to pursue programs in the social, economic, geographic, or education-related aspects of fisheries and wildlife management, interdisciplinary programs are offered.  Interaction with many related departments and colleges at Michigan State University, as well as with state and federal agencies, allow for both depth and breadth in research and academic programs.

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife offers Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in fisheries and wildlife, a Doctor of Philosophy degree program in fisheries and wildlife—environmental toxicology, and a Graduate Certificate in Conservation Law.

Students in the Master of Science degree program in fisheries and wildlife are eligible for the dual JD program with Michigan State University - College of Law.

Students who are enrolled in Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife may elect specializations in environmental and resource economics,  fish and wildlife disease ecology and conservation medicine, and gender, justice and environmental change. For additional information, refer to the statements on Interdepartmental Graduate Specializations in Environmental and Resource Economics, Graduate Specialization in Fish and Wildlife Disease Ecology and Conservation Medicine, and the Graduate Specialization in Gender, Justice, and Environmental Change in this catalog.

 


Fisheries and Wildlife - Master of Science

Programs of study are based on the academic preparation, interests, and career goals of individual students.  Although individual students' programs vary, all graduate programs in fisheries and wildlife are designed to provide:

  1. Broad fundamental preparation in the ecological sciences.
  2. Preparation in one of the areas of specialization within the field of fisheries and wildlife.
  3. A foundation for careers in administration, research, management, teaching, or extension.

The department offers the following areas of specialization within the field of fisheries and wildlife:  conservation biology, restoration ecology, human dimensions, fisheries ecology and management, wildlife ecology and management, population dynamics and modeling, limnology, aquaculture, environmental management, environmental education, and environmental toxicology.

In cooperation with other colleges and departments, graduate students in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife may be involved in research in the nutrition, pathology, and physiology of fish and wildlife.

Master of Science

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the student must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

Admission to a master's program requires prior completion of an undergraduate major in a biological or other appropriate science with course work appropriate to support the graduate program. Students lacking sufficient courses may be admitted provisionally until such deficiencies are removed by completing collateral courses. Scores on the Graduate Record Examination General Test are required. The Subject Test in Biology is recommended.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Fisheries and Wildlife

The student may elect either Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (without thesis). A total of 30 credits is required for the degree under either Plan A or Plan B. The student and the major professor plan a program of study that includes courses related to one of the areas of specialization within the field of fisheries and wildlife referenced above and three credits of Fisheries and Wildlife 893. The program must be approved by the student's guidance committee.

 


Fisheries and Wildlife - Doctor of Philosophy

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the student must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

Applicants for a doctoral program should have completed a Bachelor of Science degree and a Master of Science degree in a biological or other appropriate science. Additional background in mathematics, chemistry, botany, and zoology is desirable. Scores on the Graduate Record Examination General Test are required. The Subject Test in Biology is recommended.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Fisheries and Wildlife

The student and the major professor plan a program of study that includes courses related to one of the areas of specialization within the field of fisheries and wildlife referenced above and three credits of Fisheries and Wildlife 893. The program must be approved by the student's guidance committee.



Fisheries and Wildlife - Environmental Toxicology

Doctor of Philosophy

For information about the Doctor of Philosophy degree program in fisheries and wildlife—environmental toxicology, refer to the statement on Doctoral Program in Environmental and Integrative Toxicological Sciences in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.

 


Conservation Law - Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Conservation Law provides students an opportunity to explore conservation law by gaining familiarity with the language, theory and practices of the law discipline to better integrate their core education with their respective environmental or conservation-related disciplinary field.

The graduate certificate is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in master’s or doctoral degree programs at Michigan State University.


Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Conservation Law

               
Students must complete both of the following courses (9 credits):  
LAW 630M Conservation Law Clinic I 6
LAW 630N Conservation Law Clinic II 3