Academic Programs Catalog

College of Natural Science

Graduate Study


Cell and Molecular Biology - Master of Science

This program provides theoretical and practical training in cell and molecular biology to prepare students for a variety of professional positions in academia, industry or government.

Admission

Most students enter the Master of Science degree program in cell and molecular biology with the goal of eventually obtaining a Ph.D. degree. However, students with limited research experience or specific deficiencies in their undergraduate training may be admitted to this program to obtain additional experience.  Applicants will be considered by the Cell and Molecular Biology admissions committee, and in general the criteria for admission are similar to those of the Ph.D. program (an undergraduate major in biological science, acceptable GPA and GRE scores, and letters of recommendation).

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and the College of Natural Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Cell and Molecular Biology

Students in the M.S. program in Cell and Molecular Biology must complete a total of 30 credits for the degree under either Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (without thesis). These credits must include core courses in molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics. Detailed course and other requirements are specified in the cell and molecular biology graduate manual.

For a Plan A master’s degree, students must complete a minimum of 4 and a maximum of 10 credits of Cell and Molecular Biology 899, Master’s Research. They must also prepare a written thesis, complete a final research seminar, and pass an oral examination.

For a Plan B master’s degree, student may complete a maximum of 8 credits of Cell and Molecular Biology 890, Independent Study. They must also complete a final report and pass an oral examination.



Cell and Molecular Biology - Doctor of Philosophy

The interdepartmental Doctor of Philosophy degree program with a major in cell and molecular biology is administered by the College of Natural Science.  Students may elect to complete the requirements for a second major, in addition to the requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in cell and molecular biology.

The educational objectives of the program are to provide doctoral  students with fundamental knowledge and research skills so that they may become independent and self–educating scholars. 

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Natural Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy degree program with a major in cell and molecular biology, an applicant must have taken the Graduate Record Examination General Test.

To be admitted to the doctoral program in cell and molecular biology, it is recommended that an applicant have:

  1. Completed a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree with a minimum grade–point average of 3.00.
  2. A broad background in biology, including courses in biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, and molecular biology.
  3. Completed at least one year of study in each of the following fields:  physics, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and mathematics through integral calculus.
  4. A grade of 3.0 or above in each science and mathematics course completed.
  5. Acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination General Test.

Applicants with deficiencies in academic preparation may be admitted provisionally, in which case they will be required to complete collateral courses.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Cell and Molecular Biology

The student must:

               
1. Complete all of the following courses (15 credits):  
  BMB 801 Molecular Biology and Protein Structure 4
  BMB 825 Cell Structure and Function 3
  CMB 800 Cell and Molecular Biology Seminar 3
  CMB 892 Research Forum 4
  One graduate course in scientific ethics 1
2. Complete one of the following courses (3 credits):  
  MMG 833 Microbial Genetics 3
  MMG 835 Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics 3
3. Complete a minimum of two additional graduate courses of at least 3 credits each that are related to the student's research.  
4. Complete a 10–week research rotation in the laboratory of each of three different members of the cell and molecular biology faculty during the first year of enrollment in the program.  
5. Pass the preliminary examination given at the end of the second year of graduate study.  
6. Successfully complete a minimum of two semesters as a teaching assistant in a department represented on the cell and molecular biology faculty.  The student's teaching assignment must be approved by the director of the doctoral program in cell and molecular biology.  

For additional information, contact the director of the doctoral program in cell and molecular biology, 153 Giltner Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.



BioMolecular Science Gateway - First Year

Students are encouraged to apply for admission to the Ph.D. program through the BioMolecular Science Gateway – First Year, where students choose a doctoral major from any of six Ph.D. programs: biochemistry and molecular biology, cell and molecular biology, genetics, microbiology and molecular genetics, pharmacology and toxicology, or physiology. For additional information refer to the College of Natural Science section of this catalog.


Cell and Molecular Biology - Environmental Toxicology - Doctor of Philosophy

For information about the Doctor of Philosophy degree program in cell and molecular biology—environmental toxicology, refer to the statement on Doctoral Program in Environmental and Integrative Toxicological Sciences in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.

 


Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior - Dual Major

The interdepartmental dual major in ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior is administered by the College of Natural Science.  The dual major is  available only to those students who plan to complete a Ph.D. degree program that involves ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior and who have a graduate major at Michigan State University.  The student does not have the option of completing a dual major in ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior alone.

The educational objectives of the interdepartmental program are to:

  1. provide an opportunity for doctoral students to obtain a comprehensive and contemporary academic experience in the field of ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior.
  2. stimulate doctoral students with an interest in ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior to become sensitive to their professional obligations and responsibilities.
  3. develop an intellectual environment which will foster the growth of research and teaching in the area of ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior.

Students who are enrolled in the dual major in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior may elect an Interdepartmental Specialization in Cognitive Science. For additional information, refer to the statement on Interdepartmental Graduate Specializations in Cognitive Science in the College of Social Science section of this catalog. For additional information, contact the College of Natural Science.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the University and of the College of Natural Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

In order to enroll in the dual major in ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior a student must also have been admitted to a major at Michigan State University. A minimum undergraduate grade-point average of 3.0 and undergraduate mathematics through calculus are required for admission to the dual major.

The Graduate Admissions Committee, composed of members of the ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior faculty reviews applications for admission and recommends acceptance of applicants for admission.  In special cases an applicant who has deficiencies in background courses may be admitted to the dual major on a provisional basis.

Guidance Committee

During the first year of enrollment in the dual major, the student and a member of the ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior faculty who will serve as the student’s major professor will constitute a  guidance committee that will assist in planning the student’s program of study.  At least two members of the ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior faculty shall be members of the committee.  The student’s program of study will involve ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior and a major in the student's department.  The program shall be planned in accordance with the statement on Dual Major Doctoral Degrees in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.

Students in the dual major in ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior are expected to attend weekly seminars and to participate in the graduate student-organized research colloquium.

Requirements for the Dual Major in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior

  1. One 3-credit course in ecology at the 800-900 level from a list of approved courses available from the office of the ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior program.
  2. One 3-credit course in evolution at the 800-900 level from a list of approved courses available from the office of the ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior program.
  3. One 3-credit course in quantitative methods at the 800-900 level from a list of approved courses available from the office of the ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior program.
  4. Twenty-four credits in Doctoral Dissertation Research (course number 999) from the student's departmental major.
  5. Pass a comprehensive examination that will be defined by the requirements of the student's major department and that will include a written examination in which the student demonstrates a knowledge of ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior as determined by the guidance committee.
  6. Submit a dissertation that, in the judgment of the student’s guidance committee, represents the integration of ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior and the student’s departmental major.

Genetics - Master of Science

The primary purpose of the Master of Science in Genetics is to train students for a variety of careers in areas of genetics and genomics. The program also seeks to provide graduate students who are seeking the Ph.D. degree, state-of-the-art knowledge and skills to prepare them for careers in research and teaching.

Admission

Applicants will be considered for admission by the Genetics Admissions Committee. The criteria for admission include an undergraduate major in the biological sciences, acceptable grade-point average and GRE scores, a statement of objectives and three letters of recommendation. The Genetics Admissions Committee will also consider requests for students to transfer from the Doctor of Philosophy in Genetics to this program.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and the College of Natural Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Genetics

All students in the Master of Science in Genetics must earn at least 30 credits, of which a minimum of 20 credits must consist of course work and must include the core courses specified for the Ph.D. program. Detailed course work and other requirements are specified in the Student Handbook of the Genetics Program. For a Plan A (with thesis) degree, students must complete 4 to 10 credits of Genetics 899, Master’s Thesis Research, submit a written thesis, present a final research seminar and pass a final oral examination. For a Plan B (without thesis) degree, students must have earned at least 26 credits through course work, may receive a maximum of 4 credits for work completed in Genetics 899, Master’s Thesis Research, submit a final report and pass an oral examination.

 


Genetics - Doctor of Philosophy

The interdepartmental Doctor of Philosophy degree program with a major in genetics is administered by the College of Natural Science. The objectives of the program are (1) to prepare the student for independent research and teaching, (2) to help the student to understand the nature and significance of genetics as a whole and to gain strength in related sciences, such as molecular biology and biochemistry, and (3) to enable the student to keep in the forefront of this continuously changing field.

Students may specialize in one area of genetics, but are required to familiarize themselves with all major areas of the discipline. Students may elect to complete the requirements for a second major, such as biochemistry, in addition to the requirements for the doctoral degree in genetics.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Natural Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

For regular admission a student must have a bachelor's degree with a grade–point average of 3.30, appropriate background in the biological and physical sciences, and approval of the Genetics Program Admissions Committee. In special cases an applicant who fails to meet the grade–point average requirement, or who has deficiencies in background courses, i.e., organic chemistry, physics, calculus, or biology, may be admitted on a provisional basis. Applicants admitted on a provisional basis must remove these deficiencies within one year of admission to the genetics program.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Genetics

The program of study is planned by the student in consultation with the major professor and a guidance committee. Specific courses in genetics, as well as courses in other areas considered relevant to the student's interests and chosen research area, are included in the program. Students in the program will write and defend a research dissertation which shows original treatment of an important research problem. A detailed description of the genetics program and of the research interests of the genetics faculty may be obtained by writing the Director of the Genetics Program, Michigan State University, Plant Biology Laboratories, 612 Wilson Road, Room S–352, East Lansing, MI 48824.

 


BioMolecular Science Gateway - First Year

Students are encouraged to apply for admission to the Ph.D. program through the BioMolecular Science Gateway – First Year, where students choose a doctoral major from any of six Ph.D. programs: biochemistry and molecular biology, cell and molecular biology, genetics, microbiology and molecular genetics, pharmacology and toxicology, or physiology. For additional information refer to the College of Natural Science section of this catalog.


Genetics - Environmental Toxicology - Doctor of Philosophy

For information about the Doctor of Philosophy degree program in genetics—environmental toxicology, refer to the statement on Doctoral Program in Environmental and Integrative Toxicological Sciences in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.

 


Medical Neuroscience - Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Medical Neuroscience is aimed at students who are currently working in the pharmaceutical or medical device industries and students interested in applying to graduate or professional school. It provides post-baccalaureate credentials and career development for students seeking to improve their academic profile or employment qualifications meeting the needs of both working professionals and full-time students. The certificate is available online only.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Graduate Certificate in Medical Neuroscience, students must:

  1. have a bachelor’s degree in a biological science background.
  2. have a minimum cumulative undergraduate grade-point average of 2.5.
  3. write a reflective essay describing how the certificate will enhance their professional and personal development.
Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Medical Neuroscience

Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses:
1. Both of the following courses (6 credits):
NEU 841 Medical Neuroscience 3
NEU 846 Neurobiology of Nervous System Disorders 3
2. At least 6 credits from the following courses:
NEU 842 Neuroethics 2
NEU 843 Methods for Assessing the Nervous System 2
NEU 844 The Science and Ethics of Brain Interventions 2
NEU 847 Development of the Nervous System 3
PHM 431 Pharmacology of Drug Addiction 3

 

Molecular Plant Sciences - Dual Major

The interdepartmental dual major in molecular plant sciences is administered by the College of Natural Science.  The dual major is available only to those students who plan to complete a Ph.D. degree program that involves plant molecular biology and who have a graduate major at Michigan State University.  The student does not have the option of completing a dual major in plant molecular biology alone.

The educational objectives of the interdepartmental program are to prepare students to:

  1. function as independent scientists able to develop new knowledge and understanding about the molecular processes driving plant energy status, metabolism, growth, development, gene regulation, evolution, plant stress tolerance, and environmental interactions;
  2. devise and test informative hypotheses and apply key molecular and omics approaches to problems in these areas, and;
  3. engage in planning, performing, and management of independent and collaborative research and teaching.
In addition to meeting the requirements of the University and of the College of Natural Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

In order to enroll in the dual major in plant molecular biology a student must also have been admitted to a major at Michigan State University. A minimum undergraduate grade-point average of 3.0 and a sufficient background in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and/or computer science is required for admission to the dual major. In special cases, an applicant who has deficiencies in background courses may be admitted to the dual major on a provisional basis.

The Molecular Plant Sciences Graduate Admissions Committee composed of members of the molecular plant sciences faculty and the primary department/program admissions committee reviews applications for admission and recommends acceptance of applicants for admission. The application process is composed of two parts: a standard MSU application to the primary department/program of the student’s choice and a one-page description of the student’s interest in the molecular plant sciences program. Applicants suitable will be forwarded to the Plant Science Recruitment director for onsite interviews. Offer letters will be co-signed by the molecular plant sciences program and the student’s primary department.

Guidance Committee

During the first year of enrollment in the dual major, the student and a member of the molecular plant sciences faculty who will serve as the student’s major professor will constitute a guidance committee that will assist in planning the student’s program of study.  At least two members of the molecular plant sciences faculty shall be members of the committee along with two faculty members from the student’s primary department.  The student’s program of study will involve molecular plant sciences and a major in the student's department.  The program shall be planned in accordance with the statement on Dual Major Doctoral Degrees in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.

Students in the dual major in molecular plant sciences are expected to do research rotations in three laboratories, attend seminars and engage in other programmatic activities.

Requirements for the Dual Major in Molecular Plant Sciences
  1. The course requirements will be specified in a graduate handbook in consultation with the student’s major professor and guidance committee.
  2. Three graduate seminar courses in subjects relevant to molecular plant sciences.
  3. Twenty-four credits in Doctoral Dissertation Research (course number 999) from the student's departmental major.
  4. Pass a comprehensive examination that will be defined by the requirements of the student's major department and that will include a written examination in which the student demonstrates a knowledge of molecular plant sciences as determined by the guidance committee.
  5. Submit and defend a dissertation that, in the judgment of the student’s guidance committee, shows original treatment of an important scientific question.


 

Neuroscience and the Law - Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Neuroscience and the Law is designed to provide individuals working in law or social sciences fields with the scientific knowledge necessary to effectively, accurately, and ethically use neuroscientific evidence in a professional setting. The certificate will meet the needs of both working professionals and full-time students.  The certificate is available online only.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Graduate Certificate in Neuroscience and the Law, students must:

  1. have a bachelor’s degree.
  2. have a minimum cumulative undergraduate grade-point average of 2.25.
  3. write a reflective essay describing how the certificate will enhance their professional and personal development.
Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Neuroscience and the Law

Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses:
1. Both of the following courses (5 credits):
NEU 840 Social, Cognitive, and Affective Neuroscience 3
NEU 892 Special Topics in Neuroscience and the Law 2
2. The following course (2 credits):
NEU 848 Foundations of Law and Legal Research 2
Students who have completed at least one year of law school are not required to complete this requirement for the certificate.
3. At least 5 to 7 credits from the following courses:
NEU 842 Neuroethics 3
NEU 843 Methods for Assessing the Nervous System 2
NEU 844 The Science and Ethics of Brain Interventions 2
NEU 845 Neuroscience of Drug Use and Human Disorders 3



 

Neuroscience - Master of Science

Several colleges and departments within Michigan State University cooperate in offering the interdepartmental Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree program with a major in neuroscience, which is administered by the College of Natural Science.  Students may elect to complete the requirements for a second major, in addition to the requirements for the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree in neuroscience.

Students who are enrolled in the master’s or doctoral degree program with a major in Neuroscience may also elect an Interdepartmental Specialization in Cognitive Science. For additional information, refer to the statement on Interdepartmental Graduate Specializations in Cognitive Science in the College of Social Science section of this catalog. For additional information, contact the College of Natural Science.

The major objective of the M.S. program is to provide sufficient theoretical and practical training in neuroscience to allow students to obtain professional level positions in academic, industrial, or governmental institutions.

Admission

Admission to graduate study in neuroscience is primarily to the doctoral program. Students are generally accepted for graduate study in neuroscience only if judged by a program committee to be qualified to complete the doctoral degree. However, under certain circumstances, the program may consider applications for admission to the Master of Science in Neuroscience from students who wish to earn a master’s degree in preparation for the doctoral degree. For consultation, contact the program director.

To be considered for admission to the Master of Science degree in Neuroscience an applicant should:

  1. have taken a broad spectrum of basic science courses.
  2. have a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in science and mathematics courses.

To be eligible for regular admission to the Master of Science degree in Neuroscience, an applicant must:

  1. have completed an undergraduate degree in a biological or physical science or a related discipline.
  2. have earned an overall grade-point average of 3.0.
  3. have the results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test forwarded to the College of Natural Science.

Laboratory research experience is recommended, but not required. Applicants with deficiencies in academic preparation may be admitted provisionally, with the requirement that they complete collateral science courses during the first year of study; these collateral courses will not count toward the degree.

Admission decisions are made by the Neuroscience Program Graduate Affairs Committee.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and the College of Natural Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Neuroscience

The program is available under either Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (without thesis). A total of 30 credits is required for the degree under either Plan A or Plan B. The student’s program of study must be approved by the student’s guidance committee. The student must meet the requirements specified below:

               
Requirements for Plan A and Plan B  
1. Complete all of the following courses (17 credits):  
  NEU 804 Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology 3
  NEU 806 Advanced Neuroscience Techniques Laboratory 3
  NEU 839 Systems Neuroscience 4
  PHM 827 Physiology and Pharmacology of Excitable Cells 4
  PSY 811 Advanced Behavioral Neuroscience 3
2. Complete one of the following courses (3 credits):  
  PHM 830 Experimental Design and Data Analysis 3
  PSY 815 Quantitative Research Design and Analysis in Psychology 3
3. Complete a minimum of 6 credits in Neuroscience 800 or 899. Plan A students must complete 4 credits of Neuroscience 899.  
4. Complete an additional 4 credits of elective courses related to the student’s research and approved by the student’s guidance committee. These credits may be earned in Neuroscience 800 or 899 if the student chooses.  
5. Complete a one semester laboratory rotation with each of two neuroscience faculty in the first year of study. Students will select the two laboratories in which they will rotate at the beginning of fall Semester based on discussions and mutual agreement with neuroscience faculty members.  

Additional Requirements for Plan A

Successful completion and defense of a thesis based on original research on an important problem in neuroscience in a seminar-based public forum.

Additional Requirements for Plan B

Successful completion and presentation of a research-based paper.



Neuroscience - Doctor of Philosophy

The program provides an opportunity for doctoral students to acquire both a broad and in-depth knowledge of the function of the nervous system.  The program is designed to:

  1. Make it possible for a doctoral student to obtain a comprehensive and contemporary academic experience in the field of neuroscience.
  2. Prepare students for their future professional obligations and responsibilities as scholars.
  3. Develop an intellectual environment that will foster the growth of research and teaching in the area of neuroscience.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the College of Natural Science, students must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

To be considered for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy degree program with a major in neuroscience, an applicant should have:

  1. Completed a broad spectrum of basic science courses.
  2. A grade-point average of at least 3.0 in science and mathematics courses.
  3. Experience in laboratory research.

To be eligible for regular admission to the Doctor of Philosophy degree program with a major in neuroscience, an applicant must have:

  1. Completed an undergraduate degree in a biological, psychological, or physical science or in a related discipline.
  2. An overall grade-point average of at least 3.0.
  3. Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination General Test as judged by the faculty.

Admission decisions are made by the Neuroscience Program Admissions Committee. Applicants with deficiencies in academic preparation may be admitted provisionally, with the requirement that they complete collateral science courses during the first year of study; these collateral courses will not count toward the degree.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Neuroscience

The student must:

               
1. Complete all of the following courses:  
  NEU 800 Neuroscience Research Forum 4
  NEU 804 Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology 3
  NEU 806 Advanced Neuroscience Techniques Laboratory 3
  NEU 839 Systems Neuroscience 4
  NEU 890 Independent Study in Neuroscience 4
  NEU 999 Doctoral Dissertation Research 24
  PHM 827 Advanced Neurobiology 4
  PSY 811 Advanced Behavioral Neuroscience 3
2. Complete one of the following courses (3 credits):  
  PHM 830 Experimental Design and Data Analysis 3
  PSY  815 Quantitative Research Design and Analysis in Psychology 3
3. Complete in the first year of enrollment in the program a one-semester laboratory rotation (NEU 890) with each of two members of the faculty.  Each rotation is established by mutual agreement of the faculty member and the student.  
4. Pass the written comprehensive examination given at the end of the second year of enrollment in the program.  
5. Complete and orally defend a dissertation research proposal.  
6. Complete and defend a dissertation based on original research on an important problem in neuroscience.  
7. All students must complete Responsible Conduct of Research Training.  

The colleges and departments that are listed below cooperate in offering the interdepartmental Doctor of Philosophy degree program with a major in neuroscience:

Colleges
    Human Medicine
    Osteopathic Medicine
    Social Science
    Veterinary Medicine
Departments
    Anatomy (Division of)
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation
    Pharmacology and Toxicology
    Physiology
    Psychology
    Zoology

A detailed description of the Doctor of Philosophy degree program with a major in neuroscience and of the research interests of participating faculty may be obtained upon request from the Neuroscience Program Administrative Office, Giltner Hall, 293 Farm Lane, Room 108, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1317, or by visiting the Web site at  http://www.neuroscience.msu.edu.

 


Neuroscience - Environmental Toxicology - Doctor of Philosophy

For information about the Doctor of Philosophy degree program in neuroscience—environmental toxicology, refer to the statement on Doctoral Program in Environmental and Integrative Toxicological Sciences in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.


Quantitative Biology - Dual Major

The interdepartmental dual major in quantitative biology is administered by the College of Natural Science. The dual major is available only to those students who plan to complete a Ph.D. degree program that involves a research project and course work in quantitative biology and a major in one of the following departments that are affiliated with the interdepartmental program: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Chemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Epidemiology, Genetics, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Physics and Astronomy, Physiology, Plant Biology, Statistics and Probability, and Zoology. The student does not have the option of completing a major in quantitative biology alone.

The educational objectives of the interdepartmental program are to:

  1. provide an opportunity for doctoral students to obtain an interdisciplinary and contemporary academic experience in the field of quantitative biology.
  2. stimulate doctoral students with an interest in biological sciences to develop skills in chemical/physical or mathematical/computational approaches while encouraging doctoral students in the chemical, physical, mathematical, and computational sciences to apply their skills to solve biological problems.
  3. develop an intellectual environment that will foster the growth of research and teaching in the area of quantitative biology.

In addition to meeting the requirements of the university and of the department and college in which the student is enrolled, the student must meet the requirements specified below.

Admission

In order to enroll in the dual major in quantitative biology a student must also have been admitted to a major in one of the affiliated departments. A minimum undergraduate grade-point average of 3.0 and undergraduate mathematics through calculus are required for admission to the dual major. Students may apply  to the quantitative biology program at any time prior to their preliminary exam.

Admission to the quantitative biology dual major is by approval of the quantitative biology recruiting committee and the graduate program director. In special cases, an applicant who has deficiencies in background courses may be admitted to the dual major on a provisional basis.

Guidance Committee

The student must select two mentors, typically one from a biological discipline and one from a chemical, physical, mathematical, computational, or engineering discipline. Both of these mentors will serve on the guidance committee.  At least two members of the student’s guidance committee must be members of the quantitative biology faculty. At least one member of the committee must be from a department or disciplinary program other than the one that administers the student’s disciplinary major. The student’s program of study will be planned in accordance with the statement on Dual Major Doctoral Degrees in the Graduate Education section of this catalog.

Requirements for the Dual Major in Quantitative Biology

               
 1.

At least two courses totaling a combined minimum of 5 credits that provide graduate training in biology to students in chemical/physical or mathematical/computational disciplines or that provide graduate training in chemical, physical, mathematical, or computational methods to those in the biological disciplines. The courses should be complementary to the student’s research, relevant to the goals of the quantitative biology program, and must be approved by the program director. Approved concentration areas include:  molecular biophysics, systems biology, ecological and evolutionary modeling, or genomics, bioinformatics, and computational biology.

 
2. Twenty-four credits in Doctoral Dissertation Research (course number 999) from one of the departments referenced above.  
3. Pass a comprehensive examination that will be defined by the requirements of the participating primary department and that will demonstrate appropriate knowledge of quantitative biology as determined by the guidance committee.  
4. Submit a dissertation that, in the judgment of the student’s guidance committee, represents the area of quantitative biology.  
5. Regularly attend and participate in quantitative biology sponsored seminars.