Academic Programs Catalog

College of Education

Graduate Study

Graduate study in the Department of Teacher Education leads to the Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy degree. Graduate Specializations are also available in Language and Literacy Education for doctoral students, Literacy and Language Instruction for master's students, and in K-12 English as a Second Language for master's students. Graduate certificates at the doctoral level are also available in Science Education, Urban Education, English Language Learner Education, and Qualitative Research Methods.
 


Teaching and Curriculum - Master of Arts

The master’s program in teaching and curriculum is designed principally for persons who wish to acquire advanced professional knowledge related to teaching and curriculum diverse learners in K–12 schools. The program is offered in face-to-face, online, and hybrid formats.

This master’s program in teaching and curriculum consists of (1) designated areas of integrated, practice-centered inquiry in professional, disciplinary, and foundational studies and (2) sustained, simultaneous inquiry in both university and public–school settings. The program is designed for certified teachers and other educators who wish to continue their professional studies in teaching and curriculum.

Students wishing to add an Arabic or an English as a Second Language endorsement, a Classroom Reading Teacher (BT) endorsement, or Reading Specialist certification (BR) to their Michigan teaching certificate, as part of their Master of Arts in Teaching and Curriculum program may do so by completing the specified requirements for this endorsement or certification that have been approved by the Michigan Department of Education.

The program also considers applications from students who wish to pursue Michigan teacher certification in tandem with earning the master’s degree in curriculum and teaching.  Such students need to apply to and be accepted into the Teacher Certification Program, through which they will meet current Michigan teacher certification requirements in a program of study and in a year-long internship that will be tailored to their teaching aspirations and their previous academic background.  [For additional information on the requirements for teacher certification and for admission into Michigan State University’s Teacher Certification Program, see the TEACHER CERTIFICATION section of this catalog.]

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Education, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

Applications for admission to the master's program are reviewed by faculty who look for evidence of appropriate preparation for advanced disciplinary and professional study at the master's level and the likelihood of academic success, as indicated by an applicant's prior educational record, work experience, statement of professional goals, letters of recommendation, and an assigned professional essay.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree in Teaching and Curriculum

The program is available only under Plan B (without thesis).  Students must complete 30 credits distributed as follows:

               
1. Professional Development and Inquiry Core (9 credits):  
  a. One of the following courses:  
    TE 807 Professional Development and Inquiry 3
    TE 808 Inquiry into Classroom Teaching and Learning 3
  b. One of the following courses:  
    TE 801 Professional Roles and Teaching Practice I 3
    TE 818 Curriculum in Its Social Context 3
    Students who have completed Teacher Education 801 in the College's Internship Year Studies program may use it to fulfill this requirement.
  c. One of the following capstone courses:  
    TE 870 Curriculum Design, Development, and Deliberation in Schools 3
    TE 872 Teachers as Teacher Educators 3
    TE 873 Literacy Leadership 3
2. Concentration (9 credits):  
  Complete 9 credits in course work selected from one of the following:  
  a. Three 3-credit courses at the 400-level or above from a list of approved courses available in the department.  
  b. Three 3-credit courses at the 400-level or above from one of the areas of concentration on an approved list available in the department.  
3. Electives (12 credits):  
  a. Three 3-credit Teacher Education courses at the 400-level or above from a list of approved courses available in the department. Students who have completed Teacher Education 802 and 804 in the College's Internship Year Studies program may use those courses to fulfill this requirement.  
  b. Three additional credits of electives as approved by the student's academic advisor.  
4. A synthesis paper acceptable to the student's examining committee.  This paper must be submitted near the end of the student's program of study. The submission of an acceptable synthesis paper and professional portfolio satisfies the University requirement of a final examination or evaluation.  
5. A professional portfolio developed by the student throughout the master’s program, beginning in Teacher Education 807 or 808. The portfolio is reviewed by two faculty members. A third reviewer is required if the first two reviewers do not reach consensus regarding the acceptability of the portfolio. The submission of an acceptable portfolio satisfies the University’s requirement of a final examination or evaluation.  



Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education - Doctor of Philosophy

The doctoral program in curriculum, teaching, and educational policy is designed for persons who are interested in and show promise of becoming scholars and leaders in the domains of curriculum, instruction, and teacher education, and educational policy at the K–12 or college level, or in local, state, regional, national, or international institutions or agencies. The program is characterized by its interdisciplinary and interinstitutional perspectives on problems and issues of educational practice.

Doctoral students in curriculum, instruction, and teacher education link their areas of concentration with one or more of the following emphasis areas:

  1. Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning.
    Faculty and doctoral students who are associated with this emphasis area are interested in the interactive relationships among curriculum; the teaching and learning of school subjects; and the ideological, social, and disciplinary contexts of teaching and learning within and across subject areas.  The curriculum, teaching, and learning emphasis area supports concentration in language education, literacy, mathematics, science, and social studies. Among the areas of central inquiry are curriculum theories, history, design, and development; relationships between disciplines and school subjects; and debates about what knowledge is of most worth, for whom, and for what purposes.
  2. Educational Policy and Social Analysis.
    Faculty and doctoral students who are associated with this emphasis area share an interest in the critical analysis of educational policy.  The  courses that are related to the educational policy and social analysis emphasis area focus on a wide range of issues, including the social–historical contexts within which particular educational policies arise, the process by which educational policies are formulated, and the effects that educational policies produce.  In analyzing these issues, faculty and students draw on a wide range of perspectives from the social sciences.
  3. Teacher Education and Teacher Learning.
    Faculty and doctoral students who are associated with this emphasis area are concerned with the relationship between teacher education and teacher learning at the preservice, induction, and inservice levels.  The courses that are related to the teacher education and teacher learning emphasis area focus on the enterprise of teacher education, the practices of teacher educators, and the formal and informal learning of prospective, beginning, and experienced teachers over time and in different settings.

Students who are enrolled in the Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education in the Department of Teacher Education may elect a specialization in language and literacy. For additional information, refer to the statement on Graduate Specialization in Language and Literacy below.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Education, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

Persons who hold degrees in a wide range of disciplines may apply for admission to the doctoral program. Applicants with limited backgrounds in education, however, may be required to complete collateral work in this field. Applicants must submit a sample of scholarly writing.

Review of applicants focuses on their study and experience in education, on the compatibility between their professional goals and the doctoral program, and on their potential for successful advanced degree work.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education

Students must complete the following courses:

1. Core Proseminar sequence.  Both of the following courses:
TE 901 Proseminar in Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education I 3
TE 902 Proseminar in Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education II 3
2. Research Requirement - Educational inquiry and research.
a. The following course:
CEP 930 Educational Inquiry 3
b. One of the following courses in quantitative methodology:
CEP  932 Quantitative Methods in Educational Research I 3
TE 934 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Educational Research 3
c. One of the following courses in conceptual or qualitative methodology:
TE 931 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research 3
TE 939A Special Topics in Advanced Qualitative Methodology 3
TE 939B Advanced Qualitative Methods: Critical Ethnography 3
TE 939C Advanced Qualitative Methods: Discourse Analysis 3
TE 939D Advanced Qualitative Methods: Case Studies 3
TE 939E Advanced Qualitative Methods: Humanities Oriented Research 3
TE 939F Advanced Qualitative Methods: Phenomenology 3
TE 939G Advanced Qualitative Methods: Humanizing Research-Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry 3
A course used to fulfill this requirement may not be used to fulfill another requirement.
d. One 3 or 4 credit course in advanced methodology approved in advance by the guidance committee.
e. A research practicum to be taken after the student has completed the courses referenced in items 2.a., 2.b., or 2.c. above:
TE 995 Research Practicum in Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education 1 to 3
3. Core studies in education.
Three courses from a list of approved courses that are designed to provide broad and diverse perspectives on education. The approved list is available from the Department of Teacher Education.
4. Area of concentration.
At least five additional courses in the student's area of concentration.  Both the area and the related courses must be approved by the student's guidance committee.
5. Successful completion and defense of the dissertation. Students may not earn more than 30 credits in TE 999 Doctoral Dissertation Research.


English Language Learner Education - Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in English Language Learner Education is designed for students in doctoral programs who wish to gain a comprehensive understanding of the multiple complexities in educating English Language Learners (ELL) including the influence of the socio-historical, local, and policy contexts and the challenges of teaching learners with diverse levels of English proficiency and prior formal schooling experiences in both English as a second language and content-area classrooms. The graduate certificate provides an overview of the different sociocultural, socio-historical, and sociopolitical factors that influence ELL education; demonstrates different theories, methods, and program models in English as a second language teaching, bilingual education, and content-area teaching; stresses the importance of affirming the linguistic and cultural diversity of ELL’s; and offers the knowledge-base and skills in ELL education that students can apply in their own research and teaching in the field of education.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Graduate Certificate in English Language Learner Education students must be pursuing a doctoral degree program within the College of Education.

Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in English Language Learner Education

Students must complete 12 credits from the following:

                       
1.     Four of the following courses (12 credits):    
      EAD 907 Educational Policy for Immigrant and ELL Students 3
      LLT 808 Assessment for Language Teaching and Research 3
      LLT 860 Second Language Acquisition   3
      SOC 852 Migration and Social Change   3
      TE 904 ELL/ESL Research and Practice: K-12 3
      TE 908 Sociohistorical Perspectives on English Language Learners and Second Language Education in the U.S. 3
      TE 909 English Language Learners in Content Areas: Constructing Research Communities and Resources 3
      Students who wish to take an alternative course (3 or 4 credits) on English Language Learners in substitution of a course above must request formal permission from the graduate certificate program faculty. Only one substitution request will be accepted.  
2.     An English Language Learners Education research project focusing on issues related to teaching and learning, curriculum, policy, counseling, or leadership as they pertain to understanding problems, issues, and potential solutions in ELL education. This requirement can be met through a student’s doctoral research practicum requirement or through an independent study project arrangement with a faculty member. The project’s topic must be preapproved by the certificate program faculty. The project must result in a paper with a minimum length of 25 pages with references.  


Qualitative Research Methods - Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Research Methods is designed for doctoral students enrolled in College of Education doctoral programs. It focuses on enhancing doctoral students’ theoretical and practical preparation and expertise in conceiving, designing, conducting, analyzing, and reporting qualitative research studies as well as preparing them to teach both introductory and advanced courses in qualitative research methods when assuming faculty positions elsewhere.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Research Methods students must be pursuing a doctoral degree program within the College of Education.

Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Research Methods

Students must complete 15 credits from the following:

                       
1.     Both of the following courses (6 credits):      
      CEP 930 Educational Inquiry       3
      TE 931 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research 3
2.     At least three of the following courses (9 credits):  
      HST 803 Seminar in Methodology of Historical Research 3
      SOC 985 Qualitative Field Research     3
      TE 938 Qualitative Data Analysis     3
      TE 939A Special Topics in Advanced Qualitative Methods 3
      TE 939B Advanced Qualitative Methods: Critical Ethnography 3
      TE 939C Advanced Qualitative Methods: Discourse Analysis 3
      TE 939D Advanced Qualitative Methods: Case Studies 3
      TE 939E Advanced Qualitative Methods: Humanities Oriented Research 3
      TE 939F Advanced Qualitative Methods: Phenomenology 3
      TE 939G Advanced Qualitative Methods: Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry 3
      WRA 870 Research Methodologies in Rhetoric and Composition 3

Science Education - Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Science Education, which is administered by the Department of Teacher Education in the College of Education, is designed for doctoral students who are interested in developing expertise in science education across and within a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives. Cognition, sociocultural, and feminist-critical perspectives along with both qualitative and quantitative methodologies are studied.

Persons who hold degrees in a wide range of disciplines may apply for admission to the certificate program. Applicants without sufficient science or science education background will be required to complete collateral course work or demonstrate proficiency through other means. Collateral course work will not count towards the certificate program. Review of applicants focuses on their study and experience in science and education, on the compatibility between their professional goals and the certificate program, and the potential for successful advanced degree work.

With approval of the College of Education, the certificate is available as an elective to any qualified student who is enrolled in a Doctor of Philosophy degree program in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, College of Natural Science, or the College of Education. Students must meet the requirements of the certificate specified below, in addition to the requirements for the student’s Doctor of Philosophy degree program.

Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Science Education

               
1. Both of the following courses (9 credits):  
  TE 936 Topics in Research on Teaching and Learning Science 6
  TE 937 Topics in Social, Historical, Philosophical Foundations of Science Education 3
  Students will enroll in two 3-credit enrollments for Teacher Education 936.  
2. Students must complete a project under the supervision of a Teacher  Education science education faculty member. College of Education students may fulfill the project requirement through a science education-focused research practicum by enrolling in Teacher Education 995 for 1 to 3 credits. Students outside the College of  Education can meet this requirement by enrolling in a 1-credit section of Teacher Education 990 Independent Study experience with a Teacher Education faculty member.  


Graduate Specialization in K-12 English as a Second Language

The Graduate Specialization in K-12 English as a Second Language, which is administered by the Department of Teacher Education in the College of Education, is designed for students who aspire to become endorsed to teach English as a Second Language at the elementary and/or secondary level in a K-12 setting.

The graduate specialization is available to master’s students who are enrolled in the Master of Arts degree in Teaching and Curriculum, the Master of Arts degree in Education, and the Master of Arts degree in Special Education at Michigan State University. With the approval of the department and college that administers the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the graduate specialization may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the master’s degree.  The planned program of courses meets the content knowledge requirements set for by the Michigan Department of Education for the K-12 Endorsement in English as a Second Language (NS).

Requirements for the Graduate Specialization in K-12 English as a Second Language

Students must complete 23 credits from the following:

1. All of the following courses (8 credits):
LLT 846 English Structures and Functions 3
TE 892 ESL/FL Classroom Practices: K-12 Literacy Instruction 3
TE 896 ESL/FL Practicum: K-12 2
2. One of the following courses (3 credits):
TE 845 Language Diversity and Literacy Instruction and Assessment 3
TE 846 Accommodating Differences in Literacy Learners 3
3. One of the following courses (3 credits):
Elementary Certified Students
TE 843 Secondary Reading Assessment and Instruction 3
Secondary Certified Students
TE 842 Elementary Assessment and Instruction 3
Michigan Department of Education (MDE) requires whenever  teachers add a K-12 endorsement, they must have reading course work for both levels of certification - elementary and secondary.  It is assumed, to be in compliance with MDE standards for initial certification, that an elementary certified teacher has already had course work related to elementary reading and, likewise, secondary certified teachers have already had a course in cross-content secondary reading.  To earn the K-12 endorsement, teachers need to add the reading course that would extend their certification to include the other level.
4. One of the following courses (3 credits):
FLT 807 Foreign Language Teaching Methods 3
LLT 807 Language Teaching Methods 3
5. One of the following courses (3 credits):
FLT 808 Assessment for Foreign Language Teaching 3
LLT 808 Assessment for Language Teaching and Research 3
6. One of the following courses (3 credits):
FLT 860 Foreign Language Acquisition 3
LLT 860 Second Language Acquisition 3

 

Graduate Specialization in Language and Literacy Education

The Graduate Specialization in Language and Literacy Education, which is administered by the Department of Teacher Education, is designed for students who aspire to be scholars, curriculum developers, and policy leaders in literacy at school, district, state, national, and international levels. The specialization focuses on literacy theory, research, and education. It is for students who wish to address issues of language and literacy development, literacy use, literacy instruction, literacy contexts of social, cultural, and linguistic differences, and the possibilities of transforming how people read and take action in their worlds.

The graduate specialization is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Educational Psychology and Educational Technology and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Curriculum, Instruction and Teacher Education and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Special Education. Students must meet the requirements of the specialization specified below, in addition to the requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Educational Psychology and Educational Technology or the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Curriculum, Instruction and Teacher Education or the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Special Education.With the approval of the department and college that administers the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the specialization may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the doctoral degree.

For further information visit the Language and Literacy Web site at: http://education.msu.edu/academics/graduate-specializations-certificates/.


Requirements for the Graduate Specialization in Language and Literacy Education 

1. All of the following courses (9 credits):
CEP 930 Educational Inquiry 3
TE 946 Current Perspectives in Literacy Research and Instruction 3
TE 931 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Educational Research 3
2. One advanced inquiry/research course related to the student’s field of interest. 3
3. Four of the following courses (12 credits):
CEP 912 Reading Comprehension: Research and Theory 3
CEP 915 Literacy in Sociocultural Context 3
CEP 941 Academic Issues in Special Education for At-Risk Students 3
CEP 980 Writing, Research and Theory 3
CEP 981 Research on Literacy and Technology 3
TE 904 ELL/ESL Research and Practice: K-12 3
TE 944 Seminar in English Education 3
TE 945 Current Issues in Children’s and Adolescent Literature 3
TE 958 History of Literacy Research and Instruction 3
TE 959 Acquisition and Development of Language and Literacy 3
TE 991B Special Topics in Language and Literacy Education 3
TE 994 Laboratory and Field Experience in Curriculum, 3
Instruction and Teacher Education
4. One of the following research practicums (1 to 3 credits):
CEP 995 Practicum in Research Design and Data Analysis 1 to 3
TE 995 Research Practicum in Curriculum, Instruction and
Teacher Education 1 to 3
The practicum should be focused on a problem in language and literacy education.


Graduate Specialization in Literacy and Language Instruction

The Graduate Specialization in Literacy and Language Instruction, which is administered by the Department of Teacher Education in the College of Education, is designed for students who aspire to develop strong expertise in literacy and language instruction. The specialization is available only online. 

 

The specialization is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in master’s degree programs at Michigan State University. With the approval of the department and college that administers the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the specialization may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the master’s degree.

 

Requirements for the Graduate Specialization in Literacy and Language Instruction

 

Students must complete the following (21 credits):

 

               
1. All of the following courses (18 credits):  
  TE 807 Professional Development and Inquiry 3
  TE 845 Language Diversity and Literacy Instruction and Assessment 3
  TE 848 Writing Assessment and Instruction 3
  TE 849 Methods and Materials for Teaching Children’s and Adolescent Literature 3
  TE 853 Assessing and Responding to Literacy Learning Difficulties I 3
  TE 873 Literacy Leadership 3
2. One of the following courses (3 credits):  
  TE 842 Elementary Reading Assessment and Instruction 3
  TE 843 Secondary Reading Assessment and Instruction 3