Academic Programs Catalog

College of Communication Arts and Sciences

Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders

Dimitar Deliyski, Chairperson

Undergraduate Program

The Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders (CSD) brings together a faculty of some of the world's leading experts who work in state-of-the-art laboratories to "advance knowledge and transform lives" of people with communication disorders. The department offers a nationally accredited master's and doctoral program that prepares students for exciting careers in research, teaching, administration or in the clinic. A Minor in Communicative Sciences and Disorders, with several online offerings, is available for undergraduates preparing for graduate studies.

Minor in Communicative Sciences and Disorders

The Minor in Communicative Sciences and Disorders assists students in acquiring understanding of both normal and disordered aspects of speech, language, and hearing; and knowledge and skills regarding the diagnosis and treatment of communication disorders. Speech, language, and hearing disorders can occur at any time over the lifespan and are among the most common challenges faced by the elderly. Completion of the minor provides preparation required for admission to graduate study in communication disorders.

The minor is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs at Michigan State University.  With the approval of the department and college that administers the student’s degree program, the courses that are used to satisfy the minor may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

Students who plan to complete the requirements for the minor should consult an undergraduate advisor in the department.

Requirements for the Minor in Communicative Sciences and Disorders

Students must complete 21 credits from the following:

                   
CSD 213 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms 3
CSD 303 Fundamentals of Hearing       3
CSD 313 Speech Science         3
CSD 333 Oral Language Development       3
CSD 364 Speech and Language Disorders and their Evaluation 3
CSD 444 Audiologic Assessment and Intervention/Rehabilitation 3
CSD 463 Intervention/Rehabilitation Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology 3


Graduate Study

The Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders offers two graduate degrees, the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and the Master of Arts (M.A.) in Communicative Sciences and Disorders.

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is the terminal degree in the broad areas of speech-language pathology and speech and hearing sciences. This degree program emphasizes research to advance our knowledge about speech, language and hearing processes, its assessment and rehabilitation. The program is tailored to match each individual student’s interests and typically requires students to complete advanced course work on several different content areas along with conducting multiple research projects that culminate in a doctoral dissertation. Students are mentored directly by our faculty and are supported through multiple research laboratories and other resources. In order to develop their academic and research skills, students in this program also work collaboratively with experts in other disciplines such as neurology, radiology, cognitive sciences, communication, media and information studies, engineering, education, linguistics or psychology. Students completing the Ph.D. degree generally seek employment as researchers, teachers or in senior administrative or clinical roles in academia, industry, government or non-profit organizations.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) is the entry-level degree for professional practice as a Speech-Language Pathologist in the United States. This program is accredited by the Council of Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA). This program consists of academic course work focused on clinical assessment and rehabilitation of patients with speech and language disorders, including those related to articulation and phonology, speech and language development, disorders of fluency and voice, speech and language disorders related to a variety of neurological conditions, dysphagia or swallowing disorders, cognitive deficits, etc. Academic course work is structured to emphasize critical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork and leadership. Classroom training is further supplemented through supervised clinical training in a wide range of patient care facilities including educational (schools), acute care (e.g. hospitals) and long-term care facilities (e.g. nursing homes). Students are expected to accrue a minimum of 400 hours of clinical training before completing this program. Students completing the M.A. degree typically seek employment as a speech-language pathologist.

Students who are enrolled in master’s or doctoral degree programs in the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders may elect an Interdepartmental Specialization in Cognitive Science.  For additional information, refer to the statement on Interdepartmental Graduate Specializations in Cognitive Science in the College of Social Science section of this catalog.  For additional information, contact the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders.

Students who are enrolled in master’s or doctoral degree programs in the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders may elect a Specialization in Infancy and Early Childhood.  For additional information, refer to the statement on Interdepartmental Graduate Specializations in Infancy and Early Childhood in the College of Social Science section of this catalog.  For additional information, contact the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders.


Communicative Sciences and Disorders - Master of Arts

The master’s degree program in speech-language pathology provides academic and practicum experiences for students preparing for professional careers as speech-language pathologists in settings such as schools, clinics, hospitals, and rehabilitation programs. The master’s degree program also provides the basis for further study for students who wish to pursue more advanced degrees.  The master’s degree program in speech-language pathology has been accredited by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.  The master’s degree program is available under either Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (without thesis).

Numerous clinical off-campus facilities provide opportunities for students to gain extensive and varied practicum experiences in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Communication Arts and Sciences, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

Admission to regular status in the Master of Arts program is contingent upon a bachelor's degree from an approved college or university, an academic grade–point average of 3.0 or better in the last two years of undergraduate study, and approval by the department. Three letters of reference (submitted on forms supplied by the department) attesting to the student's potential for graduate study are required. As part of the admission process, students must also submit a statement of purpose clearly specifying why they wish to earn a master's degree.

Students who hold undergraduate degrees in fields other than communicative sciences and disorders may be accepted in the program and may be required to complete course work in communicative sciences and disorders or other areas to meet American Speech-Language Hearing Association  standards required for certification. This may require an additional one or two semesters of course work.

The deadline for the receipt of all application material is January 15th. Students are admitted only in fall semester.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree in Communicative Sciences and Disorders

At least 51 credits are required for the master's degree in Communicative Sciences and Disorders under either Plan A or Plan B.

                     
Speech-Language Pathology (51 credits)  
Requirements for both Plan A and Plan B (45 credits):  
1. All of the following courses (45 credits):  
  CSD 803 Research Methods in Communicative Sciences and Disorders 3
  CSD 813 Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Speech, Language, and Hearing 3
  CSD 815 Acquired Language Disorders 3
  CSD 820 Language Assessment and Intervention: Early Stages 3
  CSD 821 Language Assessment and Intervention: Later Stages 3
  CSD 830 Fluency Disorders 3
  CSD 840 Voice Disorders 3
  CSD 855 Assessment and Treatment of Dysphagia 3
  CSD 860 Articulation and Phonological Disorders 3
  CSD 865 Motor Speech Disorders 3
  CSD 880 Clinical Proseminar in Communicative Sciences and Disorders 3
  CSD 883 Clinical Practicum in Speech—Language Pathology 12
2. In exceptional circumstances, with the approval of the department chairperson, a program of study may be designed with reduced emphasis on clinical education and increased emphasis on other academic areas, which would be reflected in the content of the master's degree final examination or thesis requirements.  
Additional Requirements for Plan A (6 credits):  
1. The following course:  
  CSD 899 Master's Thesis Research       6
2. Successful completion of an oral thesis defense.  
     
Additional Requirements for Plan B (6 credits):  
1. Six additional credits in courses approved by the student's academic advisor.  
2. Successful completion of a departmental final examination.  



Communicative Sciences and Disorders - Doctor of Philosophy

The Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders offers doctoral programs directed toward advanced study of human communication sciences and disorders.  Doctoral programs of study are designed to meet the individual needs of students preparing for research, teaching, clinical, and administrative careers.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Communication Arts and Sciences, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

Admission to the doctoral program in communicative sciences and disorders requires a minimum of a master's degree or the equivalent that focused on human communication sciences and disorders; evidence of high academic achievement; a minimum of three letters of recommendation (submitted on forms supplied by the department) attesting to the student's academic abilities and achievements, and to the student's potential for doctoral–level academic and research success; and approval of the department.  Students must also submit a statement of purpose clearly specifying why they wish to pursue a doctoral degree. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Communicative Sciences and Disorders

Students must meet the requirements specified below:

  1. Complete core courses covering the areas of speech and hearing sciences, and related instrumentation; neuroanatomy and physiology; and psycholinguistics.
  2. Complete courses and experiences addressing the following areas of research:
    a.    Statistical analysis of data.
    b.    Research design and methodology.
    c.    Research practicum.
  3. Complete an approved major area of study of human communication sciences and disorders that includes courses and experiences which are thematically related.
  4. Complete an approved minor or cognate area of study outside the department which is thematically related to and aligned with human communication sciences and disorders.
  5. Pass a written and oral comprehensive examination addressing the preceding requirements.
  6. Successful completion and oral defense of a dissertation based upon original research that represents a contribution to the scientific knowledge base of human communication sciences and disorders.